USS McKee (DD-87)

USS McKee (DD-87)


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USS McKee (DD-87)

USS McKee (DD-87) was a Wickes class destroyer that carried out one mission to the Azores during the First World War, and had a limited post-war career before being decommissioned in 1922.

The McKee was named after Hugh W. McKee, a US naval officer who was fatally wounded during the first US intervention in Korea in 1871.

The McKee was built by the Union Iron Works of San Francisco. She was launched on 23 March 1918 and commissioned on 7 September 1918, with Lt Commander W.H. Lee in command. Her entry into the First World War was then delayed by the need to move from the Pacific to the Atlantic - she left Mare Island, California on 13 September 1918, passed through the Panama Canal on 27 September and reached Destroyer Flotilla 5 at New York on 2 October.

For most of October the McKee was used to escort coastal convoys, but on 28 October she left Hampton Roads as part of the escort for a convoy heading for Europe. She reached the Azores on 5 November, and instead of continuing on to Europe was allocated to a convoy returning to New York. During the return voyage she visited Agar's Island, Bermuda, where the US Navy had a temporary supply station. On 26 November, in poor weather, she twice rammed the fuel barge Fuel-Oil Barge No.36 (previous the Curacao), causing damage below the waterline to one of her oil tanks. The McKee was undamaged, and reached New York on 2 December 1918.

Anyone who served on her between 26 September and 11 November 1918 qualified for the First World War Victory Medal.

The McKee took part in the fleet exercises of January-April 1919, based at Guantanamo Bay. She then operated between Key West and Halifax, Nova Scotia, before on 13 December 1919 she went into reduced commission at Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

In July 1921 she moved to Newport, Rhode Island, and then later in the year to Charleston. In April 1922 she moved to Philadelphia, and on 16 June 1922 she was decommissioned under the terms of the Washington Naval Treaty. She was struck off on 7 January 1936 and sold for scrap to the Boston Iron & Metal Co of Baltimore.

Displacement (standard)

1,060t

Displacement (loaded)

Top Speed

35kts design
34.81kts at 27,350shp at 1,236t on trial (Kimberly)

Engine

2 shaft Parsons turbines
4 boilers
27,000shp design

Range

2,500nm at 20kts (design)

Length

314ft 4.5in

Width

30ft 11.5in

Armaments

Four 4in/ 50 guns
Twelve 21in torpedo tubes in four triple mountings
Two 1-pounder AA guns
Two depth charge tracks

Crew complement

100

Launched

23 March 1918

Commissioned

7 September 1918

Struck off

7 January 1936


McKee History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

As a native Irish name, McKee is derived from the Gaelic "Mag Aodha," or "son of Hugh," while others of the name in Ireland, are ultimately of Scottish origin.

There are different understandings of the Gaelic origin as another source notes the name is "from the Irish O’Maolgaoithe a personal name Chief of Muintir Maolgaoithe (gaoth, wind pronounced ‘ghee’.) " [1]

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Early Origins of the McKee family

The surname McKee was first found in along the border of counties Donegal and Tyrone (Irish:Tír Eoghain), the ancient territory of the O'Neills, now in the Province of Ulster, central Northern Ireland, where they are thought to be descended from the Colla Uais.

The McKee surname has also been long associated with County Antrim, because of the peninsula at Lough Larne, known as the Island Magee which was part of their early Ulster territories. Before the Norman invasion in the 12th century, a Magee was chief of a Sept in county Westmeath. Today, the name is most common in Ulster however, most of these bearers are of Scottish descent.

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Early History of the McKee family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our McKee research. Another 158 words (11 lines of text) covering the years 1766, 1831, 1821, 1891, 1717, 1825, 1868, 1830, 1880, 1755 and 1846 are included under the topic Early McKee History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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McKee Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Magee, Macgee, Mcgee, McGahee, McGhee and others.

Early Notables of the McKee family (pre 1700)

Another 32 words (2 lines of text) are included under the topic Early McKee Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

McKee migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

McKee Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
McKee Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Nancy McKee, aged 16, who arrived in Baltimore, Maryland in 1803 [2]
  • Pat McKee, aged 14, who arrived in Baltimore, Maryland in 1803 [2]
  • Agnes McKee, who landed in America in 1804 [2]
  • Andrew McKee, who landed in South Carolina in 1807 [2]
  • Gabriel McKee, who landed in America in 1811 [2]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

McKee migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

McKee Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • Mr. John McKee U.E. who settled in Osnabruck [South Stormont], Stormont County, Ontario c. 1784 [3]
  • Mr. John McKee U.E. who settled in Saint John, New Brunswick c. 1784 [3]
McKee Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • Jane McKee, aged 30, who landed in Quebec in 1833
  • Elenor McKee, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship "Zephyr" in 1833
  • Anne McKee, aged 23, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1834
  • Mary McKee, aged 30, who landed in Quebec in 1834
  • Rachael McKee, aged 4, who landed in Quebec in 1834
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

McKee migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

McKee Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Hugh McKee, aged 34, who arrived in South Australia in 1854 aboard the ship "Marion" [4]
  • Jane McKee, aged 21, a domestic servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Grand Trianon"
  • Margaret McKee, aged 18, a domestic servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Grand Trianon"
  • Mary A. McKee, aged 22, a domestic servant, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Grand Trianon"
  • Samuel McKee, aged 25, a labourer, who arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship "Glentanner"
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

McKee migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:


USS McKee (DD-87) - History

International Radio Call Sign:
November - Golf - Uniform - Alpha

The ship was commissioned on 16 August 1981. After a series of sea trials, McKee joined Dixon (AS-37) in San Diego to support Pacific Fleet submarines. The McKee was the Command Ship for COMSUBRON11.

Early in 1984, McKee became the first submarine tender certified to support the new Tomahawk cruise missile system. McKee earned three consecutive Battle Efficiency "E" awards in 1985, 1986 and 1987. In addition to the Battle "E" in 1986, McKee was honored with the Golden Anchor Award for retention excellence and her firstMeritorious Unit Commendation.

In 1987, the McKee was the first submarine tender to visit Adak, Alaska since World War II, and conducted the first nuclear submarine upkeep at this remote location. 1988 saw McKee become the first submarine tender certified to handle the Tomahawk Vertical Launch System (VLS).

In February 1989 the McKee performed the first at-sea weapons transfer to a submarine since WWII, to the USS Ohio (SSBN-726).

In March 1990, the McKee continued leading the way for submarine tenders by participating in the first underway fuel replenishment by a Pacific Fleet submarine tender. This fuel was in preparation for deployment to the Persian Gulf in January 1991.

When Operation Desert Storm began, the McKee deployed to the Persian Gulf and spent six months providing support to submarines and surface combatants in Jebel Ali, just outsideDubai, United Arab Emirates. McKee was awarded a second Meritorious Unit Commendation and the Southwest Asia Service Medal. Following Desert Storm, McKee was awarded a fourth Battle Efficiency "E" Award.

In 1995, after the decommissioning of USS Dixon, McKee provided all support to San Diego based submarines. Assistance was also provided to many Allied submarines while they visited Point Loma.

In 1998, McKee earned a third Meritorious Unit Commendation following a six month deployment to Pearl Harbor. During this deployment, McKee provided services and conducted repairs to both U.S. and Allied submarines and surface combatants. Upon returning to San Diego, the ship took the lead in establishing shore-based services that will support the submarines after McKee's departure.

In November 1998 the weapons department of the USS McKee loaded Tomahawk cruise missles onto the HMS Splendid. These were the first of 67 Tomahawk cruise missles sold to the Royal Navy and the first British submarine to receive the Tomahawk missiles. They were later used by the HMS Splendid in offensive operations in Yugoslavia.

On 16 July 1999, McKee was decommissioned from service. Since that time she has been in the Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility (NISMF), located in Portsmouth, Virginia.

USS McKee was one of first ships to integrate female sailors and as a consequence, while unofficially was also known as the "Love Boat" by many of her crew, and the crew members of submarines, assigned to Submarine Squadron 11 for the many relationships that sprung up during the 1990s


USS McKee (DD-87) - History

International Radio Call Sign:
November - Golf - Uniform - Alpha

The ship was commissioned on 16 August 1981. After a series of sea trials, McKee joined Dixon (AS-37) in San Diego to support Pacific Fleet submarines. The McKee was the Command Ship for COMSUBRON11.

Early in 1984, McKee became the first submarine tender certified to support the new Tomahawk cruise missile system. McKee earned three consecutive Battle Efficiency "E" awards in 1985, 1986 and 1987. In addition to the Battle "E" in 1986, McKee was honored with the Golden Anchor Award for retention excellence and her firstMeritorious Unit Commendation.

In 1987, the McKee was the first submarine tender to visit Adak, Alaska since World War II, and conducted the first nuclear submarine upkeep at this remote location. 1988 saw McKee become the first submarine tender certified to handle the Tomahawk Vertical Launch System (VLS).

In February 1989 the McKee performed the first at-sea weapons transfer to a submarine since WWII, to the USS Ohio (SSBN-726).

In March 1990, the McKee continued leading the way for submarine tenders by participating in the first underway fuel replenishment by a Pacific Fleet submarine tender. This fuel was in preparation for deployment to the Persian Gulf in January 1991.

When Operation Desert Storm began, the McKee deployed to the Persian Gulf and spent six months providing support to submarines and surface combatants in Jebel Ali, just outsideDubai, United Arab Emirates. McKee was awarded a second Meritorious Unit Commendation and the Southwest Asia Service Medal. Following Desert Storm, McKee was awarded a fourth Battle Efficiency "E" Award.

In 1995, after the decommissioning of USS Dixon, McKee provided all support to San Diego based submarines. Assistance was also provided to many Allied submarines while they visited Point Loma.

In 1998, McKee earned a third Meritorious Unit Commendation following a six month deployment to Pearl Harbor. During this deployment, McKee provided services and conducted repairs to both U.S. and Allied submarines and surface combatants. Upon returning to San Diego, the ship took the lead in establishing shore-based services that will support the submarines after McKee's departure.

In November 1998 the weapons department of the USS McKee loaded Tomahawk cruise missles onto the HMS Splendid. These were the first of 67 Tomahawk cruise missles sold to the Royal Navy and the first British submarine to receive the Tomahawk missiles. They were later used by the HMS Splendid in offensive operations in Yugoslavia.

On 16 July 1999, McKee was decommissioned from service. Since that time she has been in the Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility (NISMF), located in Portsmouth, Virginia.

USS McKee was one of first ships to integrate female sailors and as a consequence, while unofficially was also known as the "Love Boat" by many of her crew, and the crew members of submarines, assigned to Submarine Squadron 11 for the many relationships that sprung up during the 1990s


Obituary

Hugh Wilson McKee was born, April 23, 1844, at Lexington, Kentucky, the son of Colonel William R. McKee, who fell at Buena Vista while leading his regiment (the Second Kentucky) in the memorable charge under Colonel May.

McKee exhibited, early in his professional life, traits of personal bearing and of character which made him a favorite among men and indicated success and distinction in his career. He was above medium height, straight and compact in figure, of noble and pleasing countenance. His duties were discharged with superior intelligence and sound judgment, with promptitude and exactness, with self-possession and decision. He had in a high degree the quality of command which inspires men with confidence in their leader. But he was even more happy in the relation of friend and comrade. No man in the Navy attracted a larger share of the affection of those with whom he served. His character as an officer commanded the respect of all, and his genial and generous spirit left none untouched who came within the charm of his presence. His death brought to his comrades life-long grief and regret, and by it the Navy and the country lost the bright promise of a useful life.

In the assault upon the principal Corean fort McKee showed an intrepid spirit. The assaulting force, of which he commanded a company, was formed about 150 yards distant from the fort, under shelter of the Monocacy ’s fire. The citadel about to be assaulted, the key to the defenses upon the point below, was built upon the apex of a conical hill, about 150 feet from the bottom of the ravine through which our men had to pass in order to reach it. While waiting, McKee kept, with sword drawn, in advance of his company line. An officer remonstrated with him and begged him to go in with his company and not ahead of it. McKee replied, “I will be the first man in that fort!” The order to charge was given, and our men rushed down the slope and up the opposite hill. McKee leaped into the fort and received in his body the first fire of the enemy. The officer who had so kindly urged him to take the chances with his men followed him closely and found McKee, already pierced by the charge of a jingal, struggling forward and fighting desperately, sword in hand. The blood of the son, like that of the sire, was poured for his country upon a foreign soil.

His brother officers of the Asiatic Squadron placed in the chapel of the Naval Academy a tablet which records his heroic death. The mortal remains of McKee rest in his native State. P. F. HARRINGTON


USS McKee (DD-87) - History

International Radio Call Sign:
November - Golf - Uniform - Alpha

The ship was commissioned on 16 August 1981. After a series of sea trials, McKee joined Dixon (AS-37) in San Diego to support Pacific Fleet submarines. The McKee was the Command Ship for COMSUBRON11.

Early in 1984, McKee became the first submarine tender certified to support the new Tomahawk cruise missile system. McKee earned three consecutive Battle Efficiency "E" awards in 1985, 1986 and 1987. In addition to the Battle "E" in 1986, McKee was honored with the Golden Anchor Award for retention excellence and her firstMeritorious Unit Commendation.

In 1987, the McKee was the first submarine tender to visit Adak, Alaska since World War II, and conducted the first nuclear submarine upkeep at this remote location. 1988 saw McKee become the first submarine tender certified to handle the Tomahawk Vertical Launch System (VLS).

In February 1989 the McKee performed the first at-sea weapons transfer to a submarine since WWII, to the USS Ohio (SSBN-726).

In March 1990, the McKee continued leading the way for submarine tenders by participating in the first underway fuel replenishment by a Pacific Fleet submarine tender. This fuel was in preparation for deployment to the Persian Gulf in January 1991.

When Operation Desert Storm began, the McKee deployed to the Persian Gulf and spent six months providing support to submarines and surface combatants in Jebel Ali, just outsideDubai, United Arab Emirates. McKee was awarded a second Meritorious Unit Commendation and the Southwest Asia Service Medal. Following Desert Storm, McKee was awarded a fourth Battle Efficiency "E" Award.

In 1995, after the decommissioning of USS Dixon, McKee provided all support to San Diego based submarines. Assistance was also provided to many Allied submarines while they visited Point Loma.

In 1998, McKee earned a third Meritorious Unit Commendation following a six month deployment to Pearl Harbor. During this deployment, McKee provided services and conducted repairs to both U.S. and Allied submarines and surface combatants. Upon returning to San Diego, the ship took the lead in establishing shore-based services that will support the submarines after McKee's departure.

In November 1998 the weapons department of the USS McKee loaded Tomahawk cruise missles onto the HMS Splendid. These were the first of 67 Tomahawk cruise missles sold to the Royal Navy and the first British submarine to receive the Tomahawk missiles. They were later used by the HMS Splendid in offensive operations in Yugoslavia.

On 16 July 1999, McKee was decommissioned from service. Since that time she has been in the Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility (NISMF), located in Portsmouth, Virginia.

USS McKee was one of first ships to integrate female sailors and as a consequence, while unofficially was also known as the "Love Boat" by many of her crew, and the crew members of submarines, assigned to Submarine Squadron 11 for the many relationships that sprung up during the 1990s


USS McKee (DD-87) - History

The Naval Cover Museum is up and running. You may access its main page here.

What is a Naval Cover?

A Naval Cover is any envelope, postcard, or other postal medium that is mailed from or somehow related to a navy ship, location, or event. Beginning in 1908, post offices were established on board U.S. Navy ships and each ship had one or more postmarks to "cancel" the stamps used on the cover. The postmark, or cancellation, would usually have the ship's name and the date that the cover was cancelled.

Starting in the 1930's, covers with printed designs, called cachets, began appearing and established a large following. Many different cachets were designed and sent to various ships to be cancelled and mailed. Some cachets were designed for a specific ship while others were generic (perhaps for a holiday or commemorating an historical event) and sent to many different ships. World War II severely curtailed the creation and distribution of cachets and while covers with cachets are still created today, the phenomenon has never regained its pre-war level of enthusiasm.

Naval Covers present us with a snapshot of history a window into a passing age. You hold history in your hand and wonder about the lives, the men and women, the events that were part of that era. Their image is preserved here. Come and visit them.

The Naval Cover Museum

The mission of the Naval Cover Museum is to be a digital archive of naval covers to aid in the preservation and research of this unique historical record and art form. To that end, the Museum is primarily an image repository glued together with lists and indexes. The Museum does not collect physical assets - just images and information.

Over the years the Museum took an inclusive approach and now allows a greater wealth of content as long as it is reasonably related to naval covers or associated ships/locations. This includes photos and documents from sailors and personnel. You never know when something that seems insignificant now will turn out to be significant later. Save for posterity.

The Museum has no physical location and does not have any physical inventory. All we have are scanned images provided by contributors.

The Naval Cover Museum is owned and operated by the Universal Ship Cancellation Society.


Oral History – Admiral Kinnaird McKee, USN

Admiral McKee was born in Louisville, Kentucky in 1929. He graduated from the Naval Academy in 1951. His first duty station was in USS Marshall (DD 676) serving as a unit of Task Forces 77 and 95 during the Korean War. He completed submarine training in 1953 and went on to serve in three diesel submarines: USS Picuda (SS 382), USS Sea Cat (SS 399), and USS Marlin (SST 2), then commanded a small experimental submarine (USS X-1) in 1957. After completing Nuclear Power Training in 1958, he served as engineer, USS Skipjack (SSN 585) and as executive officer, USS Nautilus (SSN 571) and USS Sam Houston (SSBN 608).

Admiral McKee’s first shore tour came in 1964 with his assignment as a member of the staff of the Director, Naval Reactors Branch of the Atomic Energy Commission. From 1966 through 1969, he commanded USS Dace (SSN 607) – the most highly decorated ship in the Atlantic Submarine Force during that period. Staff tours in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations followed. During that period, he established the CNO Executive Panel and became its first Executive Director.

Selected for Flag rank in 1972, he served as Commander, Submarines, Mediterranean (NATO) and Submarine Forces Sixth Fleet during the 1973 Yom Kippur War and the Cyprus Conflict that followed. In 1975, he became the 48 th Superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy. Awarded his third star in 1978, he relieved as Commander, U.S. Third Fleet. Following that sea tour, he returned to the CNO Staff where he established the Naval Warfare Directorate in 1979 and became its first Director. Awarded a fourth star in 1982, he became the Director, Navy Nuclear Propulsion upon the occasion of Admiral H.G. Rickover’s retirement.

Admiral McKee’s personal decorations include two awards of the Navy Distinguished Service Medal and five awards of the Legion of Merit.


In the predawn hours of May 13, 1862, while the white officers and crew slept in Charleston, Smalls and a crew of eight men, along with five women, and three children (including Smalls&aposs wife and two children), quietly slipped the Planter out of Charleston Harbor. Over the next few hours, Smalls successfully navigated the ship through five checkpoints, offering the correct signal to pass each, and then headed out to open waters and the Union blockade. It was daring and dangerous, and if caught, the crew was prepared to blow up the vessel.

The startled crew of the USS Onward, the first ship in the blockade to spot the Planter, almost fired on it before Smalls had the Confederate flag struck and raised a white bed sheet, signaling surrender. The ship’s treasure of guns, ammunition, and important documents proved to be a wealth of information, telling the Union commanders of shipping routes, mine locations and the times that Confederate ships docked and departed.


Historical Note Return to Top

Founded in 1889, the Puget Sound Bridge and Dredging Company was destined to become one of Seattle's most important companies. Whether under the title Puget Sound Bridge and Dredging Company or Lockheed Shipbuilding and Construction Company, their hand can be seen in most major construction sites in the Pacific Northwest including Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, Idaho, Oregon and California. In addition, they are responsible for many ships, including some of the Washington State ferries and many naval vessels during and after World War II.

Some of the highlights in the history of this company include: 1909-1910 Hydraulic Dredges construct Harbor Island, the largest man-made island for thirty-five years--second now only to Treasure Island in San Francisco. Harbor Island was the site of the company since the thirties. 1924 The Dexter Horton Building was constructed in Seattle. At fourteen stories, it was the largest reinforced concrete building in the United States west of Chicago. 1927 A steel cantilever bridge was constructed over the Snake River at Twin Falls, Idaho. 1939 Construction began on the Lake Washington Floating Bridge. WWII WWII provided a boom in contracts for the company with the Navy. In conjunction with their Canadian affiliate, the British Columbia Bridge and Dredging Company, they constructed Naval bases in Alaska at Sitka, Dutch Harbor and Kodiak. In addition the BCB & D built a Point of Embarkation at Prince Rupert for the Army.
Eighty-two ships were constructed for the Navy as well, with a record fifteen (five of three different types) ships being delivered in one day. 1959 Company purchased by Lockheed.

More recent projects include the Grand Coulee Dam, much of the Interstate 5 bridges and roadways through Seattle, and the San Fernando Tunnel in California. They have continued to build ships ranging from dredges, tugs and ferries to mine sweepers, ice breakers and guided missile frigates, mostly for the Navy, Coast Guard and the states of Washington and Alaska.

Content Description Return to Top

This collection contains photographs and publications of the Puget Sound Bridge and Dredging Company and its successor, the Lockheed Shipbuilding and Construction Company, and documents shipbuilding and construction projects in the Pacific Northwest, including Alaska. Building projects represented in the collection include bridges, tunnels, freeways and dams. Many photographs record individual ships in various stages of construction, and there are quite a few photos of shipyard workers during World War II. The collection also contains publications, including the World War II-era employee newsletter, Flood-Tide.

Use of the Collection Return to Top

Alternative Forms Available

View selections from the collection in digital format by clicking on the camera icons in the inventory below.

Restrictions on Use

The Museum of History & Industry is the owner of the materials in the Sophie Frye Bass Library and makes available reproductions for research, publication, and other uses. Written permission must be obtained from MOHAI before any reproduction use. The museum does not necessarily hold copyright to all of the materials in the collections. In some cases, permission for use may require seeking additional authorization from the copyright owners.

Preferred Citation

Lockheed Shipbuilding & Construction Company Photographs and Publications, Museum of History & Industry, Seattle

Administrative Information Return to Top

Arrangement

Materials are arranged in three series: photographs, publications, and oversize materials. Photographs are divided into subseries by subject (bridges, dams, people, products, etc.), with additional subseries of photo albums and miscellaneous negatives and proofs.

  • Series 1: Photographs
    • Subseries A: Bridges
    • Subseries B: Building construction projects
    • Subseries C: Dams
    • Subseries D: Facilities
    • Subseries E: People
    • Subseries F: Products
    • Subseries G: Ships
    • Subseries H: Tunnels
    • Subseries I: Photo Albums
    • Subseries J: Miscellaneous negatives and proofs

    Location of Collection

    Location of Collection

    Acquisition Information

    The collection was donated by Lockheed in 1988.

    Processing Note

    Processed by Helice Koffler. The table of contents for one of the photo albums was removed and relocated into the Oversize materials series in box 11.

    Related Materials

    Detailed Description of the Collection Return to Top

    Series 1: Photographs Return to Top

    Photographs created or received by the Puget Sound Bridge and Dredging Company and its successor, the Lockheed Shipbuilding and Construction Company. The majority of the photographs document various shipbuilding or construction projects. Another large set of photographs shows company employees during the World War II period. The subseries themselves are described more fully below. The photographs have been arranged in nine distinct subseries by subject. The photographs were received from Lockheed in 1988. It is not clear whether or not the subject categories that appear on the original inventory list created in 1988 by Sheila McKee reflect the original order in which the photograph files were organized or maintained by Lockheed.