USS Reno CL-96 - History

USS Reno CL-96 - History


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USS Reno CL-96

Walter E. Reno was born in Davis County, Iowa, in 1881, joined the Navy and rose to the rank of lieutenant commander, prior to his death 19 November 1917. In command of Chauncey (DD-3) at that time, he died when his ship was sunk after colliding with the British merchantman Rose off Gibraltar.

The first Reno (DD-303) was named in honor of Walter E. Reno; the second (CL-96) for the city in Nevada.

II

(CL - 96: displacement 8,600 (full load) ; length 5410; beam 532; draft 266; speed 31 knots; complement 688; armament 12 5, 16 40mm., 16 20mm., 8 21 torpedo tubes, 2 depth charge tracks; class Atlanta)

The second Reno (CL-96) was laid down by Bethlehem Steel Co., San Francisco, Calif., 1 August 1941; launched 23 December 1942; sponsored by Mrs. August C. Frohlich; and commissioned 28 December 1943, Capt. Ralph C. Alexander in command.

Following shakedown off San Diego, Reno departed San Francisco, 14 April 1944, to join the 5th Fleet. As an active unit in Vice Adm. Marc A. Mitscher's Task Force 58, she first came in contact with the enemy by supporting air strikes against Marcus Island on 19-20 May. Three days later, she also supported strikes on Wake Island.

During the months of June and July, Reno joined the fast carriers in surprise attacks against Saipan, 11 June, Pagan Island, 12-13 June, and against the Volcano and Bonin Islands - Iwo Jima, Haha Jima, and Chichi Jima - -on 15-16 June. Three days later, she assisted in repelling a large-scale Japanese carrier force attempt to defeat the Allied invasion of Saipan in the Battle of the Philippine Sea.

From 20 June to 8 July, Reno joined in the operations covering the capture of Saipan, then covered landings on Guam from 17-24 July and 2 days later, took part in the strikes against the Palau Islands from the 26th to the 29th. Swinging north again, a final strike was made on the Bonin Islands 4-5 August and on 7 September the task group returned to the Palaus.

Continuing west, Reno participated in raids against Mindanao and adjacent Philippine Islands 9-13 September, supported the Palau invasion 15-20 September, and on the 21st and 22d, supported strikes against Manila and vicinity. Striking Nansei Shoto on 8 October, Reno, with TF 38 came nearer to the home islands of Japan than any other major unit of the U. S. Fleet had been.

During the 3-day strike on Formosa 12-14 October, Reno shot down six enemy planes. At the height of the battle, one torpedo plane crashed and exploded on the Renos main deck aft. Though Turret Six was partially incapacitated by the explosion, the turret captain succeeded in maintaining his fire against the attacking planes and ships.

On 24 October, 4 days after the initial Leyte invasion, while supporting air strikes against the Luzon area, TF 38 was subjected to a large-scale air attack by land planes from Clark Field. The light carrier Princeton (CVL-23) was struck and forced to withdraw from the task group. Reno, assigned to help fight her fires and rescue personnel, came alongside five times but could not remain because of the intense heat and smoke. While Reno evacuated wounded men and tried to bring the fires under control, the listing flight deck of Princeton crushed one of Renos 40mm mounts. Efforts to save the carrier continued; but, after Princetons torpedo warhead stowage area exploded, Reno was ordered to sink her. On 25 October, having rejoined the task force, Reno proceeded north to engage the northern Japanese task force closing for the Battle of Cape Engao - the last engagement in the Battle for Leyte Gulf.

On the night of 3 November, well off San Bernardino Strait, Reno was torpedoed in the port side by Japanese submarine I-41. Towed 1,500 miles to Ulithi for temporary repairs, she then steamed under her own power to Charleston where she entered the Navy Yard 22 March for repairs. Emerging 7 months later, she steamed to Texas, then back to Charleston for the addition of bunk spaces. She reported for "Magic-Carpet" duty and made two runs to Le Havre, France, and back with Army troops.

In early 1946, Reno steamed for Port Angeles, Wash., where she decommissioned, 4 November 1946 and entered the Pacific Reserve Fleet, berthed at Bremerton. Reclassified CLAA-96, 18 March 1949, she remained at Bremerton until her name was struck from the Navy list 1 March 1959 and her hulk was sold, 22 March 1962, to Coal Export Co., New York.

Reno earned three battle stars for World War II service.


USS Reno CL-96 - History

USS Reno , second of the four 6,000-ton Oakland class light cruisers, was built at San Francisco, California. She was commissioned in December 1943, shook down off the U.S. West Coast, and deployed to the Pacific war zone in April 1944. Reno entered combat as an escort for Task Force 58 aircraft carriers raiding Marcus and Wake Islands in May. During June, July and August she participated in the operation to seize Saipan, in the resulting Battle of the Philippine Sea, the invasion of Guam and in carrier raids on other Japanese-held central Pacific islands.

In September and October 1944, as the U.S. offensive against Japan moved into the western Pacific, Reno screened the carriers as they struck targets in the Philippines, the Palaus, the Ryukyus and Formosa. On 24 October, the first day of the Battle of Leyte Gulf, she assisted in efforts to save the bombed and burning USS Princeton , and suffered some topside damage in the attempt. When it was determined that the carrier could not be saved, Reno was ordered to scuttle her with torpedoes. On the following day she took part in the Leyte Gulf's final engagement, the Battle of Cape Engaño.

On 3 November 1944, during continuing operations off the Philippines, Reno was torpedoed on the port side, just aft of amidships, by the Japanese submarine I-41 . She was very badly damaged, with essentially no remaining stability, and only great exertions by her crew and calm seas prevented her loss. Once salvage efforts had stabilized her condition, Reno was towed to the advanced fleet base at Ulithi. After temporary repairs, she was able to steam to the Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina, for a complete renewal. This work was completed soon after the Second World War's end, and Reno then made two round trip voyages to France as part of "Magic Carpet", the operation to bring home American service personnel from the former war zones. She returned to the Pacific in early 1946 and was decommissioned at Bremerton, Washington, in November of that year. USS Reno was reclassified CLAA-96 in March 1949 but remained in the Pacific Reserve Fleet until stricken from the Naval Vessel Register in March 1959. She was sold for scrapping in March 1962.

This page features, and provides links to, all the views we have related to USS Reno (CL-96, later CLAA-96).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Probably photographed in San Francisco Bay, California, at the time of her builder's trials, circa late 1943.
Reno was constructed by the Bethlehem Steel Company's San Francisco shipyard. The company flag is flying from her jackstaff.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 79KB 740 x 580 pixels

Underway on 11 January 1944, probably in San Francisco Bay, California.
Photographed by Naval Air Station Alameda, Calif.
Reno is painted in Camouflage Measure 33, Design 24d.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 78KB 740 x 610 pixels

Outbound in the Golden Gate, while leaving San Francisco Bay, California, 25 January 1944.
Photographed by Naval Air Station Moffett Field, Sunnyvale, California.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 79KB 740 x 605 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Outbound in the Golden Gate, while leaving San Francisco Bay, California, 25 January 1944.
Photographed by Naval Air Station Moffett Field, Sunnyvale, California.
Reno is painted in Camouflage Measure 33, Design 24d.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 83KB 740 x 605 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Steaming through the Golden Gate, while leaving San Francisco Bay, California, 25 January 1944.
Note the Pacific Ocean surf in the distance.
Photographed by Naval Air Station Moffett Field, Sunnyvale, California.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 92KB 740 x 600 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

Underway, circa late 1943 or early 1944.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 122KB 740 x 570 pixels

Following repair of torpedo damage, circa Fall 1945.
Location may be Charleston Harbor, South Carolina.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 61KB 740 x 615 pixels

View on board in 1944, looking aft from the bow while the ship was operating at sea.
Note that the port side forward 40mm twin gun mount appears to be missing. This may indicate that the photograph was taken shortly after Reno was damaged while fighting fires on board USS Princeton (CVL-23), on 24 October 1944.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 54KB 565 x 765 pixels

Ready for launching, at the Bethlehem Steel Company shipyard, San Francisco, California, 23 December 1942.

Courtesy of James Russell, 1972.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 72KB 590 x 765 pixels

In addition to the images presented above, the National Archives appears to hold at least one other view of USS Reno (CL-96). The following list features this image:

The image listed below is NOT in the Naval Historical Center's collections.
DO NOT try to obtain it using the procedures described in our page "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions".

Reproductions of this image should be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system for pictures not held by the Naval Historical Center.


USS Reno (CL 96)

Decommissioned 4 November 1946.
Stricken 1 March 1959.
Sold 22 March 1962 to be broken up for scrap.

Commands listed for USS Reno (CL 96)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1T/Capt. Ralph Clonts Alexander, USN28 Dec 194313 Feb 1945
2Capt. Thomas Francis Darden, Jr., USN13 Feb 194526 Mar 1945
3Capt. Thomas Joseph Hickley, USN26 Mar 194522 May 1945
4T/Capt. Merle Alexander Sawyer, USN22 May 19454 Nov 1946 ( 1 )

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Click here to Submit events/comments/updates for this vessel.
Please use this if you spot mistakes or want to improve this ships page.


Clarence Seaborn Jones - USS Reno CL-96

A Brief Tribute to Another WW2 Veteran.

"Pinky" as he was known, and his family, were our neighbors as I was growing up. By chance they had three boys as did our family. We always joked about the "Smiths, trying to keep up with the Jones's."
Pinky recently passed away at the not-so-old age of 86 years.

The Jones family was like my 2nd. family while growing up. Pinky always referred to me as "Big Al" as Allen is my middle name. They would take me up to Little Horn Canyon where they had a cabin. I rode up with the boys in the back of Pinkys flatbed work truck numerous times. One time we went up in their big Oldsmobile and Pinky wasn't very happy when the muffler was torn off on the very rough road.

They had an old "Tote Goat" motorcycle that son Lyle hauled us around the trails. I remember three of us on the thing once. Pinkys wife, Marilyn , one year baked me "Birthday Cupcakes" with candles as I celebrated a birthday one year at the cabin. A lot of great memories up there on the Little Horn Rivers' source.

Pinky joined the Navy in 1942 and at 18 years of age was stationed on the USS Reno, CL-96, an Atlanta (or Oakland) Class Light Cruiser.

Clarence "Pinky" Seaborn Jones , Nov. 8, 1924 - Jan. 4, 2011

I have no doubt that Pinky was aboard the USS Reno when many of these photos were taken. I remember him telling of a Japanese Plane hitting their ship at one point.
If memory serves me Pinky was a Gunner and manned the big "Pom-Pom" guns.

When we were kids we would sneak into the closet and marvel at Pinky's razor sharp Samuri Sword which he brought home from the Pacific.

We are losing the heritage of our WW2 veterans on a daily basis. It is important to try to record their sacrifices for future generations. So many pass with no recognition of their service.

Some History of the USS Reno. 19 year old Pinky's "home" so many years ago.
(Click on images to enlarge)


Loss of USS Princeton (CVL-23), 24 October 1944Princeton suffers another tremendous explosion, soon after she was hit by a Japanese bomb while operating off the Philippines on 24 October 1944.Photographed at about 1003 hrs. from USS South Dakota (BB-57), with USS Reno (CL-96) passing by closer to the camera.

USS Reno (CL-96) comes alongside the burning USS Princeton (CVL-23) to assist in fighting fires, 24 October 1944.Princeton had been hit by Japanese air attack earlier in the day.

USS Reno (CL-96) stands off the starboard quarter of USS Princeton (CVL-23), while fighting fires on board the bombed carrier, 24 October 1944.Note Reno's forward 5"/38 twin gun mounts in the foreground, with local fire control sights on top.


Battle of Leyte Gulf, October 1944USS Princeton (CVL-23) afire at about 1004 hours on 24 October 1944, soon after she was hit by a Japanese bomb during operations off the Philippines.This view shows smoke rising from the ship's second large explosion, as USS Reno (CL-96) steams by in the foreground.Photographed from USS South Dakota (BB-57).

USS Princeton (CVL-23) blows up after being torpedoed by USS Reno (CL-96) on 24 October 1944.Princeton had been fatally damaged by Japanese air attack earlier in the day, and was scuttled by torpedoing to permit U.S. forces to clear the area

Record of Japanese Imperial Navy Submarine #I-41

3 November 1944:Off San Bernardino Strait, Philippines. At midnight, the I-41's lookouts sight what they take to be an aircraft carrier. LtCdr Kondo sets up and fires a salvo of Type 95 torpedoes. One hits the light cruiser USS RENO (CL-96) in the port side. The RENO takes on a 16-degree list, but is later pumped out and towed by the tug USS ZUNI (ATF-95) 700 miles to Ulithi for temporary repairs.

18 November 1944:East of Samar. During an ASW patrol in the Philippine Sea, Task Group 30-7's USS ANZIO (CVE-57) is alerted to the presence of a Japanese submarine in her operating area by an "Ultra" signals-intelligence message. The ANZIO's aircraft conduct an ASW sweep. One of the aircraft reports a radar contact on a submarine on the surface. After a 14-hour hunt, Cdr R. Cullinan's LAWRENCE C. TAYLOR (DE-415), in a coordinated depth charge attack with her sister-ship the USS MELVIN R. NAWMAN (DE-416) and two planes from the ANZIO, sink the I-41 at 12-44N, 130-42E.
2 December 1944: I-41 Presumed lost with all hands off the Philippines.

USS Reno under salvage after she was torpedoed by the Japanese submarine I-41 off the Philippines on 3 November 1944.Photographed on 5 November, with USS Zuni (ATF-95) alongside.Note burned paintwork on and around her after five-inch gun mounts, oil streaming off to port, and boats nearby.Reno's starboard torpedo tubes, mounted on the main deck alongside the after superstructure, have been pushed over the side to lighten the ship.

Reno II(CL-96: dp. 8,600 (f.) 1. 541'0" b. 53'2" dr. 26'6" s. 31 k. cpl. 688 a. 12 5", 16 40mm., 16 20mm., 8 21" tt., 2 dct. cl. Atlanta)

The second Reno (CL-96) was laid down by Bethlehem Steel Co., San Francisco, Calif., 1 August 1941 launched 23 December 1942 sponsored by Mrs. August C. Frohlich and commissioned 28 December 1943, Capt. Ralph C. Alexander in command.Following shakedown off San Diego, Reno departed San Francisco, 14 April 1944, to join the 5th Fleet. As an active unit in Viee Adm. Mare A. Mitseher's Task Foree 58, she first eame in contact with the enemy by supporting air strikes against Mareus Island on 19-20 May. Three days later she al.so supported strikes on Wake Island.During the months of June and July, Reno joined the fast carriers in surprise attacks against Saipan, 11 June, Pagan Island, 12-13 June, and against the Voleano and Bonin Islands—Iwo Jima, Haha Jima, and Chiehi Jima—on 15-16 June. Three days later she asisted in repelling a large-scale Japanese carrier force attempt to defeat the Allied invasion of Saipan in the Battle of the Philippine Sea.From 20 June to 8 July Reno joined in the operations covering the capture of Saipan, then covered landings on Guam from 17-24 July and 2 days later took part in the strikes against the Palau Islands from the 26th to the 29th. Swinging north again, a final strike was made on the Bonin Islands 4-5 August and on 7 September the task group returned to the Palaus.Continuing west, Reno participated in raids against Mindanao and adjacent Philippine Islands 9-13 September, supported the Palatl Invasion 15-20 September, and on the 21st and 22d supported strikes against Manila and vicinity. Striking Nansei Shoto on 8 October, Reno, with TF 38 eame nearer to the home islands of Japan than any other major unit of the U.S. Fleet had been.

During the 3-day strike on Formosa 12-14 October, Reno shot down six enemy planes. At the height of the battle, one torpedo plane crashed and exploded on the Reno's main deek aft. Though Turret Six was partially ineapaeitated by the explosion, the turret captain sueeeeded in maintaining his fire against the attacking planes and ships.

On 24 October, 4 days after the initial Leyte invasion while supporting air strikes against the Luzon area, TF 38 was subjected to a large-scale air attack bv land planes from Clark Field. The light carrier Princeton was struck and forced to withdraw from the task group. Reno, assigned to help fight her fires and rescue personnel, came alongside five times but could not remain because of the intense heat and smoke. While Reno evacuated wounded men and tried to bring thefires under control, the listing flight deek of Prineeton erushed one of Reno's 40mm. mounts. Efforts to save the carrier continued but, after Princeton's torpedo warhead stowage area exploded, Reno was ordered to sink her.


Clarence Seaborn Jones - USS Reno CL-96

A Brief Tribute to Another WW2 Veteran.

"Pinky" as he was known, and his family, were our neighbors as I was growing up. By chance they had three boys as did our family. We always joked about the "Smiths, trying to keep up with the Jones's."
Pinky recently passed away at the not-so-old age of 86 years.

The Jones family was like my 2nd. family while growing up. Pinky always referred to me as "Big Al" as Allen is my middle name. They would take me up to Little Horn Canyon where they had a cabin. I rode up with the boys in the back of Pinkys flatbed work truck numerous times. One time we went up in their big Oldsmobile and Pinky wasn't very happy when the muffler was torn off on the very rough road.

They had an old "Tote Goat" motorcycle that son Lyle hauled us around the trails. I remember three of us on the thing once. Pinkys wife, Marilyn , one year baked me "Birthday Cupcakes" with candles as I celebrated a birthday one year at the cabin. A lot of great memories up there on the Little Horn Rivers' source.

Pinky joined the Navy in 1942 and at 18 years of age was stationed on the USS Reno, CL-96, an Atlanta (or Oakland) Class Light Cruiser.

Clarence "Pinky" Seaborn Jones , Nov. 8, 1924 - Jan. 4, 2011

I have no doubt that Pinky was aboard the USS Reno when many of these photos were taken. I remember him telling of a Japanese Plane hitting their ship at one point.
If memory serves me Pinky was a Gunner and manned the big "Pom-Pom" guns.

When we were kids we would sneak into the closet and marvel at Pinky's razor sharp Samuri Sword which he brought home from the Pacific.

We are losing the heritage of our WW2 veterans on a daily basis. It is important to try to record their sacrifices for future generations. So many pass with no recognition of their service.

Some History of the USS Reno. 19 year old Pinky's "home" so many years ago.
(Click on images to enlarge)


Loss of USS Princeton (CVL-23), 24 October 1944Princeton suffers another tremendous explosion, soon after she was hit by a Japanese bomb while operating off the Philippines on 24 October 1944.Photographed at about 1003 hrs. from USS South Dakota (BB-57), with USS Reno (CL-96) passing by closer to the camera.

USS Reno (CL-96) comes alongside the burning USS Princeton (CVL-23) to assist in fighting fires, 24 October 1944.Princeton had been hit by Japanese air attack earlier in the day.

USS Reno (CL-96) stands off the starboard quarter of USS Princeton (CVL-23), while fighting fires on board the bombed carrier, 24 October 1944.Note Reno's forward 5"/38 twin gun mounts in the foreground, with local fire control sights on top.


Battle of Leyte Gulf, October 1944USS Princeton (CVL-23) afire at about 1004 hours on 24 October 1944, soon after she was hit by a Japanese bomb during operations off the Philippines.This view shows smoke rising from the ship's second large explosion, as USS Reno (CL-96) steams by in the foreground.Photographed from USS South Dakota (BB-57).

USS Princeton (CVL-23) blows up after being torpedoed by USS Reno (CL-96) on 24 October 1944.Princeton had been fatally damaged by Japanese air attack earlier in the day, and was scuttled by torpedoing to permit U.S. forces to clear the area

Record of Japanese Imperial Navy Submarine #I-41

3 November 1944:Off San Bernardino Strait, Philippines. At midnight, the I-41's lookouts sight what they take to be an aircraft carrier. LtCdr Kondo sets up and fires a salvo of Type 95 torpedoes. One hits the light cruiser USS RENO (CL-96) in the port side. The RENO takes on a 16-degree list, but is later pumped out and towed by the tug USS ZUNI (ATF-95) 700 miles to Ulithi for temporary repairs.

18 November 1944:East of Samar. During an ASW patrol in the Philippine Sea, Task Group 30-7's USS ANZIO (CVE-57) is alerted to the presence of a Japanese submarine in her operating area by an "Ultra" signals-intelligence message. The ANZIO's aircraft conduct an ASW sweep. One of the aircraft reports a radar contact on a submarine on the surface. After a 14-hour hunt, Cdr R. Cullinan's LAWRENCE C. TAYLOR (DE-415), in a coordinated depth charge attack with her sister-ship the USS MELVIN R. NAWMAN (DE-416) and two planes from the ANZIO, sink the I-41 at 12-44N, 130-42E.
2 December 1944: I-41 Presumed lost with all hands off the Philippines.

USS Reno under salvage after she was torpedoed by the Japanese submarine I-41 off the Philippines on 3 November 1944.Photographed on 5 November, with USS Zuni (ATF-95) alongside.Note burned paintwork on and around her after five-inch gun mounts, oil streaming off to port, and boats nearby.Reno's starboard torpedo tubes, mounted on the main deck alongside the after superstructure, have been pushed over the side to lighten the ship.

Reno II(CL-96: dp. 8,600 (f.) 1. 541'0" b. 53'2" dr. 26'6" s. 31 k. cpl. 688 a. 12 5", 16 40mm., 16 20mm., 8 21" tt., 2 dct. cl. Atlanta)

The second Reno (CL-96) was laid down by Bethlehem Steel Co., San Francisco, Calif., 1 August 1941 launched 23 December 1942 sponsored by Mrs. August C. Frohlich and commissioned 28 December 1943, Capt. Ralph C. Alexander in command.Following shakedown off San Diego, Reno departed San Francisco, 14 April 1944, to join the 5th Fleet. As an active unit in Viee Adm. Mare A. Mitseher's Task Foree 58, she first eame in contact with the enemy by supporting air strikes against Mareus Island on 19-20 May. Three days later she al.so supported strikes on Wake Island.During the months of June and July, Reno joined the fast carriers in surprise attacks against Saipan, 11 June, Pagan Island, 12-13 June, and against the Voleano and Bonin Islands—Iwo Jima, Haha Jima, and Chiehi Jima—on 15-16 June. Three days later she asisted in repelling a large-scale Japanese carrier force attempt to defeat the Allied invasion of Saipan in the Battle of the Philippine Sea.From 20 June to 8 July Reno joined in the operations covering the capture of Saipan, then covered landings on Guam from 17-24 July and 2 days later took part in the strikes against the Palau Islands from the 26th to the 29th. Swinging north again, a final strike was made on the Bonin Islands 4-5 August and on 7 September the task group returned to the Palaus.Continuing west, Reno participated in raids against Mindanao and adjacent Philippine Islands 9-13 September, supported the Palatl Invasion 15-20 September, and on the 21st and 22d supported strikes against Manila and vicinity. Striking Nansei Shoto on 8 October, Reno, with TF 38 eame nearer to the home islands of Japan than any other major unit of the U.S. Fleet had been.

During the 3-day strike on Formosa 12-14 October, Reno shot down six enemy planes. At the height of the battle, one torpedo plane crashed and exploded on the Reno's main deek aft. Though Turret Six was partially ineapaeitated by the explosion, the turret captain sueeeeded in maintaining his fire against the attacking planes and ships.

On 24 October, 4 days after the initial Leyte invasion while supporting air strikes against the Luzon area, TF 38 was subjected to a large-scale air attack bv land planes from Clark Field. The light carrier Princeton was struck and forced to withdraw from the task group. Reno, assigned to help fight her fires and rescue personnel, came alongside five times but could not remain because of the intense heat and smoke. While Reno evacuated wounded men and tried to bring thefires under control, the listing flight deek of Prineeton erushed one of Reno's 40mm. mounts. Efforts to save the carrier continued but, after Princeton's torpedo warhead stowage area exploded, Reno was ordered to sink her.


USS Reno CL-96 - History

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Ship: USS RENO (CL 96)
Cause of Damage: Submarine Torpedo
Date: 3 November 1944
Place: Off Luzon
Class: ATLANTA (CL 51)
Standard Displacement: 6000 tons
Length Overall: 541'
Extreme Beam: 53'
Draft Before Damage: 20' 10 1/2"
Launched: 23 December, 1942

1. A submarine torpedo detonated at about frame 92, port, in way of shell strake "C", and caused serious local damage. Shell plating and supporting structure was ruptured between frames 88 and 97, a distance of about 33 feet, and from "B" strake to "F" strake, a distance of about 22 feet. Damage to adjacent plating extended between frames 84 and 103 and from "A" strake to the main deck. The main, 2nd and lst platform decks were destroyed between frames 88 and 97, port. This damage as well as that to the main deck and interior structure is shown on Plate 4 and Photos 2 and 3. Extensive flooding resulted in a condition of negative initial stability, however, damage control measures undertaken by the ship's force and ZUNI (ATF 95) enabled the ship to be towed 700 miles to Ulithi. Despite the marked loss of strength at frame 93, port, no progressive structural failures were noted during this passage in heavy weather.

2. No drydoaking facilities were available at Ulithi. Temporary repairs were undertaken by VESTAL (AR 4) and RENO with the aim of making the best possible improvement in stability, watertight integrity, and longitudinal, transverse and local strength. Immediately upon arrival and throughout repairs divers were used to determine the extent of damage, both in the vicinity of the explosion and to the rest of the underwater body and appurtenances.

a. Stability During Repairs (Refer to Plate 4).

On arrival, RENO had 1800 tons of flood water and GM had been reduced from 3.5' to 1.4'. B3 had been dewatered, but B4 was completely flooded. Flooding extended aft to bulkhead 110 on the 2nd platform, and frame 103 on the lst platform. C-201L and C-202L were flooded to the waterline. Calculations of the stability condition showed that it would be necessary to remove 200 tons of topside weight before it would be safe to accept the free surface in the after engine room resulting from unwatering flooded spaces aft to bring the

2nd deck above the waterline. Accordingly, about 200 tons of the highest practicable topside weights were removed. A careful record of weight and moment of removed items was made for use in a continuous calculation of stability. Forward tanks A-1W, A-2W, A-4F, A-5F, A-7F, A-8F, A-608F and A-609F were-ballasted solid with oil or water. Then, C-412M and C-415M were unwatered to bring the 2nd deck above the waterline. C-201L and C-202L were dewatered. Later, the ship was listed to starboard to facilitate repairs near the waterline.
Structural Repairs (Plates 5, 6, 7 and 8)
The section modulus of the damaged section was calculated using information obtained from examination of the underwater body by divers. This calculation indicated that it would be possible to restore about 75% of the strength of the intact section. As shown on Plate 6, damaged areas of the main and 2nd decks were replaced and two shell wrapper plates were installed below the port sheer atrake. Additional large longitudinals were installed on the shell and and main and 2nd decks (Photos 4, 5). These girders extended about 30' beyond each end of the damaged area. Their ends were tapered over a length of 8' and anti-tripping brackets were installed in way of each transverse structural member. In order to improve stiffness and transverse strength in way of the damage, a damaged section of bulkhead 96 was replaced and bulkheads 88 and 96 were strengthened by adding vertical bracketed 8" channel sections in way of existing stiffeners. Web frame 92 was replaced and 10" H columns were installed between the deep main and second deck longitudinats at each transverse web frame (Photo 5). 8" I stanchions were installed to replace damaged stanchions supporting turret 4. Holding bulkheads 77 in B-3 and 103 in C-412 and C-311AC were shored.
Watertight Integrity.
In addition to the improvement in watertight integrity resulting from the repairs to decks, shell, and bulkheads, damaged access closures, ventilation ducts, and piping were repaired or blanked.

3. After completion of these repairs, RENO was towed to Manus and drydocked in AHSD 2, where temporary repairs to the underwater body were made by WHITNEY (AD4), Navy Repair Unit 3205 and RENO. The care taken to align replacement members with original structure and to achieve continuity in way of all connections is shown in Plates 7, 8 and Photos 6, 7. Stanchions were installed at frames 90, 92 and 94 1/2 to compensate for the bulkhead which was not replaced at frame 90 and to provide additional stiffness (Photo 8).

Photo 2: RENO (CL 96) Damage, frames 86-94. Note intact 3.75" STS plating.
Photo 3: RENO (CL 96) Looking aft at underwater damage, frames 93-103. Note above water repairs made at Ulithi.
Photo 4: RENO (CL 96) Looking aft at logitudinal strengthening members on shell and main deck.
Photo 5: RENO (CL 96) Looking to port and aft showing replacement structure.
Photo 6: RENO (CL 96) Fairing of longitudinals and transverse frames to undamaged original structure.
Photo 7: RENO (CL 96) Looking forward from frame 99. Showing method of fitting continuous longitudinals and intercoastal transverse floors outside damaged shell plating.
Photo 8: RENO (CL 96) Interior repairs. Note deep frames 92 and 94 1/2 at shell columns fabricated from double 8" x 3" channels supporting 2nd deck, columns supporting armored bhd. 90, and deep longitudinals with bracketed end connections under 2nd deck.
Photo 9: RENO (CL 96) Looking forward at after end of replacement plating. Note watertight seal on port stern tube.
Plate 4: Diagram of torpedo damage to hull and structures.
Plate 5: Frame 93 structure before damage.
Plate 6: diagram of structural reinforcement and plating in area of damage performed in forward area.
Plate 7: Repairs to shell plating, frames 80-105
Plate 8: Shell plating repair performed at Manus.

The Below photos were not included with the original report but are provided for additional reference
NH 63431: November 5th, 1944 two days after the torpedo hit. Fleet Tug Zuni ATF-95 is alongside to port rendering assistance. Note the fuel oil streaming from the aft end of the ship
NH98473: Also photographed on November 5th, this photograph visible shows how close to capsizing Reno was
80-G-287559: Another shot highlighting the fuel oil streaming from the ship. Note also that some work to increase her stability has been done as the starboard side torpedo tubes have been jettisoned.
80-G-287568: Another photograph showing Zuni alongside

SOURCE:
National Archives & Records Administration, Seattle Branch
Record Group 181, Entry 59A-271 "13th Naval District Bremerton, Washington" General Correspondance 1947-1958
"Structural Repairs in Forward Areas During World War II" -BuShips Booklet dated December 1949.


Mystery person saves WWII warship’s flag from being burned by looters

A flag that once flew upon the mast of the USS Reno was stolen from the town hall of the Nevada city from which.

A flag that once flew upon the mast of the USS Reno was stolen from the town hall of the Nevada city from which it got its name- and has since been returned safely.

The flag, which flew in combat conditions during World War II, was reportedly taken during the ransacking of city hall- but with good intent.

According to NBC News 4 reporter Kenzie Margiott, a package addressed to her was delivered to the station.

I opened the package with extreme caution, and inside I found a tattered flag with a manila tag labeled, 󈨙-55-A USS Reno CL-96,’ and a handwritten note in Sharpie that read, ‘Needed protecting. Looters were flag burning. R.I.P George Floyd.’”

Not long after realizing the significance of the event, Margiott notified Reno Vice Mayor Devon Reese.

Reese, who was no doubt disturbed by the gutting of his office, reportedly had tears in his eyes when he saw the flag.

“I’m really happy and thankful they sent it to you and that we can return it to the city and the citizens of Reno,” Reese said.

Margiott was also moved by the incident.

“I am humbled that someone took it upon themselves to do the right thing and return the flag,” she said.

First commissioned in 1943, the USS Reno (CL-96) was an updated Atlanta-class light cruiser -sometimes referred to as an “Oakland-class”- designed and built to specialize in anti aircraft warfare. She was the first warship to be named for the city of Reno, Nevada.


USS Reno CL-96 - History

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Reno CL 96 cruise book during World War II. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Battle Cry of the Reno Sheet Music
  • message from the Captain
  • Liberty Headquarters Treasure Island Days
  • Commissioning Ceremony December 28, 1943
  • Personnel Inspections
  • Shipboard Life at Sea
  • Some Divisional Photos with Names
  • Crossing the Equator
  • Awards and Presentations
  • Rescue at Sea
  • 1944 Crew Roster Names, Rate and Rank

Over 46 Photos on 54 pages.

Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this Light Cruiser during World War II.


USS Reno WWII flag stolen from city hall during Nevada protest returned: 'Needed protecting'

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com.

An anonymous person returned an American flag from a World War II battleship that was stolen from the Reno City Hall in Nevada during protests seeking justice for George Floyd, according to a local news station on Tuesday.

Although the majority of protests were peaceful, a small group of demonstrators proceeded to deface the old police headquarters and loot downtown businesses. Some people were also burning an American flag, authorities said.

This photo provided by KRNV journalist Kenzie Margiott shows a note addressed to Margiott and a flag from a World War II battleship after it was anonymously returned. (Kenzie Margiott via AP)

City officials discovered the glass display that housed the artifact from the USS Reno had been smashed and the flag – which had been donated to the city nearly 75 years ago – was gone following Saturday night's riots.

“It’s an incredible gut punch to take,” city spokesman Jon Humbert said.

Three days later, KRNV reported, the flag was inside a package anonymously delivered to the TV station and addressed to journalist Kenzie Margiott with a note in Sharpie that read: “Needed protecting. Looters were flag burning. R.I.P George Floyd.”

The tattered flag had a manila tag labeled, “85-55-A USS Reno CL-96."

The flag was packaged and sent to addressed to KRNV journalist Kenzie Margiott in Reno, Nev., Tuesday, June 2, 2020. (Kenzie Margiott via AP)

Margiott said she called the city immediately and the vice mayor arrived within the hour with tears in his eyes.

“I’m really happy and thankful they sent it to you and that we can return it to the city and the citizens of Reno,” Vice Mayor Devon Reese said.

The men of the USS Reno were credited with shooting down five enemy airplanes and assisted in the downing of at least two more at Iwo Jima.

Two sailors from Reno served on the USS Reno: Lt. Henry L. Clayton and Yeoman Second Class Glen A. Spoon. The battleship was inactivated on June 1, 1946, and scrapped three years later.


Our Newsletter

Product Description

USS Reno CL 96

World War II Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Reno cruise book during World War II. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Battle Cry of the Reno Sheet Music
  • message from the Captain
  • Liberty Headquarters Treasure Island Days
  • Commissioning Ceremony December 28, 1943
  • Personnel Inspections
  • Shipboard Life at Sea
  • Some Divisional Photos with Names
  • Crossing the Equator
  • Awards and Presentations
  • Rescue at Sea
  • 1944 Crew Roster Names, Rate and Rank

Over 46 Photos on 54 pages.

Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this Light Cruiser during World War II.

Additional Bonus:

  • Several Additional Images of the USS Reno during the World War II era (National Archives)
  • 22 Minute Audio " American Radio Mobilizes the Homefront " WWII (National Archives)
  • 22 Minute Audio " Allied Turncoats Broadcast for the Axis Powers " WWII (National Archives)
  • 20 Minute Audio of a " 1967 Equator Crossing " (Not this ship but the Ceremony is Traditional)
  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.

    Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
    • Self contained CD no software to load.
    • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
    • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
    • Bookmark your favorite pages.
    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
    • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

    The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

    If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.



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