Ophir Railroad Station - History

Ophir Railroad Station - History


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Ophir Railroad Station - History

Just a few blocks from the heart of downtown Tooele City, the museum embraces memories of the days when the community transitioned into the industrial age.On the museum property is Engine #11, which you can climb aboard. It was one of the original steam engines that carried miners up to the International Smelting and Refining Company that overlooked Tooele Valley from 1910 to 1972. Inside the actual museum, which served as the railway’s station, you’ll find fascinating remnants of those mining days. Additional railcars next to the museum are filled with artifacts and memorabilia form World War II, and the Korean and Vietnam wars.

The Tooele Valley Railroad Museum is open late May through Labor Day on Tuesdays through Saturdays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free. For more information call (435) 882-2836

We are approximately 35 minutes west of Salt Lake City, UT. Take Interstate 80 west to Exit 99 at Lake Point. Proceed 12 miles south on State Route 36 (Main Street Tooele) to Tooele. Turn left at Vine Street and proceed east for four blocks to Broadway street. The museum is on the left. Parking is available at the museum’s east entrance on Broadway.


Photo, Print, Drawing Trestle of narrow gauge railroad near Ophir, Colorado

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Ophir

Some officers of Camp Douglas found out that Native Americans used homemade silver and lead bullets and ornaments. Troops of General Connor checked the region and find some primitive mining sites on the western slopes of the Oquirrh Mountains in 1865.

There must have been some literate prospectors there, because one of the mines was named after the land of King Solomon's mining land, Ophir. The new prosperous city had more than 6000 inhabitants. Lead, silver, zinc and some gold was extracted from the mines. The city had its own railroad line, post office, saloons, newspaper, hotels, a town hall combined with a fire station.

Some of the mines are still operating today, but the number of the population decreased radically. According to the census of 1970 the town had 76 inhabitants. Today it has 23. One of them is the sheriff.

Several of the old houses were transformed into souvenir shops and other old buildings were recently remodeled. The town is full of "NO TRESPASSING" signs (including the city park): many contemporary "prospectors" tried to transform the standing old buildings into souvenirs. The abandoned mining structures, coaches, remains of old bridges, the "no trespassing" signs make the narrow canyon a place from a Stephen King novel.


Town of Mancos

Please see our Cowboy History, Indian History, and Mancos Valley pages on this site for further information.

The town of Mancos was laid out in 1881. It consisted of the school house, a few cabins, and a store set up by George Bauer (Ellis, 1999:13). By 1885 the town boasted C.J.Scharnhorst, the shoemaker Snyder’s blacksmith shop C.M. Vetts’ grocery store George Bauer’s general merchandise, now in a larger building the George Bauer Bank the post office which had been moved into town a log hotel owned by D.H. Lemmon and two saloons (Freeman, 2005:35). A.C. Honaker, who had arrived in 1881, contracted to build the first bridge across the Mancos River southeast of the school house (Ellis, 1999:16).

Meanwhile a community was developing in Webber Canyon to the south. The first settlers there had been a Mr. Webber and his wife around 1878. One of Mancos’ great mysteries is the death of Mr. Webber under undiscovered circumstances. Later the canyon was settled largely by Mormons. Joseph Stanford Smith settled there with in his family in 1881 and spread the word to many other families who homesteaded in the canyon. A Mormon church was built there in 1884 (Freeman, 2005:30, 30-38). A school house was built in Webber Canyon in 1891 (Ellis, 1999:37).

In the 1880s the Methodists had a congregation meeting in a private home and held Sunday school in the old log school house, later moving services to other school locations. They were served by circuit riders who preached their sermons. Sometime after 1883, when Reverend W.J. Sage came to organize the parish, a church was built. In 1899 the Methodists moved their church to its current location (Ellis, 1976:105-106).

The early Episcopalians also held services in private homes (Ellis, 1976:106) and possibly in the town hall or the Knights of Pythias building (“Brief History,”n.d.:1). Various visiting ministers offered services. James K. Comings was the first to provide permanent services when he moved to Mancos in 1898, but a permanent church was not built until 1913 (Ellis, 1976:107).

The First Baptist Church of Mancos was organized in 1899, preceded by an organization called ”Gospel Tabernacle.” A church building was built the same year. When they later sold that building to the Catholics, the church congregation met in the Odd Fellows Hall until the present church was built in 1922 (Ellis, 1976:111).

Little is recorded about the early Catholic community in Mancos. The first Catholic priest assigned to Mancos was Reverend Joseph Bruner in 1912. Under his guidance, they purchased the old Baptist church in 1915, establishing St. Rita’s Catholic Church and making improvements in the building and grounds (Ellis, 1976:110).

The railroad reached Mancos in 1891. Rails had come to Durango ten years earlier. The Denver and Rio Grande Southern brought new progress and development to the area for many years (Freeman, 2005:208). A new railway station was completed in 1896, and new shipping pens were located below the depot to handle the growing livestock business (Freeman, 2005:209).

Mining continued on a small scale. In the 1880s prospectors had searched for gold, and some small placer operations existed. About 1892 Captain George A. Jackson prospected the Mancos River, among others, and started a placer operation in the Mancos area. A rumor that he had found rich ore spread, and gold fever took hold. Ellis (1999:39) writes, “ It wasn’t long until the streets of the little town were alive with men with gold pans, burros, picks and shovels, all headed for the hills to seek their fortunes in gold. The mining claims with names such as Georgia Girl, Silver Falls, North Star, Timberline, Hobo, Sundown, and Belle of East Mancos dotted the mountainsides. There were some strikes, but “few, if any, ever found real riches” (Ellis, 199939-41).

The Mancos Times, the first newspaper, was started in 1893 with C.M. Danford as editor. Veteran newspaperman W.H. Kelly took over after three months, and it was he who would tout the mining potential of the Mancos area, perhaps overzealously (Ellis, 1999:34-37, 39). In any case, the mining excitement brought employment and financial prosperity for local businesses (Ellis 1999:41).

By 1893 Mancos had added two doctors, a dentist, another boot and shoemaker, a barber, a contractor, a druggest, a saddle and harness shop, a steel and ironworks, a billiards hall, two liveries, and a lumber yard. Mrs. Hyde’s Restaurant served meals for twenty-five cents (Ellis, 1976:37-38).

The town of Mancos was incorporated in 1894 with George Bauer as mayor. The incorporation had been hastened by “horse racing in the streets and much disorder about town” (Freeman, 2005:209).

Following are resources which give additional information on the history of the Mancos Valley and its environs:

The town of Mancos was incorporated in 1894 with George Bauer as mayor. The incorporation had been hastened by “horse racing in the streets and much disorder about town” (Freeman, 2005:209).

Following are resources which give additional information on the history of the Mancos Valley and its environs:

“Brief History of St. Paul’s: Mancos, Colorado.” Unpublished paper, n.d.

EllIs, Darrel. Come Back to My Valley, Volume Two. Mancos, CO: Fifth Raccoon, 2004.

Ellis, Fern. Come Back to My Valley: Historical Remembrances of Mancos, Colorado. Cortez, CO: Cortez Printers, 1976, reprint 1999.

Freeman, Ira S. A History of Montezuma County. Cheshire, England: Trafford, 2005.

Reddert, Lottie W. Cow Talk: The Memories of George W. Menefee: An Early Day Cattleman of the Southwest. Dolores, CO: Dolores Star, 1976.

Rockwell, Wilson. The Utes: A Forgotten People. Montrose: Western Reflections Publishing, 2006.

Ubbelohde, Carl, Maxine Benson, and Duane A. Smith. A Colorado History. Boulder, CO: Pruett Publishing, 1982.


Ophir Railroad Station - History

Modeler's Page

Museum members can now submit photos of their modeling efforts for display on this page. The photos must be submitted via email in jpeg or tiff format to [email protected] Each modeler is limited to two photos. All photos are the property of the modelers listed below and may not be reproduced without written permission of the modeler.

1) Jim Kottkamp's Ridgway Grande Scenic (RGS) is still under construction. This photo was taken on the indoor section of the layout. The photo is of an Accucraft K-27 on his scratchbuilt 39 1/2 inch long (65 scale feet) tunrtable in the heart of Ridgway. The scale is 1:20.3. The turntable was built from plans of the Alamosa turntable.

2) The late Keith Koch has modeled in a number of scales. The left photo is a 1/24 scale model of the RGS Plow Flanger 2 while the right photo shows his Nn3 diorama of Red Mountain Town. This diorama is now located in the Ouray County Museum.

3) The late John Weiss did his modeling on his friend Eddie Carroll's layout which appeared on page 82 of the May/June 2010 Gazette. John took the photos below.

4) John and Mike McKenzie model the RGS in Sn3. You may have seen their portable layout at a National Narrow Gauge Convention. The photos here are Vance Junction on the left and the West Durango yard on the right. They are Business Members: http://mckenziebrotherstimberco.com/

5) Craig Brantley has a freelanced D&RGW / RGS model railroad in O scale. Visit Craig's railroad web site: http://www.drgw-sd.com.

6) Don Paulson models in HO/HOn3 with a 40' x 30' layout loosely based on the RGS/D&RGW. The left photo shows the Ophir tram house and station while the right hand photo shows a night shot of the Salida station. You can visit Don's railroad web site at http://www.ouraynet.com/denverandsouthwestern/

7) Craig Symington models in HOn3. His photo below shows Vance Junction. You can visit Craig's railroad web site at http://www.riograndesouthern.com/

8) Scott McLeod models the Rio Grande Southern in HOn3. Scott lives in St. Paul, MN

9) Norm Delucchi models the RGS in Sn3. Here are two photos of his model of the Pro Patria Mill in Rico

10) Ken Neufeld models the RGS in Sn3. Below are shown photos of No 40 and No 41 at Vance Junction and Motor No 4 at Dallas Divide.


11) Craig Raymond models the RGS in Sn3. The photos below show Ophir in 1939 with full S-scale bridge 45-A and Vanadium with full S-scale Vanadium Mill.

12) Mark Evans models the RGS in Sn3. The first photo shows the current progress on the yard looking from the wye towards the depot. The engine terminal will be located just beyond the depot in the corner. The yard is 35 feet long. Mark has recreated many of the RGS outfit cars in S scale. The second photo shows a scratchbuilt model of RGS plow-flanger 02.

13) Tom Caldwell models in Sn3 and plans to build a layout based on the Colorado Narrow gauge. The false front building is a Wild West Scale Model builders kit, the ore bin is an Anvil Mountain Models kit and thefreight wagon is a Grizzly Mountain Engineering kit.


14) Bob Meyer's O-scale layout is 34' x 24' and models the D&RGW standard gauge in the late 40s-50s era very loosely based on the section in Utah from Helper to Soldier Summit. The photo below shows a Rio Grande M-68 4-8-4. These were the Rio Grande's last new passenger locomotives and built by Baldwin in 1937.

15) Bill Busacca shared his Sn3 scratch built Motor No. 1. It received first place in the internal combustion category at the Houston Narrow Gauge Symposium a few years ago, .

All original materials, text, and images Copyright 2020 by the Ridgway Railroad Museum. All rights reserved. Unauthorized use or reproduction of any materials, text and images without the express written permission of the Ridgway Railroad Museum is strictly prohibited.


Timeline

Ophir, Before The Railroad

1870
There were silver claims in the Ophir district, including the Mountain Lion, the Petalume, the Silver Chief, the Tampico, and the Blue Wing. The first claim in the Ophir district was filed on August 23, 1870, as the Silveropities. Ophir also had the distinction of being the location of the first stamp mill in the Territory, when the Walker Brothers located their 15-stamp Pioneer Mill at Ophir in June 1871, processing about 30 tons of ore per day. (Tooele County, pp. 343, 362, 376 Bliss, p. 176)

August 9, 1877
Oquirrh Railway was organized to build, own and operate a railway from near the head of Dry Canyon in Tooele County to a junction with the Utah Western Railway at or near the Basin Ranch in said county, together with a branch running from a convenient point on said railway near the mouth of Dry Canyon to a point in East Canyon near Ophir City, a total length of about 20 miles. (Utah corporation 4302)

1883
The Pioneer quartz-mill of 15 stamps, for the reduction of silver ore, the first one in Utah, was built by Walker Bros, at the Ophir mining district. When that district was considered a failure the mill was removed to the Alice mine in Montana, five stamps being added, and a 60-stamp mill erected by its side. Nevertheless, at the close of 1883 there were three mills in this district, named the Pioneer, Enterprise, and Fairview. At this date (1883) the Ontario mill, at Park City, Uintah district, had 40 stamps, and the Marsac mill at the same city, 30 stamps. Among others may be mentioned the McHenry mill at Parley Park, the Stewart mills in the West Mountain district, and one belonging to the Tintic Mining and Milling Co., the last with 10 stamps. (History of Utah, 1540-1886, by Herbert H. Bancroft, 1889, page 749 See also: Walker's Merchants and Miners of Utah)

Article about Stockton District. Ophir Hill mine was shipping ore to Terminus on the Oregon Short Line, twelve miles away. The mine was owned by W. A. Clark. (Salt Lake Mining Review, Volume 3, number 10, August 30, 1901, p.13)

Article about Ophir and Stockton, with photographs. (Salt Lake Mining Review, Volume 9, number 11, September 15, 1907, p.19)

St. John & Ophir Railroad

March 2, 1912
St. John & Ophir Railroad was organized to construct, equip, own, control, maintain and operate by steam or electric power a line of railroad from a point of connection with the San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake Railroad at St. John Station, then east to the Town of Ophir, a distance of about 10 miles. (Utah corporation 9449)

March 5, 1912
St. John & Ophir Railroad was incorporated in Utah. (Utah corporation 9449 Poor's Manual of Railroad, 1929, page 1701)

August 1912
"Railroad Day at Ophir", article about the completion of the St. John & Ophir Railroad, with photographs. Railroad was 8.6 miles long. Grading began on March 15, 1912 and the railroad was completed on July 24, 1912. Grades varied between two and seven percent. The first four miles used 52-pound rail, with the remainder using 60-pound rail. The railroad used fourteen degree curves. The railroad owned one locomotive and one combination baggage coach. The railroad was owned by W. A. Clark, who also owned the Ophir Hill Consolidated mine. (Salt Lake Mining Review, Volume 14, number 9, August 15, 1912, pp.11-15)

1918
The St. John & Ophir was under federal control from January 1, 1918 to June 26, 1918. (ICC Finance Docket 214 72 ICC 121)

July 7, 1922
The federal ICC approved a deficit settlement for the period that St. John & Ophir was under federal USRA control. (ICC Finance Docket 214, approved July 7, 1922, in 72 ICC 121)

1925
Article about the closing of the Ophir Hill Consolidated mine "at the end of the month." (Salt Lake Mining Review, Volume 27, number 16, November 30, 1925, p.14)

1926
St John & Ophir, Valuation Docket 11. (108 ICC 774)

  • A single track standard-gauge railroad, about 8.5 miles long, wholly within the State of Utah, extending from St. John, Utah (on Los Angeles & Salt Lake Railroad), with Ophir Consolidated Mining Company mine at Ophir, Utah.
  • Station at St. John is owned by LA&SL and used jointly by way of rental fees from St. John & Ophir Railroad.
  • Maximum grade of 7 percent, and curves of 14 degrees.
  • Constructed by Utah Construction Company construction commenced about March 2, 1912, and railroad placed in operation on July 18, 1912.
  • Financed by William A. Clark, who also built and owned the San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake Railroad, later renamed Los Angeles & Salt Lake Railroad.
  • Two steam locomotives, valued at $22,601.88 one passenger car valued at $1,805.00.

September 21, 1928
"Notice. St. John & Ophir Railroad Company hereby gives notice that on the 10th day of September, 1928, it filed with the Interstate Commerce Commission at Washington, D. C., its application for a certificate that the present and future public convenience and necessity permit the abandonment of operation of its railroad which extends from Ophir to St. John, a distance of 8.56 miles, all in Tooele County, Utah. 1st publication, Sept. 21st, 1928. Last Publication, Oct. 5th, 1928." (Tooele Transcript-Bulletin newspaper)

October 26, 1928
ICC approved the abandonment of the St. John & Ophir Railroad, which connected with LA&SL at St. John. (ICC Financial Docket 7108, in 145 ICC 611)

  • Constructed during summer of 1912 for the purpose of transporting lead-silver ores mined in Ophir Canyon.
  • The railroad had been operating at a loss since 1919.
  • Beginning in 1921 and continuing through 1928, the Ophir Consolidated Mining company, from time to time, advanced to the railroad funds to defray the railroad's operating costs, the final total being $63,500, in the form of indebtedness at the time of abandonment.
  • Ores gradually depleted during period of 1923-1928 only the Ophir Consolidated Mining Company was producing ores.
  • The Ophir Consolidated Mining company, the line's principle shipper, ceased operation in December 1925.
  • Operation of railroad ceased in 1926.
  • 581 carloads shipped during 1923, including 541 carloads of ore
  • 38 carloads of freight received during 1923
  • 35 passengers in 1923
  • 279 carloads shipped in 1924, including 234 carloads of ore
  • 44 carloads of freight received in 1924
  • 33 passengers in 1924
  • 478 carloads shipped in 1925, including 443 carloads of ore
  • 36 carloads of freight received in 1925
  • 13 passengers in 1925
  • 52 carloads shipped in 1926, including 30 carloads of ore
  • 22 carloads of freight received in 1926
  • 6 passengers in 1926
  • 41 carloads during 1927, including 28 carloads of ore
  • 13 carloads of freight received
  • 4 passengers in 1927
  • The only residents of St. John, Utah (connection with LA&SL), were the company's section crew and its station agent.

December 10, 1928
Utah Public Utilities Commission approved abandonment of St. John & Ophir Railroad. (Utah PUC Case 1076)

  • In addition to above information submitted in support of the ICC abandonment case, the following was presented.
  • The mines served stopped being productive in 1919 and the operation of the railroad was at a loss.
  • Annual loss since 1922 was approximately $22,000.00 per year, with the total loss since 1918 being $192,241.58.

January 10, 1938
St. John & Ophir Railroad was dissolved as a corporation by Utah's Third District Court.


History

Trout Lake is a natural body of water with use and visitation dating back to the French fur trapping expeditions of the early 19th century. With the introduction of the railroad, a small community of hopeful prospectors developed around Trout Lake, with a post office operating on and off for several decades beginning in 1882.

Starting in 1891, Trout Lake was used as a refueling station for steam-powered railroad trains in need of water along the Rio Grande Southern Railroad. A large wood tank from this era can still be seen today, near the Trout Lake Trestle, which was added to Colorado’s Register of Historic Properties in 1997.

In 1894, the construction of the Trout Lake dam began to expand the water storage capacity for the nearby Ames Hydroelectric Plant. In the fall of 1909, the timber dam at Trout Lake flooded and was replaced with a rock and soil dam the following year. In 1954, the dam’s spillway was reinforced to divert excess water to the nearby Lake Fork.

Trout Lake Narrow Gauge Trestle to the east of Trout Lake. Photo by: Chuckcars


RGSrr.com

OK - confession time. Up until June 07, I had never actually explored the old RGS right-of-way. My only trip to the area (before this) was in 1991, to Durango. I loved the area and the D&S of course, but didn't even know the RGS had existed back then.

Fast-forward to 2007, when I had learned a lot more, and was able to spend 3 days poking around the area. The list below are tidbits I've collected or written myself about how to explore the old route. It should give a good start, should you have the chance to drive this famous old line. You can easily drive the entire route in a few hours, but a better exploration could take 2-5 days.

Note that in many cases, my Remains page will have more detailed information and photos of specific remaining items this page tries to focus just on how to find and explore these areas.

Here's a Google map of the route of the RGS, right here in the world of today. Some years ago, preparing for an RGS exploration trp, I discovered mapping, on Google maps, and started 'drawing' the RGS right-of-way, looking at satellite imagery, and pairing what I found with the old right-of-way maps in various RGS books. Later, Jim Marlette discovered it, and started filling in more details, and adjusting the accuracy of specific locations, and filling in some of the gaps. Then more recently, Don Bergman discovered it and spent last fall and winter making massive updates, especially by adding icons and photo links. It's now a rather amazing resource - check it out!

Dave has a wonderful Overall Map of the area of the is a great resource. And now he's created another map, w/ more photos.

Mark Evans' Narrow Gauge Circle site has some wonderful 4x4 trip accounts from his explorations of the area, as they drove the old roadbeds and passes. There is a section specifically about the RGS that has a lot of details, maps, photos, etc. Make sure you check out this site. And, the RGS home pg has a town-by-town listing of remaining items along the route, with more directions and photos for exploring the route.

Of course, be respective of private property. Obey the signs, and if you want to see something on, or hike across, private property, make sure you find the owner and get permission first.

Comments or corrections? As usual, just email me at and let me know. Thanks, and enjoy!

The old depot still exists, with the freight house shortened - it's a residence now.

Dallas Divide had a two-track siding, stock pens, and a cluster of buildings including tool sheds, a section house, a bunkhouse, and more. The location is right beside highway 62, and it's easy to find. The actual right-of-way here is on private property (a huge million-acre ranch owned by Ralph Lauren, as I understand), but you can stop and see most of the area from the road.

During my trip in June '07, we weren't able to find any traces of Brown, but perhaps we weren't looking in the right places. We did find a number of old trestle footings beside highway 62. Just north of Brown was the Leopard Creek trestle, 22-a, which stood just behind Green Mountain Ranch. We did find the footings of this bridge it's easy to see and is right on highway 62, at side road X-48. The ROW here is 30' to 50' above the highway, and you can hike it for a good distance I guess it's a horse trail now. Have a look at my photos we explored this area pretty thoroughly, although we walked only a little way along the ROW.

The Placerville depot has been moved but is still standing although in bad shape. Once you are in Placerville (heading south) turn left up the main side street, go up one block, turn left and the decaying remains are on the right. Well worth the 5 minute side trip.

The rest of the town is worth exploring as well. We had some great sandwhiches at the general store, still in its original location. The depot grounds are right next to the river we didn't have time to really explore that area, although I suspect there might be some of the area that's not covered by the current highway. We also explored the area of the wye there's nothing left there now, but you might be just able to make out the old roadbed of the wye.

An ore loading tipple, very similar to the one still standing at Sawpit, existed in Omega until a few years ago, when it collasped. Omega is just north of Placerville via the RGS. The land there is private, but some binocs will show you the pile of timbers.

The Primos ore loading tipple at Sawpit is still standing, in fact, it has been partially restored. You can catch a glimpse of it by the old roadbed to the right (if you're heading south) as you get close to the town of Sawpit. The roadbed is accesible, and you can drive right up to the spur and the bin the roadbed here runs along the river, below the highway.

The site of Vanadium's mill, passenger shelter and 19-car spur is on the left (if you're facing south) of the road north (should be south. ) of Placerville.

Easily accessible on a forest service road. The US Forest Service has restored the coal pocket here, and it's well worth seeing. The forest service road south from Vance is through Trout Lake and beyond (although note that the housing community in Trout Lake has their road on the old ROW for a while).

When driving south on the forest service road, from Vance Junction (or Ilium) south toward Ames and Ophir, keep looking on the left, up on the hill before you cross the Telluride branch grade. The twisted tender for RGS #19 is still up on the hill after it ran away in 1907. This is probably one of the few remaining artifacts that's easily visible from a public road. From the tender, the ROW goes straight up the hill, and is far above Vance Jct by the time it's doubled back that far.

The old roadbed from (I believe) Ilium up Keystone Hill towards Telluride, on the old Telluride branch, is now called the 'Galloping Goose trail', and is open to hiking or biking. It's a really nice trail on the opposite side of the valley to the main road.

Herb Kelsey (in 6/01) and Tom Casper (in 7/05) write that the trick to finding Telluride's branch is to locate Vance Jct. where the old 8 pocket tipple still stands. The line to Telluride branched off there and went South to Anderson, then looped around and went back up the east side of the canyon on the 4% of Keystone Hill. You can hike the roadbed from the Anderson trestle (the Forest Service road intersects the trail at this point) to Keystone, and even all the way into Telluride. If you take State 145 north (west?) from the highway jct where the road goes off to Telluride, you can see the top of Keystone hill across the canyon to the south and see Vance Jct in the valley below.

And then Ron Profitt wrote (3/05): "If you are standing at Vance and look East across the valley the grade is visible and hugs the canyon wall going North for about 1/4 mile (?) and then makes the turn East to Telluride, still on the right side of the canyon going into Telluride. This grade is visible from a small pulloff on Hwy 145 as the highway makes the turn East from the Vanadium area towards Telluride. The grade is across the valley to the South but you "have to look for it" or you won't see it. Also back at Ilium, the Keystone hill grade intersects the valley floor forest road, but, you "have to look for it" and also the "the trestle abutments" for the loop around Ilium and back to Vance. If I remember correctly, this location is about a 100 yards south of the "Church Camp" area, which is where you cross the river and can drive up to the RGS grade and drive back to vance or south to the Ames parking area. I was there last May and I've been in that area quite a bit over the last few years but had never "looked for the grade" going into Telluride in the Condo area you mention, but it is there.

John (from the HOn3 Yahoo list) writes further about how to access the line near Vance Jct and the branch to Telluride, based on his trips in 2005 and 2006: "If you take the forest road which leads down from the Telluride highway, follow it until you reach the church camp at the old powerhouse area in the valley (I forgot the name of that area on the RGS) [Ames power plant?]. Across the river over a new concrete bridge is an area you can park your car and walk a short distance on a connector road up to the high line [the mainline from Vance Jct to Ames] roadbed. This part of the [main] line is an "improved" gravel road up to the Sunshine mesa. At the parking area you can see (looking south) the low line [the branch to Illium and then up to Telluride via Keystone Hill] which a little further down crossed in RGS days the river over a curving trestle and then at 4% climbed the other side of the valley in the opposite direction in a roundabout route to Telluride.

"From the parking area looking north is the low line [ie Telluride branch] which merges further north with the mainline at Vance Jct. The [branch] at this point is on private property in both directions so stay off of it.

"If you hike the [mainline] north, maybe a half mile or so, you will reach Vance and a little bit north of it are the coal pockets. You can follow the RGS grade north still further and you will reach the river and the site of Bilk trestle and its remains in the river."

The depot still exists, and is an art school today. The foundation has been replaced, and Fritz Klinke writes that the location was been shifted south somewhat during that rebuilding. Several of the warehouses east of the depot still exist as well, including one used as the Daily Planet, and another that's currently Smuggler's restaurant. There are also good resources on the RGS available in the library and historical society.

Fritz also notes that further east (further into the box canyon) the Idarado mill complex is still standing, and armed with a Sundance book (The RGS Story Vol 2 - Telluride, Pandora and the Mines Above), the place comes alive, and it is a spectacular location, under the Bridal Veil hydro plant, still in operation producing electricty.

Pacific Avenue along the San Miguel river in Telluride is the former right-of-way into town, at least for a ways toward the depot. Beyond the depot, through the old warehouse district, the yard tracks are now all streets. The depot itself was moved and that immediate area has since been developed. From a parking lot at Pearl Street to Society Turn, the right of way is mostly intact, but large sections of it now cover the Telluride main sewer line to the sewer plant. Other right-of-way is covered by the Lawson Hill development, main power transmission lines laid down the middle of the right of way, etc., plus much of the line in public ownership in the national forest is now known as the Galloping Goose Trail and is a very popular biking and hiking trail as it heads towards Ophir. Mark Evans notes he's walked about 5 miles of it, from Vance Jct toward Ophir, noting that it's basically the old roadbed no bridges left in that portion, though. He did note, however, that the views of Ophir's Cathedral Spires were spectacular.

Goose #4 usually resides in Telluride, and is owned by the Telluride Volunteer Fire Department. They maintain it as a civic responsibility. It sits on the grounds of the county courthouse. Fritz writes that the county is looking at that site for possible underground expansion of the courthouse. A space and utilization study of the courthouse is presently (2/04) underway. Phase I of a restoration of the courthouse is about to start.

There are several discussions taking place on what may happen to the Goose, but it is permanently leaving San Miguel county as far as I know. In the fall of 2008, it was moved to the Ridgway Museum for cosmetic restoration, which is expected to take a couple of years. There is a county historical group that has formed, and their first area of concern has been the stabilization of the San Bernardo mill building, South of Ophir, with the hope of acquiring that structure. With that site is a fair chunck of RGS main line, adjacent to the highway. I'd love to see ties, rails, and an operating Goose at that location. Presently, the National Trust for Historic Preservation has contracted Fritz's company to do initial structural stabilization of that structure, and they are about halfway complete on that work.

Pandora's ball mill (a mile or two east of Telluride proper, toward the box canyon) was standing a year or two ago, but will apparently be demolished soon to make way for new condos.

The branch's right-of-way west out of town, down Keystone Hill and toward Vance Junction, is now a hiking trail. You pick it up at some stores about 1/4 mile outside of town(?), along the the road to Ophir.

Somes ways south of Vance is Ames. To the right (if you're facing south) is Vance Junction, and to the left you can continue and drive basically to the Ames trestle location on the old roadbed.

Ames to Ophir: David Dye writes "The map and photo links here detail a hike that I made on the 4th of June 2005. This is part of the Galloping Goose trail located at Ophir CO. The trail follows the grade of the Rio Grande Southern between the Ames water tank site and the butterfly trestle, Bridge 44-A (Dave then jumped uphill and documented the first three of the high-line trestles, coming downgrade toward Ophir, as far as bridge 46-C). The trail starts where forest road 623 leaves the grade and starts winding up the hillside. I found it to be a very enjoyable hike with the lush mountain side and the only encounter I had was two mountain bikers on the return trip. To view photos from my hike simply click on any of the blue text on the map." (copyright David Dye June 19 2005)."

To get to this location, Dave describes his access: "I came up highway 145 from the south. As you come around the curve at the Ophir loop there is a dirt road that turns off to the left (forest road 625). You may have been on it if you went to Ames to hike into the Butterfly trestle. If you take road 625 4 or 5 miles you will eventually run into road 623 that turns off to the west. It is near some buildings and it crosses the river so it shouldn't be too hard to spot.

Once you head across the river and start up the side of Sunshine you will be on the grade. Continue driving along this long tangent until you hit a hairpin curve that will take you up the mountain. The trail starts right at this hairpin curve. If you walk in a little ways there will be a trail marker with something about the Galloping Goose Trail.

Greg Jackson adds a bit more about the Trail: "Unless I'm mistaken, there really aren't any bridges left in that section. For the most part it does follow the old roadbed and just goes around areas where the trestles once stood. Bridge 51-A intact at the back of Trout Lake, but you're not allowed to go out on it. It is a hikeable and maintained trail - a lot of bicycle traffic. Marked by little goose pic-signs. I know there is a manmade bridge replacing where Butterfly was, but I haven't been on the upper loop to tell you how it gets around toward Matterhorn. Once thru to Matterhorn, it picks up on a regular road - Mears Puzzle area and works up to Trout Lake, which then goes right up to Lizard Head pass. My opinion is this scenery is some of the best in the state."

If you are coming from the north you can also get to 625 just past Lime on highway 145. You will drive past Vance Junction and 623 is probably a couple miles down the road."

Fritz Klinke writes about the Ames Power Plant: Go to the Ophir turnoff, take the dirt valley road to Ilium and Vance Junction, and there you'll find the Ames Station powerplant -- well worth a visit. All of that structure's power generating equipment (Pelton waterwheel and generator) came in on the RGS and was lowered down to that site from the railroad above. Pictures of all that are in the L.L. Nunn collection at Cornell University, including construction photos of the stone building housing the still operating equipment. This is the site of the first commercially generated AC electricty in the world. Waste water from Ames was taken by flume down valley to the Ilium plant, where a second generating station was located. That plant was destroyed (and later rebuilt) in the 1909 (?) flood that occurred when one of the dams on the upper two reservoirs above Trout Lake gave way, took out the Trout Lake dam, and caused havoc all down the San Miguel valley, including taking out large portions of the RGS line.

And John (from the HOn3 Yahoo list) writes further about going from Vance Jct south along the main to the Ames tank and the Butterfly trestle below bridge 46-F: "Back at Vance, continue on the [main]/road south and eventually you will come to where the Sunshine Mesa road separates from the [mainline]. Then through a gate you can continue to hike the [main from Ames] to Ophir past the Ames water take remains, Ames trestle site and Windy Point. At Windy Point if you have a good telephoto lens (200mm or better) you can get some some great pictures of the highline bridge sites. I did not have such a telephoto lens unfortunately, and in 2005 a wicked rainstorm popped up at that point.

"Anyway, the trail will lead you down to the river crossing of the Butterfly trestle over a new low bridge for bikers and hikers, although the little bridge is built around the concrete supports for a portion of the old improved Butterfly trestle. You can also look up the side of the hill toward Ophir and see some of the remains of the Butterfly trestle bent locations. The actual timbers are lying on private property next to the trail.

"At Butterfly you can veer off the bike trail and get back on the actual road bed to the site of Butterfly, where the rails left the road bed and started over the trestle to go north to Vance. Along the side of this roadbed is a road which will take you to someone's little mine which I would suppose is near the site of the mill and mine sometimes shown in pictures of the Butterfly area around 1900."

The site of the famous Ophir Loop. Traveling on the highway take the turnoff to old Ophir. You'll immediately see the restored Gilton building, right next to the road. Returning to the highway just as you make the sharp right turn at the center of what was the loop, look for an unmarked road descending to the right. Gives you access to both parts of the Loop roadbed. You can hike/ drive about to the Butterfly mill site/ trestle on the lower part, but the road from the highway is a little rough and steep to get to the roadbed (probably best done with a 4WD vehicle). The lower grade is hikeable, but the high-line really isn't. You can hike from the bridge 46-F to Lizard Head.

See above (under the Ames heading) for Dave Dye's fantastic photos of this area and a detailed description of hiking the area. Note that the land above trestle 46-F is private a dirt road leaves the highway up there that is posted and has a gate. Hiking the grade near the high bridges is challenging. You can get down between two bridges from the highway above, but hiking back up is steep and tiring at that altitude.

John McKenzie writes that you can stand above the high-line at Ophir loop and see the Ophir Needles and Butterfly and Windy Point and a large portion of the upper San Migual River Valley with Vance Junction and Keystone Hill, all in one view. There no photo I've ever seen that can do justice to that kind of and all encompassing view.

John also writes that, if your weather is dry, you can drive the right away from the top of Ophir loop where the track crossed the roadway to Lizard head pass, right along through and around Trout Lake water tank and the trestle on your way to Lizard Head pass, it's beautiful best done in mid to late Sept. for the fall color, but anytime will do.

Bob Hyman writes that the area near the Butterfly Trestle is accessible by hiking/bike trails from Colorado hwy 145 and from the National Forest road to Ames. He usually parks at the site of the old Ophir Loop and scrambles down where Bridge 45-A used to cross the Howard Fork, fords the creek, climbs up the other side, and walks down the old ROW to cross Lake Fork at Butterfly. [Actually, I believe most of this lower line is drivable w/ a 4-wheel vehicle, although it's very narrow and high].

And John (from the HOn3 Yahoo list) writes further about hiking from Butterfly to the site of bridge 45-A: "Continuing now easterly along the trail [from Butterfly, moving south and away from Ames] you will come upon the lower section of the highline which you can walk to the 45-A trestle site. Just to the side of the trail near the 45-A location is the connector trail [which is drivable - you can see on this photo album] up to both the upper portion of the highline and the highway. You can actually get down to the ground level and see into the little canyon where the RGS built a concrete pier and wooden supports for the trestle over this portion of the river.

"The highline at Ophir end is not really accessible very far. You can walk up to the concrete abutment of Bridge 46-A, but that is about as far as I dared to go. From the highway above or from the lower portion of the highline you can see some of the supports for the westerly end of the high trestle bridge 46-D."

A short distance south of (and above) the Butterfly trestle area is Matterhorn, and just south of that Matterhorn mill is on the right (if you're heading south). The owner hates people getting anywhere near the building. There's a little dirt road here, leading off of Hwy 145, that goes up to the mill. The road right alongside the mill is the old RGS spur. The main when thru a rock cut nearby, now clogged with conveyor machinery. Beyond the mill, the ROW wrapped around the mountainside toward Ophir bridge 46-F.

The grade crossed the highway, and on other side in another dirt road leading into a campground. This is the RGS main, and it's drivable right thru the campground, and eventually leads to Lizard Head. We drove from Trout Lake to Lizard Head, but I'm not sure if you can get to Trout Lake from this campground road. A few years ago (since 7/05) the portion between Lizard Head and Trout Lake wasn't open to vehicles, but it is now (as of 6/07).

John McKenzie also has notes about this area: "The old right of way is getting used more and more from all the people making that area their summer home. The right of way from Vance Junction is totally walkable with with the Ames trestle out and a make shift trail around to the other side. As Greg stated there is a walking bridge over the San Miguel river where Butterfly trestle was. You will be able to walk up the lower "high line" but you will have to walk the main highway as the upper sections of the "high line" are not walkable, but from the highway you'll see the same scenery as you would on the high line as the road is just above where the railroad grade was. You will be able to get back on the right away at MP 46.5 just before where Matterhorn section house was and walk up through the section called Mears Maze to Trout Lake. It's all on the original right away and beautiful to see! You will be at about 10 miles from Vance Junction by then with another 5 miles to continue around the east side of Trout Lake, seeing Trout Lake water tank (in very good condition) and the Trout Lake Trestle, at the north end of the lake and finish up a little further at Lizard Head Pass. 15 miles of 4% grade a difficult walk to do in a short amount of time, plan accordingly. Remember the weather up there at 10,000 feet can change without notice.

Fritz Klinke writes: "At the very bottom of Dave's map is Matterhorn and an aerial tramway is shown on the map. That one is still there and terminates in the Matterhorn Mill building that sits right next to the former RGS mainline. The mill building is reasonably intact and most of the machinery is still inside. It is privately owned and is locked. The new San Miguel county historical society is working on obtaining this mill, and last year, the National Trust for Historic Preservation paid for the emergency stabilization of the interior supports to keep the roof from caving in. It is the only mill building I am aware of on the RGS that is pretty much the way it was when the railroad was operating. There is a series of good photos of this mill in operation in one of the Sundance RGS books. My company did part of the work that was paid for by the National Trust."

You can drive the roadbed from Trout Lake to Lizard Head.

Upper and lower Gallagher trestles. As you descend beyond Lizard Head, the roadbed is visible on the hillside to the left (if you're facing south). You used to be able to take a jeep road off to the left, ford the stream and -voila- you were on the lower roadbed. New guardrails now block access, but if you have wading boots or are willing to get your shoes soaked, you can park on the highway, and still access the old grade. It's a fun hike if you have the time.

Dave Dye has more amazing photos, linked from his maps & photos, this time highlighting the area near the Gallagher trestles. He writes "The map provides links to various photos that I took while hiking the grade on June 4, 2005. Prior to starting the hike I stopped along highway 145 at the location marked by 'Hill Shot'. From here I tried to capture some shots down the ravine that would show where the 3 trestles were located. The hike was then started at the location marked by 'Ties and Trees'. I parked the truck alongside the highway and struggled up the steep hill to the grade. I then hiked south towards bridge 57-A. The location marked 'End of Grade' was explored on my return trip back up the grade. [. ] For those exploring this area and on up to Ophir I would highly recommend Volume IV of 'The RGS Story'. One could conceivably try to spot all of the wooden culverts marked on the map along this stretch. I found one still being put to good use while hiking near the bend. It is also interesting to try and line up your own shots with those taken 50+ years earlier." (copyright David Dye 2005)

And another set here of Dave Dye's photos, linked from his maps & photos, this time highlighting the wye at Lizard Head and the area around Trout lake and bridge 51-A. The pass is pretty easy to drive to. Dave says the wye is pretty easy to see at the pass, although south of the pass the route is difficult to find (probably the highway used or obscured it) until to you get near Gallagher.

We drove up here during the explore in June 2007 from Trout Lake, near dusk, and enjoyed both the drive and the pass area when we arrived there. At dusk it was hard to see all the details, but the little cut between a low hill as the RGS entered the area was plain to see. Very little remains here, although we didn't have time to thoroughly explore it.

Greg Jackson writes that around Coke Ovens, there is little to nothing to find. When you come off the hill at Lizard Head Pass, you'll pass thru a "slot" where the RGS looped back to the Gallager trestles. You'll pass by the site of the meadow creek trestle on your left and the highway turns sharply to the right (West). A bit further downhill the road swings back south. Coke ovens is right in this area. Look for a small creek coming downhill into the Dolores river that was most likely the water source for the tank at C.O. There are the remnants of a coke oven just slightly south of Rico. Just outside of town, keep an eye on the hillside across the river to the west.

Jeff Reynolds writes that the site of Coke Ovens is just upgrade from the stream crossing. At least the stream is still there. No buildings or foundations of any kind. You can kind of make out where the siding was on the river side of the tracks on a slightly wider area. The highway is more or less right on the old RGS grade at that point.

George Cook writes that at Burns Canyon, the road was built right on the track and it was hard to prevent collisions between Iron Horse and the other kind. The road is on the track for another 3.13 miles north from here to where it crosses the river to the east side. Through Coke Ovens, the road used to cross the tracks where they were parallel but now the highway covers some of the grade, say about 1 mile.

The Enterprise branch was a steep (5% grades!) branch leading to the Blackhawk and Enterprise mines, above Rico. I've always been fascinated by the branch because of its many switchbacks, and steep twisting path into the mountain forests. In June '07 we were able to explore the branch a bit. The switchbacks seem to all still exist, as a series of dirt roads. It's difficult, once you're there, to determine exactly which of these roads are the old grade, but it's obvious some of them are. After some driving around on the lower switchbacks and roads, we found ourselves on the obvious grade, and followed it up to both the Blackhawk and Enterprise sites (see my photos!). It's a great route to explore, and easily driveable. We didn't find any original mine buildings left, although we did find some scraps that were, perhaps, from the Blackhawk mine.

We did find the intact ore bin of Union Carbonate, though! This sat on the RGS branch to Enterprise, and was used to transfer ore into railroad cars. The road here is the old Rio Grande Southern right-of-way.

Craig Symington writes that there is lots of the Enterprise branch left. He said you can drive up the leg on the northern side of the gulch - it's a road to a reclaimation area. The other side of the gulch is accessable too. A 4x4 would be recommended, but Craig's rental Grand Am did the trick. :) He didn't know much about the area while there, and thus couldn't really say what's left in the way of mining buildings.

George Cook writes that coming up from Stoner on highway 145, the grade is good into and through Rico to Burns Canyon. I believe the grade through this area is all under or occasionally next to the road.

In Rico, the old water tower is still standing, fenced in and with its roof recently restored. The RR tracks in Rico are off to the right (if you're travelling south) down by the river, somewhat below the town proper. The large ramp down to the depot / yard area, visible behind the depot in many old photos, still exists and is a now an access road of some sort.

The Van Winkle mine, a big producer in the 40's is accessible up the hill a bit at the north end of town as is a drive on a part of the old Enterprise branch leading up toward the Rico-Argentine mill.

Michael Allen writes that as you're coming up 145 from Dolores, about halfway to Rico, look for the Bear Creek section house on the left, well below highway level. The original sign is on the building, which appears to be a private dwelling no now.

George Cook writes that there are 4300 ft of right-of-way covered by highway 145 west of Stoner, but from there north the line is in the farm fields all the way to Loading Pen Canyon, where 1.54 miles are covered to Taylor Creek. From there, heading east, Route 145 was improved by using 7.9 miles to School House creek. Another mile is vacant, but next 2.6 miles is covered by pavement to Wildcat creek.

The right-of-way runs under 4 miles of highway 145 in this area, where the highway was widened.

A must-not-miss is the replica of the depot (offset a bit west from its original location, out of the middle of the street) and the restored and operating Galloping Goose #5. There is a small museum in the depot, and the Goose is sitting outside on a few feet of track. The Goose does operate, traveling to the C&TS or the D&S now and then. There is an effort underway to relay track from Dolores to Mancos, so the Goose can operate more often.

The old ROW into town from the south follows Road 30. Just one mile of the ROW is covered, on 145 through the main town area.

Heading south/east out of Dolores on 184, and some distance past Road 30, look for Road S going to your left. This will take you down into the lost Canyon, but you won't be able to drive the ROW. You will need to get back on 184 and look for Road 30, which will take you into Dolores along the ROW.

W. George Cook writes about some of the exploring you can do in and around the old town site of Glencoe, if you have permission to get into that area (it is private):

"From Glencoe, do not fail to walk a short distance north and discover the wonderful rock formation in which the lower switch-back tail was built in between and around. It would make a wonderful model on any layout, but I failed to get any photos there when I measured the length of the tail. As we discovered, the logs cars were not handled down the switch-backs so the tail was not needed to be long, and only service cars and cars of ties were handled on the steep grade.

Also, climb up the grade of the log chute and discover where the logs were unloaded and dropped down the wood chute. You can see the old ties of the run-around and walk north to discover how the tail of this run-around was so close to the mesa edge that a 8-bent trestle had to be built to make the tail long enough to cut #1 (ex-D&RG #56) off and run around on the open siding track. This would make a wonderful model subject also, for those who want to build something that looks crazy.

Your model layout visitor would say "they never did that" and you can show them the actual fact that it was true. See page 130 of RGS Story Volume 8 as it shows the side view of the short trestle centered behind the pine tree, in the original photo.

Tom Casper writes "When you mention Lost Canyon I hope you are referring to the part just east of Dolores I drove to the 2nd Smalley (lumber mill site) twice and hiked to 1st Smalley once in the 80's. The other end of the canyon past Glencoe is a road open for car travel from Millwood. Part of it is on Indian land so is not always open to drive. [the spur is named for R.O. Smalley, who operated a sawmill south of Lost Canyon with a 1-car spur (called Smalley) at MP 109.0 in 1917. As was often the case with these small mills, it was moved north to MP 108.5 (near Lost Canyon), existing there from 1917 to (approx) 1920 with a 6-car spur.] Anyway here goes:

Tom also refers to Road S, which turns into Forest Service Rd. 556 (and eventually becomes Haycamp Mesa Rd) When you turn on this road, it drops down grade to the bottom of the canyon and cuts the old roadbed. Just past the grade and as the road starts back up the hill, there was a field road that could be driven with a high clearance vehicle that goes to the creek and would get you on the grade. I haven't been back there since the late 80's so don't know if it is fenced now or not. The trail to the grade was getting thin in a few spots from creek erosion so maybe by now all you can do is walk.

Past Smalley, the grade crossed the creek and that is as far as one could drive. There are trestle bents and a few stringers left in the canyon when I hiked it plus lots of ties. In a couple of spots, there was stacked stone retaining walls to keep the grade from washing out." [sjh - We hiked this portion, see the photos above].

And finally a warning - when on foot along many stretches of the old roadbed, but particularly through Lost Canyon, be on the lookout for rattlesnakes. Big 'uns! (this from Brian Svikhart).

The McPhee reservoir completely covers the site of the sawmill and town of McPhee, but the grade on the mesa and where it goes north up the mesa can be followed. The RGS Story on Dolores covers this really well.

The McPhee and AA Rust branches are nearby and are hikeable. McPhee itself is underwater now, but apparently you can still hike the ROW of the logging road beyond McPhee.

When we explored it in June '07, we also found the beginning of the branch to McPhee (see my photos) we didn't have time but it seems one could drive at least the beginning of this branch. The town of McPhee is now underwater, but from the maps I've looked at, I think a good portion of the branch may still exist.

Michael Allen (8/06) continues his trip from Cima (see below) on US 160: Once you hit Mancos, turn right on route 184. 160 covers 1.13 miles of the roadbed (in the town proper, I think). The grade will cross just before Bauer Lake. At Bauer Lake, turn right on road 40, and take it until it dead ends at Road P. Turn left and at the second intersection, you will see the grade curving in from the left. Turn right and you will be on the grade, heading for Millwood. Follow the grade as far as you can towards the Lost Canyon, but when you finally reach a gate you will have to back track out to route 184.

Just east of Mancos, north of US 160 and just west of Echo Basin road is a small bridge that has no track or ties, but the rest of the timbers remain. Much of the grade between Mancos and Cima is still quite visible, or drivable as noted above, but be aware that most of the line is on private land once you are in Montezuma county. (Philip Walters, 11/04)

There used to be a few pieces of rail on the ROW just north of Hwy 550 (I think Philip meant 160) as you drove west towards Cortez, on the west side of Mancos. If you keep your eyes peeled, you can spot the ROW as it curves to the north on it's way to Dolores. It's in the middle of a cow pasture, but easily seen from the highway. The rails are not spiked down, they are just laying there, maybe two or three pieces. This was in April, 2003, driving thru on way to Moab. (Philip Walters, 11/04)

The tank and the rotting remains of two cars exist at East Mancos, but they are on private property, and the owners (Yoder Ranch) really dislike people trepassing here. There was an effort some years ago, by the owners, to have the tank area carved out and acquired by BLM (or some other Federal entity). Not sure if anything came of that effort.

If you start hiking on Grady Mesa, you can follow the grade down to the tank. The tank was remarkably well preserved in 1995 - someone had reroofed it with asphalt tar paper. The two car bodies stood to the east of the grade, across from the tank. They were totally overgrown by wild roses. Because it's private, I must recommend ending your hike when you get to the fence (not sure how close that is to the tank). East Mancos is on very private property and I understand that the owners get very upset when they find folks poking around out there.

To get near the tank, go east from Mancos on Hwy 160 to FR316 (a forest access road, also called Madden Peak Rd). Turn north on 316 (left coming from Mancos), drive about 1.25 miles until the grade crosses the road (you'll have to watch for it, but I guess it's not hard to find). Then turn left on the grade (you'll need to walk now) and hike another 1 to 1.5 miles. The tank should be visible, but I understand there is a fence across the road as you approach it. The property beyond is private, so don't cross it.

John Humphrey writes that if, instead of turning left up the roadbed to the East Mancos tank, you turn right, you can travel about 6 miles (

MP132.7-139), on forest road 568. You will pass the remains of the Starvation Creek trestle, (the road bypassed the trestle). Be careful of the time of the year or else the creek will be too deep to cross. He recommends a 4-wheel-drive (4WD) on this part of the grade.

John Stutz writes: "Several of us drove in to the tank last fall (Fall 2008), with permission and an escort. The site is quite interesting, with triple reverse loops, two practically on top of each other near the tank site. Quite a succession of cuts and fills were needed to fit the loops into the topography. The tank was still standing. Not much left at the trestle site, but there are a couple car bodies collapsing into the brush. There is a long borrow pit along the lower part of the middle loop, easily a 50' wide bench in alluvial soil, so I suspect that the RGS ditcher spent a lot of time loading dirt here. Or perhaps they had the D&RGW shovel in?

"Afterwards I went around to the ridge top road and hiked down the RR RoW, through National Forrest land to the private fence line. It would be an easy hike both ways, but I elected to climb out along a pipeline RoW east of the loops, with a very clear view down on the loops. That was a real puffer - straight up the ridge face. Would have been a lot easier going around the other way and down the pipeline."

Tom Casper writes "I was out on the RGS last week (9/00) and found out you can now drive on the grade on the east side of Cima Summit. A developer has made an access road for the La Plata Ranch Estates that will take you to the old grade. Some of the grade is on the road and then the new road peters out and you are on the grade a ways. Nice view to the west. This entrance is east of the Cherry Creek Access road."

Michael Allen (8/06) confirms this - there's a big horseshoe curve on US 160 where it crosses a ridge ( Hwy 160 and FR316). If you turn north, onto county road 316, you can drive back to the grade and if you turn right, you can head toward Cima hill, even with a car. East Mancos is to the left off this road, but private property will prevent you from driving the grade or getting in to the tank.

Michael Allen's route from Ute Junction (see below) continues - after you hit 140, continue on it and rejoin US 160 at Hesperus. Follow it towards Mancos. The ROW will be on your right and there are several dirt roads that let you get back to it. If you have a 4WD, you can drive most of the grade on Cima Hill, between May Day and East Mancos.

Michael Allen's route from Durango (see below) continues on D&RG Drive (thru a subdivision) to about RGS MP 152. From here, the line heads in a straight line towards Ute Junction. You will need to backtrack a bit towards Durango and go left on County road 125. This will take you up to route 140, but you will cross the old grade right about at Ute Junction. This is Indian land, so you probably should not try hiking the 1/4 mile or so in to Ute Junction.

Robert Alford writes (6/06) that "it is possible to still see and photograph the Ute Mine, It took me a month to get approval from the southern Ute indian tribe it's their land. The mine area still has ties and some rail in place, the mines and tipples and a few buildings, I was taken in with one of their guides on horseback so as not to disturb the land. We talked and photo'd all day it was fun.


Railway in Singapore

The Singapore Railway Line was the southernmost segment in the West Coast Line of the Malayan railway system. It was mooted as early as the 1860s, approved by the Legislative Council in 1899 and completed in 1903 at a cost of $2 million. Management of the Singapore Railway operations, buildings and land were transferred to the Federated Malay States Railway (FMSR) in 1918 for over $4 million. The Malayan Railway Administration &ndash predecessor of Keretapi Tanah Melayu (KTM) Berhad &ndash was established in 1948. 1 The terminus in Singapore was the Tanjong Pagar Railway Station.

History
Early developments
In the 1800s in Singapore, the only semblance of a railway line was a five-kilometre track that connected Singapore town from Telok Ayer Street to the harbour in Tanjong Pagar. The decision to build a railway that would in the long run transport passengers and goods to peninsular Malaya was made at the turn of the century, with the birth of the Singapore-Kranji railway line. 2

The railway system in Malaya was built initially to service the tin mining industry. However, it later became a boon to the rubber industry, helping to boost Malaya&rsquos economic growth. The first railway lines opened in 1885 and traversed tin-rich Larut in Perak, transporting goods between Taiping and Port Weld over a distance of 7.5 miles (12 km). 3

Plans to build a railway line through Singapore, primarily to service the New Harbour (later known as Keppel Harbour) had been mooted in as early as 1869 by Engineer W. J. du Port of the Tanjong Pagar Dock Company. The project was approved by Governor Charles Bullen Hugh Mitchell only in 1899 after then Governor Cecil Clementi Smith raised the need for it in an 1889 Legislative Council meeting. 4 Construction works were then initiated, with the groundbreaking ceremony held on 16 April 1900. Chinese labour was employed principally. 5

C. E. Spooner, general manager of the FMSR, was appointed the supervisor of the project. Costing a total of $1,967,495, the Singapore-Kranji Railway Line, running from Tank Road to Kranji, was completed in 1903. Opened in two phases, the first section was launched on 1 January 1903. 6 It stretched from Tank Road to Bukit Timah and consisted of four stations along the line: Singapore, Newton, Cluny and Bukit Timah. According to a newspaper report the following day, &ldquoa total of 557½ passengers were carried&rdquo on the opening day. The second section, which extended the line to Woodlands, was completed three months later when the Woodlands station was opened on 10 April 1903. 7 In 1903, there were a total of 426,044 passengers. By 1905, this had increased to 525,553. 8

Soon after, work began on an extension of the railway line from Tank Road to the wharves in Pasir Panjang. The extension was completed and opened on 21 January 1907. 9 With the extension, railway stations consisted of Woodlands, Bukit Panjang, Bukit Timah, Holland Road, Cluny, Newton, Tank Road, Borneo Wharf and Pasir Panjang. 10

Prewar developments
For 15 years, the railway line operated two ferry-boats &ndash the Singapore and the Johore &ndash which brought rail passengers across the Johor Strait. With the completion of the Causeway in 1923, trains could finally cross the Malay Peninsula into Singapore. 11 The heaviest passenger traffic was on Sundays when Johor&rsquos gambling farm proprietors paid the return fares for the people in Singapore travelling up north to gamble. The fares were 8, 5 and 3 cents a mile for first-, second- and third-class passengers respectively. 12

The Tank Road station served as the only terminus for passenger trains in Singapore until the completion of Tanjong Pagar Railway Station on 3 May 1932. 13 The Tanjong Pagar station was designed by local architectural firm Swan and Maclaren based on studies of various English stations by a partner of the firm in 1927. The three sheltered train platforms were 950 ft (290 m) long, and passenger facilities included accommodation for first-, second- and third-class passengers, refreshment rooms, dining rooms, waiting rooms, mail rooms, a telegraph office, a hairdresser&rsquos shop, dressing rooms, toilets, as well as offices and bedrooms for the station staff. 14

Lodgings known as the Kelantan Flats along Kampong Bahru Road were constructed to house workers of the Malayan Railway and the Malayan Customs. These lodgings were also designed by Swan and Maclaren. 15 The workers, who were mainly Tamils and Malays, and their families could use the free medical facilities. 16 The Tank Road-Bukit Timah Line was dismantled sometime in the early 1930s. 17

Later developments
On 4 March 1966, the 12-mile (19 km) extension line from Bukit Timah to Jurong Port Road, into the new Jurong Industrial Estate, was officially opened. This was a joint venture between Malaysia&rsquos Keretapi Tanah Melayu Berhad and Singapore&rsquos Economic Development Board, and cost S$5.9 million to build. 18 However, the line did not see extensive use and was abandoned in the 1990s. 19

Recent developments
In 2016, the Singapore and Malaysian governments signed an agreement to build a high-speed rail connecting the two countries. Expected to be operational by 2026, the high-speed rail would reduce travel time between Kuala Lumpur and Singapore to 90 minutes. 20

Description
The Singapore railway is typical of British colonial railway systems, built to the metre gauge (3 ft 3⅜ in). Singapore had KTM&rsquos only hydraulic buffer stops developed by Ransomes & Rapier, a British manufacturer of railway equipment. The Singapore station was also one of three major signal cabins along the West Coast Line until 1967, when a new station was opened in Butterworth, Penang. Singapore&rsquos Tanjong Pagar station was also only one of three stations with hotels, the other two being Ipoh and Kuala Lumpur. 21

The railway track in Singapore ran along the current Cuppage Road, across Monk&rsquos Hill Road and towards a station in Newton on Gilstead Road, close to where the Newton Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) Station now stands. The tracks then traversed Bukit Timah Road, with a stop at Cluny Station and Bukit Timah Station before passing through Bukit Timah village to Kranji and Woodlands. 22 An extension for goods trains was opened in 1907. This connected Tank Road Station to the dockyard in Pasir Panjang, via the People&rsquos Park area. 23 Before leaving Singapore, there would be slowdowns at Bukit Timah and Kranji for manual exchange of key tokens. 24 The tokens were exchanged between train drivers or crew at a station or intersection, and signified permission to proceed based on security and traffic conditions. 25

Railway land
Acquired under the Singapore Railway Transfer Ordinance of 1918, the KTM had three plots of land totalling 63.8 ha in Singapore for use solely to operate a railway service. These excluded about 40 km of tracks from Woodlands to the Tanjong Pagar station in Keppel. 26

After Singapore and Malaysia signed the landmark Points of Agreement on 27 November 1990, Malaysia gave up the six railway sites in Tanjong Pagar, Kranji, Woodlands and Bukit Timah in exchange for six land parcels in the Marina South and Ophir-Rochor areas. 27

Variant names
The Singapore Railway Line was also known as the Singapore Deviation, the Singapore-Kranji Railway and the Singapore Government Railway. 28

Timeline
1869:
Engineer W. J. du Port of the Tanjong Pagar Dock Company proposes to build a railway through Singapore at an estimated cost of $200,000. 29
1871: The Tanjong Pagar Dock Company puts forward another proposal to Governor Harry St George Ord, but the public protests against the use of public funds for private interests.
1874: Governor Andrew Clarke announces his support for the construction of a railway &ndash the New Harbour Railway &ndash for private use. 30
1 Jun 1885: The first section of the Malayan railway, a seven-and-a-half-mile track (12 km), opens between Taiping and Port Weld, serving the main mining area in Larut.
Sep 1886: The 21-mile (34-km) track between Kuala Lumpur and Klang opens, with an extension to Port Swettenham three years later.
1889: Governor Cecil Clementi Smith proposes building a railway train system for Singapore. 31
1891: Seremban is linked up with Port Dickson. 32
1898: Cecil Clementi Smith announces that the government would soon be able to construct a railway in Singapore. 33
1899: Funding of $1,000,000 is approved for the railway.
1900: Penang (Prai) is linked up with Seremban.
16 Apr 1900: The groundbreaking ceremony for the Singapore-Kranji Railway Line is held.
1901: The Federated Malay States Railway is established to unite the different railway systems in Malaya, and to construct a railway system in Singapore. 34
1 Jan 1903: The Singapore-Kranji Railway line is completed. The section from Tank Road to Bukit Timah opens. 35
10 Apr 1903: The Woodlands extension is completed. The first passenger trains begin transporting travellers to Bukit Timah Station. 36
1905: Seremban is connected to Tampin. 37
21 Jan 1907: The extension to Pasir Panjang is completed. 38
1909: The Johor Railway is completed, delivering most of the surface mail from central and western Peninsular Malaya to Singapore. (Note: The missing link between Woodlands and Johor Bahru was bridged by a wagon ferry service, with launches for passengers). 39
1 Jul 1918: Singapore is linked to Bangkok through the launch of a train service, with the mail service using this line from 1 November the same year. 40
1918: The properties and estates previously under the Singapore Railway are sold to the Government of the Federated Malay States for $4,136,000, and the railway is renamed the Federated Malay States Railway. 41
17 Sep 1923: The first goods train travels via the Causeway.
1 Oct 1923: The first passenger train travels via the Causeway. 42
28 Jun 1924: Completion of the rail and road causeway that links Singapore to Johor, Negri Sembilan, Selangor, Perak, Province Wellesley, Kedah and Perlis, joining up with the Royal Siamese State Railway at Padang Besar.
1926: The Railroad Board supports a scheme for a new station at Tank Road and various other improvements. 43
1928: The Changi Railway is constructed for Singapore&rsquos defence. It services the new Changi battery, and cuts through Fairy Hill with a loop to the ammunition dump at Selarang. 44
1932: The Tanjong Pagar Railway Station is officially opened by Governor Cecil Clementi. 45
1930s: The Tank Road-Bukit Timah Line is dismantled. 46
1948: Under the Malayan Railway Ordinance, railways previously managed by the Federated Malay States Railway are now managed by the Malayan Railway Administration. 47
1962: The Malayan Railway Administration is renamed Keretapi Tanah Melayu Berhad.
1965: The 14-kilometre-long Jurong Railway is opened to serve the new Jurong Industrial Estate. The track runs from Bukit Timah Railway station through Ulu Pandan and Clementi, It closes in 1990. 48
4 Mar 1966: A 12-mile-long (19 km) branch is added to the Singapore Line, spanning Jurong and Bukit Timah, and built at a cost of $5.9 million. 49
1970s: The government studies the option of an all-bus public transport system and a mass rail system.
1987: MRT system is launched.
June 1991: Former Minister of National Development S. Dhanabalan makes first official statement in Parliament on the railway land agreement. 50
2010: Singapore and Malaysian Prime Ministers announces plan for rapid transit link. 51
2011: The 26-kilometre Singapore Railway Line closes, ending more than a century of railway transport in Singapore. 52 The Tanjong Pagar railroad stretch is decommissioned in a land-swap agreement. 53 The railway line to Malaysia then starts at Woodlands. The former stations at Bukit Timah and Tanjong Pagar are granted conversation status. 54
30 June 2011: The last train leaves Tanjong Pagar, driven by Sultan Ibrahim Iskandar of Johor. 55
1 July 2011: The 26-kilometre stretch of KTM railway land reverts to Singapore. 56
16 Sep 2011: Old Bukit Timah Railway Station reopens to the public. 57
Jan 2012: The last of the former KTM railway tracks is dismantled to send back to Malaysia. 58
2015: Part of the Tanjong Pagar rail terminus makes way for the construction of the new underground Cantonment station on the Circle Line. The Cantonment station is slated to be ready in 2025. 59
2016: Singapore and Malaysia governments sign agreement to build high-speed rail, which would connect Kuala Lumpur and Singapore with a travel time of 90 minutes.

Author
Bonny Tan

References
1. Hussain Zakir. (2011, July 1). All aboard, last trains chug across S&rsquopore. The Straits Times, p. 38. Retrieved from NewspaperSG
2. Chandy, G. (1979, April 30). Tracking railway&rsquos long history. New Nation, p. 12. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
3. Makepeace, W., Brooke, G. E., & Braddell, R. S. J. (Eds.). (1991). One hundred years of Singapore (Vol. 2). Singapore: Oxford University Press, p. 121. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 ONE-[HIS]) Wright, A. (Ed.). (1989). Twentieth century impressions of British Malaya: Its history, people, commerce, industries, and resources. Singapore: G. Brash, p. 177. (Call no.: RSING 959.5 TWE) Stanistreet, J. A. (1974). Keretapi Tanah Melayu: The Malayan railway. Lingfield: Oakwood Press, pp. 5&ndash6, 10, 16&ndash17, 42&ndash43, 55. (Call no.: RCLOS 385.09595 STA)
4. Liu, G. (1999). Singapore: A pictorial history 1819&ndash2000 . Singapore: Archipelago Press, pp. 100&ndash101. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 LIU-[HIS]) The land transport of Singapore: From early times to the present. (1984). Singapore: Educational Publications Bureau, p. 39. (Call no.: RSING 779.9388095957 LAN) Wright, A. (Ed.). (1989). Twentieth century impressions of British Malaya: Its history, people, commerce, industries, and resources. Singapore: G. Brash, p. 183. (Call no.: RSING 959.5 TWE) Bogaars, G. (1969, July). The effect of the opening of the Suez Canal on the trade and development of Singapore. Journal of the Malaysian Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, 42(1 (215)), 208&ndash251. Retrieved from JSTOR via NLB&rsquos eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/
5. Singapore-Kranji Railway. (1903, January 2). The Straits Times, p. 5. Retrieved from NewspaperSG The land transport of Singapore: From early times to the present. (1984). Singapore: Educational Publications Bureau, p. 39. (Call no.: RSING 779.9388095957 LAN) Wright, A. (Ed.). (1989). Twentieth century impressions of British Malaya: Its history, people, commerce, industries, and resources. Singapore: G. Brash, pp. 183&ndash184. (Call no.: RSING 959.5 TWE)
6. &lsquoA fine engineering achievement&rsquo. (1932, May 3). The Straits Times, p. 12. Retrieved from NewspaperSG Liu, G. (1999). Singapore: A pictorial history 1819&ndash2000. Singapore: Archipelago Press, pp. 100&ndash101. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 LIU-[HIS]) The land transport of Singapore: From early times to the present. (1984). Singapore: Educational Publications Bureau, p. 39. (Call no.: RSING 779.9388095957 LAN) Wright, A. (Ed.). (1989). Twentieth century impressions of British Malaya: Its history, people, commerce, industries, and resources. Singapore: G. Brash, pp. 183&ndash184. (Call no.: RSING 959.5 TWE) Stanistreet, J. A. (1974). Keretapi Tanah Melayu: The Malayan railway. Lingfield: Oakwood Press, p. 5. (Call no.: RCLOS 385.09595 STA)
7. Singapore-Johore Railway. (1903, April 11). The Straits Times, p. 5. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
8. Wright, A. (Ed.). (1989). Twentieth century impressions of British Malaya: Its history, people, commerce, industries, and resources. Singapore: G. Brash, p. 184. (Call no.: RSING 959.5 TWE)
9. Railway extension. (1907, January 17). The Straits Times, p. 7. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
10. Extension of the railway. (1907, January 21). The Straits Times, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
11. The land transport of Singapore: From early times to the present. (1984). Singapore: Educational Publications Bureau, p. 48. (Call no.: RSING 779.9388095957 LAN)
12. Wright, A. (Ed.). (1989). Twentieth century impressions of British Malaya: Its history, people, commerce, industries, and resources. Singapore: G. Brash, p. 184. (Call no.: RSING 959.5 TWE)
13. The land transport of Singapore: From early times to the present. (1984). Singapore: Educational Publications Bureau, p. 40. (Call no.: RSING 779.9388095957 LAN)
14. &lsquoA fine engineering achievement&rsquo. (1932, May 3). The Straits Times, p. 12. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
15. &lsquoA fine engineering achievement&rsquo. (1932, May 3). The Straits Times, p. 12 Opening of new F.M.S.R. terminal station. (1932, May 7). Malayan Saturday Post, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
16. Stanistreet, J. A. (1974). Keretapi Tanah Melayu: The Malayan railway. Lingfield: Oakwood Press, p. 48. (Call no.: RCLOS 385.09595 STA)
17. Lai, K. J. (1971, July 30). Putting the record straight. New Nation, p. 7. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
18. New link for local industries. (1966, March 4). The Straits Times, p. 12. Retrieved from NewspaperSG Stanistreet, J. A. (1974). Keretapi Tanah Melayu: The Malayan railway. Lingfield: Oakwood Press, p. 6. (Call no.: RCLOS 385.09595 STA)
19. Abandoned rail line can be used for recreation. (1995, January 27). The Straits Times, p. 36. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
20. Sim, R. (2016, December 13). Historic agreement for Singapore-Kuala Lumpur high-speed rail line signed service targeted to start by Dec 31, 2026. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB&rsquos eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg
21. Wright, A. (Ed.). (1989). Twentieth century impressions of British Malaya: Its history, people, commerce, industries, and resources. Singapore: G. Brash, p. 184. (Call no.: RSING 959.5 TWE) Stanistreet, J. A. (1974). Keretapi Tanah Melayu: The Malayan railway. Lingfield: Oakwood Press, pp. 5&ndash6, 10, 16&ndash17, 42&ndash43, 55. (Call no.: RCLOS 385.09595 STA)
22. The land transport of Singapore: From early times to the present. (1984). Singapore: Educational Publications Bureau, p. 40. (Call no.: RSING 779.9388095957 LAN)
23. Stanistreet, J. A. (1974). Keretapi Tanah Melayu: The Malayan railway. Lingfield: Oakwood Press, p. 27. (Call no.: RCLOS 385.09595 STA)
24. Leong, C. Y. (n.d.). A handy guide to the Rail Corridor. Retrieved 2017, January 7 from Urban Redevelopment Authority website: https://www.ura.gov.sg/railcorridor/guide.pdf
25. Tan, A. (2010, September 26). Calls to preserve train station. The Straits Times, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
26. Fernandex, H. (1995, February 7). Track record. The New Paper, p. 26. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
27. Kor, K. B. (2010, May 25). Points of Agreement: A 20-year saga. The Straits Times, p. 6 Shankari, U. (2011, April 9). Tanjong Pagar, Bt Timah stations to be conserved. The Business Times, p. 2. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
28. &lsquoA fine engineering achievement&rsquo. (1932, May 3). The Straits Times, p. 12 Untitled. (1908, November 16). The Straits Times, p. 6 Federated Malay States Railways. Johore State Railway. (1910, January 1). The Singapore Free Press, p. 10. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
29. Bogaars, G. (1969, July). The effect of the opening of the Suez Canal on the trade and development of Singapore. Journal of the Malaysian Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society, 42(1)(215), 208&ndash251. Retrieved from JSTOR via NLB&rsquos eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/
30. The land transport of Singapore: From early times to the present. (1984). Singapore: Educational Publications Bureau, p. 38. (Call no.: RSING 779.9388095957 LAN) Wright, A. (Ed.). (1989). Twentieth century impressions of British Malaya: Its history, people, commerce, industries, and resources. Singapore: G. Brash, p. 183. (Call no.: RSING 959.5 TWE) New Harbour Railway. (1874, June 27). The Straits Times, p. 2. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
31. Teo, E. (2012, October 23). From KTM to MRT. The Straits Times, pp. 10&ndash11. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
32. Makepeace, W., Brooke, G. E., & Braddell, R. S. J. (Eds.). (1991). One hundred years of Singapore (Vol. 2). Singapore: Oxford University Press, p. 121. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 ONE-[HIS])
33. The land transport of Singapore: From early times to the present. (1984). Singapore: Educational Publications Bureau, p. 39. (Call no.: RSING 779.9388095957 LAN)
34. Teo, E, (2012, October 23). From KTM to MRT. The Straits Times, pp. 10&ndash11. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
35. Singapore-Kranji Railway. (1903, January 2). The Straits Times, p. 5. Retrieved from NewspaperSG Liu, G. (1999). Singapore: A pictorial history 1819&ndash2000. Singapore: Archipelago Press, pp. 100&ndash101. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 LIU-[HIS]) Makepeace, W., Brooke, G. E., & Braddell, R. S. J. (Eds.). (1991). One hundred years of Singapore (Vol. 2). Singapore: Oxford University Press, p. 121. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 ONE-[HIS]) Wright, A. (Ed.). (1989). Twentieth century impressions of British Malaya: Its history, people, commerce, industries, and resources. Singapore: G. Brash, p. 177. (Call no.: RSING 959.5 TWE)
36. Singapore-Johore Railway. (1903, April 11). The Straits Times, p. 5. Retrieved from NewspaperSG Wright, A. (Ed.). (1989). Twentieth century impressions of British Malaya: Its history, people, commerce, industries, and resources. Singapore: G. Brash, p. 184. (Call no.: RSING 959.5 TWE)
37. Makepeace, W., Brooke, G. E., & Braddell, R. S. J. (Eds.). (1991). One hundred years of Singapore (Vol. 2). Singapore: Oxford University Press, p. 121. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 ONE-[HIS]) Wright, A. (Ed.). (1989). Twentieth century impressions of British Malaya: Its history, people, commerce, industries, and resources. Singapore: G. Brash, p. 177. (Call no.: RSING 959.5 TWE)
38. Railway extension. (1907, January 17). The Straits Times, p. 7 Extension of the railway. (1907, January 21). The Straits Times, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
39. The land transport of Singapore: From early times to the present. (1984). Singapore: Educational Publications Bureau, p. 39. (Call no.: RSING 779.9388095957 LAN) Makepeace, W., Brooke, G. E., & Braddell, R. S. J. (Eds.). (1991). One hundred years of Singapore (Vol. 2). Singapore: Oxford University Press, p. 121. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 ONE-[HIS]) The Causeway. (1924, July 5). Malayan Saturday Post, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
40. Makepeace, W., Brooke, G. E., & Braddell, R. S. J. (Eds.). (1991). One hundred years of Singapore (Vol. 2). Singapore: Oxford University Press, p. 121. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 ONE-[HIS])
41. Liu, G. (1999). Singapore: A pictorial history 1819&ndash2000. Singapore: Archipelago Press, pp. 100&ndash101. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 LIU-[HIS]) The land transport of Singapore: From early times to the present. (1984). Singapore: Educational Publications Bureau, pp. 38, 41. (Call no.: RSING 779.9388095957 LAN)
42. Stanistreet, J. A. (1974). Keretapi Tanah Melayu: The Malayan Railway. Lingfield: Oakwood Press, p. 5. (Call no.: RCLOS 385.09595 STA)
43. &lsquoA fine engineering achievement &rsquo . (1932, May 3). The Straits Times, p. 12. Retrieved from NewspaperSG Stanistreet, J. A. (1974). Keretapi Tanah Melayu: The Malayan railway. Lingfield: Oakwood Press, p. 5. (Call no.: RCLOS 385.09595 STA)
44. Probert, H. A. (1970). History of Changi. Singapore: Prison Industries, p. 16. (Call no.: RCLOS 959.51 PRO)
45. Stanistreet, J. A. (1974). Keretapi Tanah Melayu: The Malayan railway. Lingfield: Oakwood Press, p. 5. (Call no.: RCLOS 385.09595 STA) &lsquoA fine engineering achievement &rsquo . (1932, May 3). The Straits Times, p. 12. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
46. Putting the record straight. (1971, July 30). New Nation, p. 7. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
47. Cuepacs refutes report of KTM being corporatised. (1989, May 5). The Business Times, p. 20. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
48. Teo, E. (2012, October 23). From KTM to MRT. The Straits Times, pp. 10&ndash11. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
49. New link for local industries. (1966, March 4). The Straits Times, p. 12. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
50. Fernandez, H. (1995, February 7). Track record. The New Paper, p. 26. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
51. Tg Pagar train station to move to Woodlands (2010, May 25). The Straits Times, p. 1. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
52. Teo, E. (2012, October 23). From KTM to MRT. The Straits Times, pp. 10&ndash11. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
53. Tan, C. (2012, August 28). On the trail of a mythic monkey. The Straits Times, p. 5. Retrieved from NewspaperSG
54. Teo, E. (2012, October 23). From KTM to MRT. The Straits Times, pp. 10&ndash11. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
55. Ng, J. X. (2013, April 9). Bilateral rail link. The Straits Times, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
56. Chua, G. (2011, July 23). Parts of KTM railway to be retained. The Straits Times, p. 14. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
57. Ng, E. (2011, September 3). Old Bukit Timah Railway Station to be opened to public. Today, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
58. Chua, G. (2012, January 1). Final pieces of KTM track removed. The Straits Times, p. 18. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
59. Zaccheus, M. (2015, October 30). Part of Tanjong Pagar terminus to make way for MRT station. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB&rsquos eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/

Federated Malay States Railways. (1935). Fifty years of railways in Malaya, 1885&ndash1935 [Microfilm no.: NL 25928]. Kuala Lumpur: F.M.S., Kyle, Palmer & Co.

Haji Shamsuddin. (1985). Malayan Railway, 1885&ndash1985, locomotive centennial. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: Hidayah.
(Call no.: RSING 625.2609595 SHA)

The information in this article is valid as at 2018 and correct as far as we are able to ascertain from our sources. It is not intended to be an exhaustive or complete history of the subject. Please contact the Library for further reading materials on the topic.


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