Franklin D. Roosevelt Delivers D-Day Prayer

Franklin D. Roosevelt Delivers D-Day Prayer


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In a national radio broadcast on June 6, 1944, as 160,000 Allied troops land in Normandy in an attempt to liberate France, President Franklin D. Roosevelt asks America to join him in a prayer.


Prayer on D-Day

My fellow Americans: Last night, when I spoke with you about the fall of Rome, I knew at that moment that troops of the United States and our allies were crossing the Channel in another and greater operation. It has come to pass with success thus far.
And so, in this poignant hour, I ask you to join with me in prayer:

Almighty God: Our sons, pride of our Nation, this day have set upon a mighty endeavor, a struggle to preserve our Republic, our religion, and our civilization, and to set free a suffering humanity.

Lead them straight and true give strength to their arms, stoutness to their hearts, steadfastness in their faith.

They will need Thy blessings. Their road will be long and hard. For the enemy is strong. He may hurl back our forces. Success may not come with rushing speed, but we shall return again and again and we know that by Thy grace, and by the righteousness of our cause, our sons will triumph.

They will be sore tried, by night and by day, without rest-until the victory is won. The darkness will be rent by noise and flame. Men’s souls will be shaken with the violences of war.

For these men are lately drawn from the ways of peace. They fight not for the lust of conquest. They fight to end conquest. They fight to liberate. They fight to let justice arise, and tolerance and good will among all Thy people. They yearn but for the end of battle, for their return to the haven of home.

Some will never return. Embrace these, Father, and receive them, Thy heroic servants, into Thy kingdom.

And for us at home – fathers, mothers, children, wives, sisters, and brothers of brave men overseas – whose thoughts and prayers are ever with them – help us, Almighty God, to rededicate ourselves in renewed faith in Thee in this hour of great sacrifice.

Many people have urged that I call the Nation into a single day of special prayer. But because the road is long and the desire is great, I ask that our people devote themselves in a continuance of prayer. As we rise to each new day, and again when each day is spent, let words of prayer be on our lips, invoking Thy help to our efforts.

Give us strength, too – strength in our daily tasks, to redouble the contributions we make in the physical and the material support of our armed forces.

And let our hearts be stout, to wait out the long travail, to bear sorrows that may come, to impart our courage unto our sons wheresoever they may be.

And, O Lord, give us Faith. Give us Faith in Thee Faith in our sons Faith in each other Faith in our united crusade. Let not the keenness of our spirit ever be dulled. Let not the impacts of temporary events, of temporal matters of but fleeting moment let not these deter us in our unconquerable purpose.

With Thy blessing, we shall prevail over the unholy forces of our enemy. Help us to conquer the apostles of greed and racial arrogancies. Lead us to the saving of our country, and with our sister Nations into a world unity that will spell a sure peace a peace invulnerable to the schemings of unworthy men. And a peace that will let all of men live in freedom, reaping the just rewards of their honest toil.


President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s D-Day Prayer – June 6, 1944

On this the 75th Anniversary of the D-Day Invasion, the Great Crusade to liberate Europe from the yoke of Nazi oppression, let us pause and reflect on this prayer offered at the outset of that invasion by the late President Franklin Roosevelt…

My fellow Americans: Last night, when I spoke with you about the fall of Rome, I knew at that moment that troops of the United States and our allies were crossing the Channel in another and greater operation. It has come to pass with success thus far.

And so, in this poignant hour, I ask you to join with me in prayer:

Almighty God: Our sons, pride of our Nation, this day have set upon a mighty endeavor, a struggle to preserve our Republic, our religion, and our civilization, and to set free a suffering humanity.

Lead them straight and true give strength to their arms, stoutness to their hearts, steadfastness in their faith.

They will need Thy blessings. Their road will be long and hard. For the enemy is strong. He may hurl back our forces. Success may not come with rushing speed, but we shall return again and again and we know that by Thy grace, and by the righteousness of our cause, our sons will triumph.

They will be sore tried, by night and by day, without rest-until the victory is won. The darkness will be rent by noise and flame. Men’s souls will be shaken with the violences of war.

For these men are lately drawn from the ways of peace. They fight not for the lust of conquest. They fight to end conquest. They fight to liberate. They fight to let justice arise, and tolerance and good will among all Thy people. They yearn but for the end of battle, for their return to the haven of home.

Some will never return. Embrace these, Father, and receive them, Thy heroic servants, into Thy kingdom.

And for us at home — fathers, mothers, children, wives, sisters, and brothers of brave men overseas — whose thoughts and prayers are ever with them–help us, Almighty God, to rededicate ourselves in renewed faith in Thee in this hour of great sacrifice.

Many people have urged that I call the Nation into a single day of special prayer. But because the road is long and the desire is great, I ask that our people devote themselves in a continuance of prayer. As we rise to each new day, and again when each day is spent, let words of prayer be on our lips, invoking Thy help to our efforts.

Give us strength, too — strength in our daily tasks, to redouble the contributions we make in the physical and the material support of our armed forces.

And let our hearts be stout, to wait out the long travail, to bear sorrows that may come, to impart our courage unto our sons wheresoever they may be.

And, O Lord, give us Faith. Give us Faith in Thee Faith in our sons Faith in each other Faith in our united crusade. Let not the keenness of our spirit ever be dulled. Let not the impacts of temporary events, of temporal matters of but fleeting moment let not these deter us in our unconquerable purpose.

With Thy blessing, we shall prevail over the unholy forces of our enemy. Help us to conquer the apostles of greed and racial arrogancies. Lead us to the saving of our country, and with our sister Nations into a world unity that will spell a sure peace a peace invulnerable to the schemings of unworthy men. And a peace that will let all of men live in freedom, reaping the just rewards of their honest toil.


D-Day Prayer

In 1944, President Franklin D. Roosevelt printed copies of his famous D-Day speech to give to give as gifts. Below is a picture of that 1944 Christmas gift and the transcription of the prayer Roosevelt prayed on D-Day (June 6, 1944).

by President Franklin D. Roosevelt from the white House – June 6, 1944

Last night, when I spoke with you about the fall of Rome, I knew at that moment that troops of the United States and our Allies were crossing the Channel in another and greater operation. It has come to pass with success thus far.

And so, in this poignant hour, I ask you to join with me in prayer:

Almighty God: our sons, pride of our Nation, this day have set upon a mighty endeavor, a struggle to preserve our Republic, our religion, and our civilization, and to set free a suffering humanity.

Lead them straight and true give strength to their arms, stoutness to their hearts, steadfastness in their faith.

They will need Thy blessings. Their road will be long and hard. For the enemy is strong. He may hurl back our forces. Success may not come with rushing speed, but we shall return again and again and we know that by Thy grace, and by the righteousness of our cause, our sons will triumph.

They will be sore tired, but night and by day, without rest – until the victory is won. The darkness will be rent by noise and flame. Men’s souls will be shaken with the violences of war.

For these men are lately drawn from the ways of peace. They fight not for the lust of conquest. They fight to end conquest. They fight to liberate. They fight to let justice arise, and tolerance and good will among all Thy people. They yearn but for the end of battle, for their return to the haven of home.

Some will never return. Embrace these, Father, and receive them, thy heroic servant into Thy kingdom.

And for us at home – fathers, mothers, children, wives, sisters and brothers of brave men overseas – whose thoughts and prayers are ever with them – help us, Almighty God, to rededicate ourselves in renewed faith in Thee in this hour of great sacrifice.

Many people have urged that I call the Nation into a single day of special prayer. But because the road is long and the desire if great, I ask that our people devote themselves in a continuance of prayer. As we rise to each new day, and again when each day is spent, let words of prayer be on our lips, invoking Thy help to our efforts.

Give us strength, too – strength in our daily tasks to redouble the contributions we make in the physical and material support of our armed forces.

And let our hearts be stout, to wait out the long travail, to bear sorrows that may come, to impart our courage unto our sons wheresoever they may be.

And, O Lord, give us faith. Give us faith in Thee faith in our sons, faith in each other faith in our united crusade. Let not the keenness of our spirit ever be dulled. Let no the impacts of temporary events, of temporal matters of but fleeting moment – let not these deter us in our unconquerable purpose.

With Thy blessings, we shall prevail over the unholy forces of our enemy. Help us to conquer the apostles of greed and racial arrogancies. Lead us to the saving of our country, and with our sister nations into a world unity that will spell a sure peace – a peace invulnerable to the schemings of unworthy men. And a peace that will let all men live in freedom, reaping the just rewards of their honest toil. Thy will be done, Almighty God. Amen.


FDR D-Day Prayer

On June 6, 1944, on live radio, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt asked his fellow citizens to join him in prayer as American troops were landing in Normandy, launching one of the most dangerous and complicated battles of World War II. Knowing the terrible odds our troops were facing as they crossed a quarter mile of open beach under heavy Nazi fire, President Roosevelt beseeched God on behalf of an anxious nation in one of the largest mass prayers in history:

“Almighty God: Our sons, pride of our Nation, this day have set upon a mighty endeavor, a struggle to preserve our Republic, our religion, and our civilization, and to set free a suffering humanity. Some will never return. Embrace these, Father, and receive them, Thy heroic servants, into Thy kingdom.”

Friends Board member and New York Times bestselling author Alex Kershaw says of FDR’s D-Day Prayer:

“Of all FDR’s radio broadcasts I believe it was the most powerful – it united every American in their will to win, to support the war effort, to sacrifice. It beautifully encapsulated the Allied and U.S. mission in WWII – ‘they fight not for the lust of conquest…they fight to liberate…’ Liberate they did – those boys drawn from the ways of ‘peace’ and ‘democracy’. Then the U.S. rebuilt Europe and protects it to this day𔆂 June 1944 was – to my mind – America’s finest hour, the peak of its moral authority, and FDR’s prayer the most unifying, most moving articulation of all that the world admired and respected about the U.S.’s mission. It’s a reminder of the spirit of unity that defined the U.S. in WWII and which we so badly need to revive.” (2020 Ruane, Mike “FDR’s moving fireside D-Day prayer to be added to World War II Memorial” The Washington Post)

However, President Roosevelt’s D-Day Prayer was not included on the World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C. when it was completed and dedicated in 2004. In 2014, President Barack Obama signed into law the World War II Memorial Prayer Act (Public Law 113-123) directing that the prayer be added to the World War II Memorial. The legislation stipulated that no federal funds could be used to implement this directive. Therefore, Friends took on the responsibility of designing and funding the project.

A $2 million grant by Lilly Endowment Inc. will allow Friends to complete this effort, begun I 2015, to add President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s D-Day Prayer to the World War II Memorial, restore the “Circle of Remembrance” – the area where the prayer will be placed, and to develop interpretative programming. This effort will complete the World War II Memorial, and the additional programming – both onsite and online – will explore the stories of the everyday men and, in particular, the women, of all backgrounds, who served and without whom victory would not have been possible.

This will be an important and meaningful addition to the Memorial, which is visited by more than 5 million people each year, providing a contemplative space to reflect on and to remember the more than 400,000 American souls lost during World War II.

The D-Day Prayer will be a free-standing element within the restored Circle of Remembrance with the bronze plaque held by granite piers, providing material continuity and lighter feeling.

Friends anticipates a June 6, 2022 dedication of the FDR D-Day Prayer Plaque addition.


Questions

1. Were you surprised to read that President Roosevelt addressed the nation in prayer? Explain your answer.

2. The purpose of an editorial/commentary is to explain, persuade, warn, criticize, entertain, praise or answer. What do you think is the purpose of Warren Kozak’s editorial? Explain your answer.

3. Has Mr. Kozak caused you to think differently about an American president leading our nation in prayer? Explain your answer.

[Note: Presidential prayer has been a part of our American history. President Abraham Lincoln quoted the Bible, Psalm 33:12, “Blessed is the nation whose God is the Lord” in his Presidential proclamation during the Civil War, calling for “a day of national humiliation, fasting and prayer.” Is it good that American presidents no longer call on Almighty God for strength, blessing and mercy?]


Special Operations Outlook 2019 Digital Edition is here!

A parishioner kneels in prayer during the noon mass at St. Vincent de Paul, New York City, N.Y., June 6, 1944. Library of Congress photo

On the morning of June 6, 1944, as Allied forces came ashore on the invasion beaches of Utah, Omaha, Sword, Gold, and Juno, President Franklin D. Roosevelt released a prayer to reassure the American people. Published in afternoon papers across the United States, the prayer was delivered by Roosevelt that evening on the radio. Today it is easy to view the eventual success of D-Day as a foregone conclusion, but at the time that wasn’t the case. For the occasion, Roosevelt didn’t turn to one of his quintessential “fireside chats,” instead asking Americans to join with him in a prayer.

They will need Thy blessings. Their road will be long and hard. For the enemy is strong. He may hurl back our forces. Success may not come with rushing speed, but we shall return again and again and we know that by Thy grace, and by the righteousness of our cause, our sons will triumph.

The complete text of Roosevelt’s prayer is below. Audio of Roosevelt’s delivery of the prayer is available on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-weBUzQleo.

Carrying their full equipment, U.S. Army soldiers come ashore on Utah Beach, June 6, 1944. With the success of the invasion very much in doubt, President Franklin D. Roosevelt asked for Americans to join him in a prayer. U.S. Army photo

My fellow Americans: Last night, when I spoke with you about the fall of Rome, I knew at that moment that troops of the United States and our allies were crossing the Channel in another and greater operation. It has come to pass with success thus far.

And so, in this poignant hour, I ask you to join with me in prayer:

Almighty God: Our sons, pride of our nation, this day have set upon a mighty endeavor, a struggle to preserve our republic, our religion, and our civilization, and to set free a suffering humanity.

Lead them straight and true give strength to their arms, stoutness to their hearts, steadfastness in their faith.

They will need Thy blessings. Their road will be long and hard, for the enemy is strong. He may hurl back our forces. Success may not come with rushing speed, but we shall return again and again and we know that by Thy grace, and by the righteousness of our cause, our sons will triumph.

They will be sore tried, by night and by day, without rest – until the victory is won. The darkness will be rent by noise and flame. Men’s souls will be shaken with the violence of war.

For these men are lately drawn from the ways of peace. They fight not for the lust of conquest. They fight to end conquest. They fight to liberate. They fight to let justice arise, and tolerance and good will among all Thy people. They yearn but for the end of battle, for their return to the haven of home.

Some will never return. Embrace these, Father, and receive them, Thy heroic servants, into Thy kingdom.

And for us at home – fathers, mothers, children, wives, sisters, and brothers of brave men overseas – whose thoughts and prayers are ever with them – help us, Almighty God, to rededicate ourselves in renewed faith in Thee in this hour of great sacrifice.

Many people have urged that I call the nation into a single day of special prayer. But because the road is long and the desire is great, I ask that our people devote themselves in a continuance of prayer. As we rise to each new day, and again when each day is spent, let words of prayer be on our lips, invoking Thy help to our efforts.

Give us strength, too – strength in our daily tasks, to redouble the contributions we make in the physical and the material support of our armed forces.

And let our hearts be stout, to wait out the long travail, to bear sorrows that may come, to impart our courage unto our sons wheresoever they may be.

And, O Lord, give us faith. Give us faith in Thee faith in our sons faith in each other faith in our united crusade. Let not the keenness of our spirit ever be dulled. Let not the impacts of temporary events, of temporal matters of but fleeting moment, let not these deter us in our unconquerable purpose.

With Thy blessing, we shall prevail over the unholy forces of our enemy. Help us to conquer the apostles of greed and racial arrogancies. Lead us to the saving of our country, and with our sister nations into a world unity that will spell a sure peace – a peace invulnerable to the schemings of unworthy men. And a peace that will let all of men live in freedom, reaping the just rewards of their honest toil.


Franklin D. Roosevelt Delivers D-Day Prayer - HISTORY

This Sunday every radio station should play President Franklin D Roosevelt’s national prayer broadcast on the evening American and allied troops had successfully landed in France. D Day was the biggest single event of World War Two.

Hearing an American President (and the most famous liberal Democrat in history) ask the American people to join in prayer and then openly praying to God is an emotional experience. It would be good for America if each year we remembered D Day with President Roosevelt’s prayer.

Newt Gingrich

FDR addressed the nation and asked if they would pray with him. Of course a lot of these clips aren’t from Normandy, but the main theme is Amphibious Assaults and Aerial Combat.

Music: Heart of Courage by Two Steps from Hell.

Clips: The Thin Red Line
Pearl Harbor
Red Tails
Band of Brothers
The Pacific
Saving Private Ryan
Windtalkers
Letters from Iwo Jima
Flags of our Fathers


Obama's Shameful Rejection of FDR's D-Day Prayer

President Barack Obama had bureaucrat Robert Abbey deliver an opinion to a U. S. House committee last week that adding Franklin Roosevelt's D-Day prayer to the nation's World War II Memorial would tarnish the elegance of the memorial and hamper visitors from being moved, educated, and inspired by the memorial, so reports Fox News.

Let's underscore that Abbey said this about FDR's D-Day prayer, which was delivered at the commencement of the invasion of Europe. D-Day was the pivotal event in the European theater in World War II. The invasion was fraught with terrific uncertainty. Roosevelt and Eisenhower, among the nation's leaders, feared for the awful death toll in American and allied lives that the invasion would incur.

Abbey, who serves as the director of the Bureau of Land Management, made his remarks in reaction to a measure sponsored by Congressman Bill Johnson (R-OH) that would add FDR's D-Day prayer to the World War II Memorial. Abbey sought refuge in the Commemorative Works Act, which Abbey claims prohibits a change.

The D-Day invasion offered great hope, in that if successful - and no one then was sure - it would be the beginning of the end of the European war. Americans knew upon hearing the news of the invasion that there would be an awful price paid in American and allied lives. FDR offered his prayer not to rally the nation - the nation was rallied - but to give succor through the call for Providence's blessings.

Roosevelt's prayer was no namby-pamby "bless everyone, even those poor, misguided, Jew-killing, hell-loosing Nazis." No, Roosevelt said this:

They [American and allied troops] will need Thy blessings. Their road will be long and hard. For the enemy is strong. He may hurl back our forces. Success may not come with rushing speed, but we shall return again and again and we know that by Thy grace, and by the righteousness of our cause, our sons will triumph. [Emphasis added]

No moral relativism in World War II. No moronic pleas for the Axis and the allies to - gosh darn it - just find some way to split differences and get along. Roosevelt's prayer was a prayer of steely resolve, a prayer for an undisputed allied victory.

The secularist left, which Mr. Obama belongs, finds any prayer repugnant, but Roosevelt's D-Day prayer must be particularly galling. A public prayer by the nation's chief executive that so clearly calls for a military victory over an enemy. that just doesn't fit with the left's indoctrination of today's Americans, who need to jettison primitive faith. And heaven knows - Opps! - no one can possibly label bad guys the enemy (look at the distortions that Mr. Obama and the left go through to avoid calling jihadists the nation's enemies). Why, that's just positively politically incorrect.

FDR's D-Day prayer can be read here. Better, one can hear FDR reading his prayer to the nation here.

What a sad time in the nation's history. How shameful when Roosevelt's prayer to God for the triumph of good over evil should be objected to by a bureaucrat representing Roosevelt's successor, Barack Obama.

Roosevelt's prayer should be added to the memorial, and the next president - a Republican, let's hope - should commemorate the event.

President Barack Obama had bureaucrat Robert Abbey deliver an opinion to a U. S. House committee last week that adding Franklin Roosevelt's D-Day prayer to the nation's World War II Memorial would tarnish the elegance of the memorial and hamper visitors from being moved, educated, and inspired by the memorial, so reports Fox News.

Let's underscore that Abbey said this about FDR's D-Day prayer, which was delivered at the commencement of the invasion of Europe. D-Day was the pivotal event in the European theater in World War II. The invasion was fraught with terrific uncertainty. Roosevelt and Eisenhower, among the nation's leaders, feared for the awful death toll in American and allied lives that the invasion would incur.

Abbey, who serves as the director of the Bureau of Land Management, made his remarks in reaction to a measure sponsored by Congressman Bill Johnson (R-OH) that would add FDR's D-Day prayer to the World War II Memorial. Abbey sought refuge in the Commemorative Works Act, which Abbey claims prohibits a change.

The D-Day invasion offered great hope, in that if successful - and no one then was sure - it would be the beginning of the end of the European war. Americans knew upon hearing the news of the invasion that there would be an awful price paid in American and allied lives. FDR offered his prayer not to rally the nation - the nation was rallied - but to give succor through the call for Providence's blessings.

Roosevelt's prayer was no namby-pamby "bless everyone, even those poor, misguided, Jew-killing, hell-loosing Nazis." No, Roosevelt said this:

They [American and allied troops] will need Thy blessings. Their road will be long and hard. For the enemy is strong. He may hurl back our forces. Success may not come with rushing speed, but we shall return again and again and we know that by Thy grace, and by the righteousness of our cause, our sons will triumph. [Emphasis added]

No moral relativism in World War II. No moronic pleas for the Axis and the allies to - gosh darn it - just find some way to split differences and get along. Roosevelt's prayer was a prayer of steely resolve, a prayer for an undisputed allied victory.

The secularist left, which Mr. Obama belongs, finds any prayer repugnant, but Roosevelt's D-Day prayer must be particularly galling. A public prayer by the nation's chief executive that so clearly calls for a military victory over an enemy. that just doesn't fit with the left's indoctrination of today's Americans, who need to jettison primitive faith. And heaven knows - Opps! - no one can possibly label bad guys the enemy (look at the distortions that Mr. Obama and the left go through to avoid calling jihadists the nation's enemies). Why, that's just positively politically incorrect.

FDR's D-Day prayer can be read here. Better, one can hear FDR reading his prayer to the nation here.

What a sad time in the nation's history. How shameful when Roosevelt's prayer to God for the triumph of good over evil should be objected to by a bureaucrat representing Roosevelt's successor, Barack Obama.

Roosevelt's prayer should be added to the memorial, and the next president - a Republican, let's hope - should commemorate the event.


FDR's D-Day Prayer

O ne of his sons once referred to Franklin Roosevelt as a &ldquofrustrated clergyman.&rdquo The president, an Episcopalian, loved liturgy and found the cadences of the Book of Common Prayer and of the King James Bible at once stirring and reassuring. And so the time came for Overlord&mdashwhat his friend and colleague Winston Churchill called &ldquothe most difficult and complicated operation that has ever taken place&rdquo&mdashFDR decided to commemorate the moment and address the nation not with a Fireside Chat or a grand speech but with a prayer of his own composition.

The White House distributed the text on the morning of June 6, 1944, so that the afternoon newspapers could publish it and listeners could pray along with Roosevelt when he broadcast that evening. With an estimated audience of 100 million, FDR was to lead what must rank as one of the largest mass prayers in human history. Here are his words, spoken in an hour of peril and of promise.

The prayer in the video above is an abridged version. The complete text appears below.

My fellow Americans: Last night, when I spoke with you about the fall of Rome, I knew at that moment that troops of the United States and our allies were crossing the Channel in another and greater operation. It has come to pass with success thus far.

And so, in this poignant hour, I ask you to join with me in prayer:

Almighty God: Our sons, pride of our Nation, this day have set upon a mighty endeavor, a struggle to preserve our Republic, our religion, and our civilization, and to set free a suffering humanity.

Lead them straight and true give strength to their arms, stoutness to their hearts, steadfastness in their faith.

They will need Thy blessings. Their road will be long and hard. For the enemy is strong. He may hurl back our forces. Success may not come with rushing speed, but we shall return again and again and we know that by Thy grace, and by the righteousness of our cause, our sons will triumph.

They will be sore tried, by night and by day, without rest-until the victory is won. The darkness will be rent by noise and flame. Men’s souls will be shaken with the violences of war.

For these men are lately drawn from the ways of peace. They fight not for the lust of conquest. They fight to end conquest. They fight to liberate. They fight to let justice arise, and tolerance and good will among all Thy people. They yearn but for the end of battle, for their return to the haven of home.

Some will never return. Embrace these, Father, and receive them, Thy heroic servants, into Thy kingdom.

And for us at home — fathers, mothers, children, wives, sisters, and brothers of brave men overseas — whose thoughts and prayers are ever with them–help us, Almighty God, to rededicate ourselves in renewed faith in Thee in this hour of great sacrifice.

Many people have urged that I call the Nation into a single day of special prayer. But because the road is long and the desire is great, I ask that our people devote themselves in a continuance of prayer. As we rise to each new day, and again when each day is spent, let words of prayer be on our lips, invoking Thy help to our efforts.

Give us strength, too — strength in our daily tasks, to redouble the contributions we make in the physical and the material support of our armed forces.

And let our hearts be stout, to wait out the long travail, to bear sorrows that may come, to impart our courage unto our sons wheresoever they may be.

And, O Lord, give us Faith. Give us Faith in Thee Faith in our sons Faith in each other Faith in our united crusade. Let not the keenness of our spirit ever be dulled. Let not the impacts of temporary events, of temporal matters of but fleeting moment let not these deter us in our unconquerable purpose.

With Thy blessing, we shall prevail over the unholy forces of our enemy. Help us to conquer the apostles of greed and racial arrogancies. Lead us to the saving of our country, and with our sister Nations into a world unity that will spell a sure peace a peace invulnerable to the schemings of unworthy men. And a peace that will let all of men live in freedom, reaping the just rewards of their honest toil.


Watch the video: FDR and the role of president