CVL-28 USS Cabot - History

CVL-28 USS Cabot - History


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CVL-28 USS Cabot

(CVL-28: dp. 11,000; 1. 622'6"; b. 71'6"; ew. 109'2";dr. 26'; s. 32 k.; cpl. 1,569; a. 26 40 mm.; cl. Independence)

The second Cabot (CVL-28) was laid down as Wilmington (CL-79), redesignated CV-28 on 2 June 1942 renamed Cabot 23 June 1942, converted while buildingand launched 4 April 1943 by New York Shipbuilding Co., Camden' N.J.; sponsoredby Mrs. A. C. Read; reclassified CVL-28 on 16 July 1943; and commissioned24 July 1943, Captain M. F. Shoeffel in command.

Cabot sailed from Quonset Point' R.I.' 8 November 1943 for Pearl Harbor,where she arrived 2 December. Clearing for Majuro 15 January 1944, she joinedTF 58 to begin the consistently high quality of war service which was towin her a Presidential Unit Citation. From 4 February to 4 March 1944 shelaunched her planes in strikes on Roi, Namur, and the island strongholdof Truk, aiding in the neutralization of these Japanese bases as her partin the invasion of the Marshalls.

Cabot returned to Pearl Harbor for a brief repair period, but was backin action from Majuro for the pounding raids on the Palaus, Yap, Ulithi,and Woleai at the close of March 1944. She sailed to provide valuable aircover for the Hollandia operation from 22 to 25 April, and 4 days laterbegan to hurl her air power at Truk, Satawan, and Ponape. She cleared Majuriagain 6 June for the preinvasion air strikes in the Marianas, and on 19and 20 June launched sorties in the key Battle of the Philippine Sea, thefamous "Marianas Turkey Shoot," which hopelessly crippled Japanesenaval aviation. Cabot's air units pounded Japanese bases on Iwo Jima, Pagian,Rota, Guam, Yap and Ulithi as the carrier continued her support of the Marianasoperation until 9 August.

Preinvasion strikes in the Palaus in September 1944 along with air attackson Mindanao, the Visayas, and Luzon paved the way for the long-awaited returnto the Philippines. On 6 October Cabot sailed from Ulithi for raids on Okinawa,and to provide air cover for her task group during the heavy enemy attacksoff Formosa on 12 and 13 October. (Cabot joined the group which screened"Cripple Division 1," the cruisers Canberra (CA-70) and HoustonCL-81) which had been torpedoed off Formosa, to the safety of the Carolines,then rejoined her group for continued air strikes on the Visayas, and theBattle for Leyte Gulf on 26 and 26 October.

Cabot remained on patrol off Luzon, conducting strikes in support ofoperations ashore, and repelling desperate suicide attacks. On 25 Novembera particularly vicious one occurred. Cabot had fought off several kamikazeswhen one, already flaming from hits, crashed the flight deck on the portside, destroying the still-firing 20 mm. gun platform, disabling the 40mm. mounts and a gun director. Another of Cabot's victims crashed closeaboard and showered the port side with shrapnel and burning debris Cabotlost 62 men killed and wounded, but careful training had produced a crewwhich handled damage control smoothly and coolly. While she continued tomaintain her station in formation and operate effectively, temporary repairswere made. On 28 November she arrived at Ulithi for permanent repairs.

Cabot returned to action 11 December 1944, steaming with the force strikingLuzon, Formosa, Indo-China, Hong Kong, and the Nansei Shoto in support ofthe Luzon operations From 10 February to 1 March 1946, her planes poundedthe Japanese homeland and the Bonins to suppress opposition to the invasionof Iwo Jima. Continued strikes against Kyushu and Okinawa in March preparedfor the invasion of the latter island. After these prolonged, intensiveoperations, Cabot was homeward bound for San Francisco for a much-neededoverhaul completed in June.

After refresher training at Pearl Harbor, the carrier launched strikeson Wake Island on 1 August while en route to Eniwetok. Here she remainedon training duty until the end of the war. Sailing 21 August, she joinedTG 38.3 to support the landings of occupation troops in the Yellow Sea areain September and October. Embarking homeward- bound men at Guam, Cabot arrivedat San Diego 9 November, then sailed for the east coast. Cabot was placedout of commission in reserve at Philadelphia 11 February 1947.

Recommissioned 27 October 1948, Cabot was assigned to the Naval Air Reservetraining program. She operated out of Pensacola, then Quonset Point, oncruises to the Caribbean and had one tour of duty in European waters from9 January to 20 March 1952. Cabot was again placed out of commission inreserve 21 January 1965. She was reclassified AVT-3 on 15 May 1959.

In addition to the Presidential Unit Citation, Cabot received nine battlestars for World War II service.


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Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

The second Cabot (CVL-28) was laid down as Wilmington (CL-79), redesignated CV-28 on 2 June 1942, renamed Cabot 23 June 1942, converted while building, and launched 4 April 1943 by New York Shipbuilding Co., Camden, M.H. sponsored by Mrs. A.C. Read reclassified CVL-28 on 15 July 1943 and commissioned 24 July 1943, Captain M.F. Shoeffel in command.

Cabot sailed from Quonset Point, R.I., 8 November 1943 for Pearl Harbor, where she arrived 2 December. Clearing for Majuro 15 January 1944, she joined TF 58 to begin the consistently high quality of war service which was to win her a Presidential Unit Citation. From 4 February to 4 March 1944 she launched her planes in strikes on Roi, Namur, and the island stronghold of Truk, aiding in the neutralization of these Japanese bases as her part in the invasion of the Marshalls.

Cabot returned to Pearl Harbor for a brief repair period, but was back in action from Majuro for the pounding raids on the Palaus, Yap, Ulithi, and Woleai at the close of March 1944. She sailed to provide valuable air cover for the Hollandia operation from 22 to 25 April, and 4 days later began to hurl her air power at Truk, Satawan, and Ponape. She cleared Majuro again 6 June for the preinvasion air strikes in the Marianas, and on 19 and 20 June launched sorties in the key Battle of the Philippine Sea, the famous "Marianas Turkey Shoot," which hopelessly crippled Japanese naval aviation. Cabot's air units pounded Japanese bases on Iwo Jima, Pagan, Rota, Guam, Yap and Ulithi as the carrier continued her support of the Marianas operation until 9 August.

Preinvasion strikes in the Palaus in September 1944 along with air attacks on Mindanao, the Visayas, and Luzon paved the way for the long-awaited return to the Philippines. On 6 October Cabot sailed from Ulithi for raids on Okinawa, and to provide air cover for her task group during the heavy enemy attacks off Formosa on 12 and 13 October. Cabot joined the group which screened "Cripple Division 1," the cruisers Canberra (CA-70) and Houston (CL-81) which had been torpedoed off Formosa, to the safety of the Carolines, then rejoined her group for continued air strikes on the Visayas, and the Battle for Leyte Gulf on 25 and 26 October.

Cabot remained on patrol off Luzon, conducting strikes in support of operations ashore, and repelling desperate suicide attacks. On 25 November a particularly vicious one occurred. Cabot had fought off several kamikazes when one, already flaming from hits, crashed the flight deck on the port side, destroying the still-firing 20 mm. gun platform, disabling the 40 mm. mounts and a gun director. Another of Cabot's victims crashed close aboard and showered the port side with shrapnel and burning debris. Cabot lost 52 men killed and wounded, but careful training had produced a crew which handled damage control smoothly and coolly. While she continued to maintain her station in formation and operate effectively, temporary repairs were made. On 28 November she arrived at Ulithi for permanent repairs.

Cabot returned to action 11 December 1944, steaming with the force striking Luzon, Formosa, Indo-China, Hong Kong, and the Nansei Shoto in support of the Luzon operations. From 10 February to 1 March 1945, her planes pounded the Japanese homeland and the Bonins to suppress opposition to the invasion of Iwo Jima. Continued strikes against Kyushu and Okinawa in March prepared for the invasion of the latter island. After these pronged, intensive operations, Cabot was homeward bound for San Francisco for a much-needed overhaul completed in June.

After refresher training at Pearl Harbor, the carrier launched strikes on Wake Island on 1 August while en route to Eniwetok. Here she remained on training duty until the end of the war. Sailing 21 August, she joined TG 38.3 to support the landings of occupation troops in the Yellow Sea area in September and October. Embarking homeward-bound men at Guam, Cabot arrived at San Diego 9 November, then sailed for the east coast. Cabot was placed out of commission in reserve at Philadelphia 11 February 1947.

Recommissioned 27 October 1948, Cabot was assigned to he Naval Air Reserve training program. She operated out of Pensacola, then Quonset Point, on cruises to the Caribbean, and had one tour of duty in European waters from 9 January to 26 March 1952. Cabot was again placed out of commission in reserve 21 January 1955. She was reclassified AVT-3 on 15 May 1959.


USS Cabot (CVL-28)

John Cabot (1450-1498), the Venetian navigator, discovered the North American continent in 1497 while sailing under the sponsorship of King Henry VII of England.

The second Cabot (CVL-28) was laid down as Wilmington (CL-79), redesignated CV-28 on 2 June 1942, renamed Cabot 23 June 1942, converted while building, and launched 4 April 1943 by New York Shipbuilding Co., Camden, N.J. sponsored by Mrs. A. C. Read reclassified CVL-28 on 15 July 1943 and commissioned 24 July 1943, Captain M. F. Shoeffel in command.

Cabot sailed from Quonset Point, R.I., 8 November 1943 for Pearl Harbor, where she arrived 2 December. Clearing for Majuro 15 January 1944, she joined TF 58 to begin the consistently high quality of war service which was to win her a Presidentia l Unit Citation. From 4 February to 4 March 1944 she launched her planes in strikes on Roi, Namur, and the island stronghold of Truk, aiding in the neutralization of these Japanese bases as her part in the invasion of the Marshalls.

Cabot returned to Pearl Harbor for a brief repair period, but was back in action from Majuro for the pounding raids on the Palaus, Yap, Ulithi, and Woleai at the close of March 1944. She sailed to provide valuable air cover for the Hollandia ope ration from 22 to 25 April, and 4 days later began to hurl her air power at Truk, Satawan, and Ponape. She cleared Majuro again 6 June for the preinvasion air strikes in the Marianas, and on 19 and 20 June launched sorties in the key Battle of the Phi lippine Sea, the famous "Marianas Turkey Shoot," which hopelessly crippled Japanese naval aviation. Cabot's air units pounded Japanese bases on Iwo Jima, Pagan, Rota, Guam, Yap and Ulithi as the carrier continued her support of the Marianas oper ation until 9 August.

Preinvasion strikes in the Palaus in September 1944 along with air attacks on Mindanao, the Visayas, and Luzon paved the way for the long- awaited return to the Philippines. On 6 October Cabot sailed from Ulithi for raids on Okinawa, and to provid e air cover for her task group during the heavy enemy attacks off Formosa on 12 and 13 October. Cabot joined the group which screened "Cripple Division 1," the cruisers Canberra (CA-70) and Houston (CL-81) which had been torpedoed o ff Formosa, to the safety of the Carolines, then rejoined her group for continued air strikes on then Visayas, and the Battle for Leyte Gulf on 25 and 26 October.

Cabot remained on patrol off Luzon, conducting strikes in support of operations ashore, and repelling desperate suicide attacks. On 25 November a particularly vicious one occurred. Cabot had fought off several kamikazes when one, already flaming from hits, crashed the flight deck on the port side, destroying the still-firing 20 mm. gun platform, disabling the 40 mm. Mounts and a gun director: Another of Cabot's victims crashed close aboard and showered the port side with shrapn el and burning debris. Cabot lost 62 men killed and wounded but careful training had produced a crew which handled damage control smoothly and coolly. While she continued to maintain her station in formation and operate effectively, temporary re pairs were made. On 28 November she arrived at Ulithi for permanent repairs.

Cabot returned to action 11 December 1944, steaming with the force striking Luzon, Formosa, Indo-China, Hong Kong, and the Nansei Shoto in support of the Luzon operations. From 10 February to 1 March 1945 her planes pounded the Japanese homeland and the Bonins to suppress opposition to the invasion of Iwo Jima. Continued strikes against Kyushu and Okinawa in March prepared for the invasion of the latter island. After these prolonged, intensive operations, Cabot was homeward bound for San Francisco for a much-needed overhaul completed in June.

After refresher training at Pearl Harbor, the carrier launched strikes on Wake Island on 1 August while en route to Eniwetok. Here she remained on training duty until the end of the war. Sailing 21 August, she joined TG 38.3 to support the landings of occupation troops in the Yellow Sea area in September and October. Embarking homeward-bound men at Guam, Cabot arrived at San Diego 9 November, then sailed for the east coast. Cabot was placed out of commission in reserve at Philadelphia 11 February 1947.

Recommissioned 27 October 1948, Cabot was assigned to the Naval Air Reserve training program. She operated out of Pensacola, then Quonset Point, on cruises to the Caribbean, and had one tour of duty in European waters from 9 January to 26 March 1952. Cabot was again placed out of commission in reserve 21 January 1955. She was reclassified AVT-3 on 15 May 1959.

In addition to the Presidential Unit Citation, Cabot received nine battle stars for World War II service.


Contents

United States [ edit | edit source ]

World War II (1943-1947) [ edit | edit source ]

Cabot sailed from Naval Air Station Quonset Point, Rhode Island with Air Group 31 aboard, on 8 November 1943 for Pearl Harbor, where she arrived on 2 December. Clearing for Majuro on 15 January 1944, she joined TF 58 to begin the consistently high quality of war service which was to win her a Presidential Unit Citation. From 4 February to 4 March 1944, she launched her planes in strikes on Roi, Namur, and the island stronghold of Truk, aiding in the neutralization of these Japanese bases as her part in the invasion of the Marshalls.

Cabot returned to Pearl Harbor for a brief repair period, but was back in action from Majuro for the pounding raids on the Palaus, Yap, Ulithi, and Woleai at the close of March 1944. She sailed to provide valuable air cover for the Hollandia (currently known as Jayapura) operation from 22–25 April, and 4 days later began to hurl her air power at Truk, Satawan, and Ponape. She cleared Majuro again on 6 June for the preinvasion air strikes in the Mariana Islands, and on 19 and 20 June launched sorties in the key Battle of the Philippine Sea, the famous "Marianas Turkey Shoot", which hopelessly crippled Japanese naval aviation. Cabot ' s air group 31 pounded Japanese bases on Iwo Jima, Pagan, Rota, Guam, Yap and Ulithi as the carrier continued her support of the Marianas operation until 9 August.

Preinvasion strikes in the Palaus in September 1944 along with air attacks on Mindanao, the Visayas, and Luzon paved the way for the long- awaited return to the Philippines. On 6 October, Air Group 29 relieved Air Group 31, and Cabot sailed from Ulithi for raids on Okinawa to provid air cover for her task group during the heavy enemy attacks off Formosa on 12 and 13 October. Cabot joined the group which screened "Cripple Division 1", Canberra and Houston which had been torpedoed off Formosa, to the safety of the Carolines, then rejoined her group for continued air strikes on the Visayas, and the Battle of Leyte Gulf on 25 and 26 October.

Cabot remained on patrol off Luzon, conducting strikes in support of operations ashore, and repelling desperate kamikaze attacks. On 25 November, a particularly vicious one occurred. Cabot had fought off several kamikazes when one, already flaming from hits, crashed the flight deck on the port side, destroying the still-firing 20 mm gun platform, disabling the 40 mm Mounts and a gun director: Another of Cabot ' s victims crashed close aboard and showered the port side with shrapnel and burning debris. 62 men were killed or wounded but careful training had produced a crew which handled damage control smoothly and coolly. While she continued to maintain her station in formation and operate effectively, temporary repairs were made. On 28 November, she arrived at Ulithi for permanent repairs.

Cabot returned to action on 11 December 1944, steaming with the force striking Luzon, Formosa, Indo-China, Hong Kong, and the Nansei Shoto in support of the Luzon operations. From 10 February to 1 March 1945, her planes pounded the Japanese homeland and the Bonins to suppress opposition to the invasion of Iwo Jima. Continued strikes against Kyūshū and Okinawa in March prepared for the invasion of the latter island. After these prolonged, intensive operations, Cabot was homeward bound for San Francisco for a much-needed overhaul completed in June.

After refresher training at Pearl Harbor with Air Group 32 aboard, the carrier launched strikes on Wake Island on 1 August while en route to Eniwetok. Here she remained on training duty until the end of the war. Sailing on 21 August, she joined TG 38.3 to support the landings of occupation troops in the Yellow Sea area in September and October. Embarking homeward-bound men at Guam, Cabot arrived at San Diego on 9 November, then sailed for the east coast. Cabot was placed out of commission in reserve at Philadelphia on 11 February 1947. ΐ]

Post-War (1948-1955) [ edit | edit source ]

Cabot as a training carrier in 1949.

Recommissioned 27 October 1948, Cabot was assigned to the Naval Air Reserve training program. She operated out of Pensacola, then Quonset Point, on cruises to the Caribbean, and had one tour of duty in European waters from 9 January to 26 March 1952. Cabot was again placed out of commission in the reserve fleet at the Philadelphia Naval Yard on 21 January 1955. She was reclassified AVT-3 on 15 May 1959. ΐ]

Spanish Navy [ edit | edit source ]

1967-1989 [ edit | edit source ]

Spanish Navy AV-8S Matador flies over the aircraft carrier Dédalo (R01) (ex-USS Cabot) in 1988

In 1967, after over twelve years in "mothballs", Cabot was loaned to Spain, in whose navy she served with the name of Dédalo and was equipped with the AV-8S Matador. The loan was converted to a sale and USS Cabot was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 1 August 1972. Dedalo was stricken from the Spanish Navy in August 1989 and given to a private organization in the U.S. for conversion to a museum ship.

Preservation attempts (1990-2002) [ edit | edit source ]

Cabot in New Orleans in 1995.

Cabot was designated as a National Historic Landmark on 29 June 1990. Α] The ship spent most of the 1990s berthed in New Orleans. The private groups attempting to preserve her as a memorial were unable to pay creditors and on 10 September 1999 the ship was auctioned off by the U.S. Marshals Service to Sabe Marine Salvage. Its designation as a National Historic Landmark was withdrawn on 7 August 2001. Scrapping of the hulk was completed in 2002. Her island, a small stub of metal and glass, was preserved and is on exhibit at the National Museum of Naval Aviation at NAS Pensacola in Florida since 2007, the last relic of over 100 light aircraft carriers of World War II.

Cabot has a large collection of items at the USS Lexington aircraft museum in Corpus Christi, Texas, including all the guns and the anchor. A museum room contains information, artifacts, and pictures of Cabot.


USS Cabot (CVL 28)

USS CABOT was one of the INDEPENDENCE - class light aircraft carriers and the second ship in the Navy named after John Cabot (1450-1498), the Venetian navigator who discovered the North American continent in 1497 while sailing under the sponsorship of King Henry VII of England. Like the other ships in her class, the CABOT was originally laid down as a light cruiser but following the attack on Pearl Harbor, Hi., the Navy had an urgent need for more aircraft carriers. Therefore, a few of the light cruisers under construction at that time were reordered as aircraft carriers.

Decommissioned on February 11, 1947, the CABOT was recommissioned in October 1948 and served as training carrier until decommissioned again in January 1955. In 1967, the carrier was loaned to the Spanish Navy and recommissioned as DEDALO. Stricken in 1989, the old carrier was given to a private organization in the US for use as a museum ship. These plans, however, did not become true and the CABOT/DEDALO was scrapped in 2000.

General Characteristics: Awarded: 1940 (as light cruiser), 1942 (as aircraft carrier)
Keel laid: June 2, 1942
Launched: April 4, 1943
Commissioned: July 24, 1943
Decommissioned: February 11, 1947
Recommissioned: October 27, 1948
Decommissioned: January 21, 1955
Builder: New York Shipbuilding, Camden, N.J.
Propulsion system: geared turbines, 100,000 shp
Propellers: two
Length: 623 feet (189.9 meters)
Beam: 71.5 feet (21.8 meters)
Draft: 25.9 feet (7.9 meters)
Displacement: approx. 11,000 tons standard
Speed: 31.5 knots
Aircraft: 34
Catapults: two
Aircraft Elevators: two
Armament: 26 x 40mm guns, 5 x 20mm guns
Crew: approx. 1560

This section contains the names of sailors who served aboard USS CABOT. It is no official listing but contains the names of sailors who submitted their information.

USS CABOT was laid down as WILMINGTON (CL 79), redesignated CV 28 on 2 June 1942, renamed CABOT 23 June 1942, converted while building, and launched 4 April 1943 by New York Shipbuilding Co., Camden, N.J. sponsored by Mrs. A. C. Read re-classified CVL 28 on 15 July 1943 and commissioned 24 July 1943, Captain M. F. Shoeffel in command.

CABOT sailed from Quonset Point, R.I., 8 November 1943 for Pearl Harbor, where she arrived 2 December. Clearing for Majuro 15 January 1944, she joined TF 58 to begin the consistently high quality of war service which was to win her a Presidential Unit Citation. From 4 February to 4 March 1944 she launched her planes in strikes on Roi, Namur, and the island stronghold of Truk, aiding in the neutralization of these Japanese bases as her part in the invasion of the Marshalls.

CABOT returned to Pearl Harbor for a brief repair period, but was back in action from Majuro for the pounding raids on the Palaus, Yap, Ulithi, and Woleai at the close of March 1944. She sailed to provide valuable air cover for the Hollandia operation from 22 to 25 April, and 4 days later began to hurl her air power at Truk, Satawan, and Ponape. She cleared Majuro again 6 June for the preinvasion air strikes in the Marianas, and on 19 and 20 June launched sorties in the key Battle of the Philippine Sea, the famous "Marianas Turkey Shoot," which hopelessly crippled Japanese naval aviation. CABOT's air units pounded Japanese bases on Iwo Jima, Pagan, Rota, Guam, Yap and Ulithi as the carrier continued her support of the Marianas operation until 9 August.

Preinvasion strikes in the Palaus in September 1944 along with air attacks on Mindanao, the Visayas, and Luzon paved the way for the long-awaited return to the Philippines. On 6 October CABOT sailed from Ulithi for raids on Okinawa, and to provide air cover for her task group during the heavy enemy attacks off Formosa on 12 and 13 October. CABOT joined the group which screened "Cripple Division 1," the cruisers CANBERRA (CA 70) and HOUSTON (CL 81) which had been torpedoed off Formosa, to the safety of the Carolines, then rejoined her group for continued air strikes on the Visayas, and the Battle for Leyte Gulf on 25 and 26 October.

CABOT remained on patrol off Luzon, conducting strikes in support of operations ashore, and repelling desperate suicide attacks. On 25 November a particularly vicious one occurred. CABOT had fought off several kamikazes when one, already flaming from hits, crashed the flight deck on the port side, destroying the still-firing 20 mm gun platform, disabling the 40 mm mounts and a gun director. Another of CABOT's victims crashed close aboard and showered the port side with shrapnel and burning debris. Cabot lost 62 men killed and wounded, but careful training had produced a crew which handled damage control smoothly and coolly. While she continued to maintain her station in formation and operate effectively, temporary repairs were made. On 28 November she arrived at Ulithi for permanent repairs.

CABOT returned to action 11 December 1944, steaming with the force striking Luzon, Formosa, Indo-China, Hong Kong, and the Nansei Shoto in support of the Luzon operations. From 10 February to 1 March 1945, her planes pounded the Japanese homeland and the Bonins to suppress opposition to the invasion of Iwo Jima. Continued strikes against Kyushu and Okinawa in March prepared for the invasion of the latter island. After these prolonged, intensive operations, CABOT was homeward bound for San Francisco for a much-needed overhaul completed in June.

After refresher training at Pearl Harbor, the carrier launched strikes on Wake Island on 1 August while en route to Eniwetok. Here she remained on training duty until the end of the war. Sailing 21 August, she joined TG 38.3 to support the landings of occupation troops in the Yellow Sea area in September and October. Embarking homeward-bound men at Guam, CABOT arrived at San Diego 9 November, then sailed for the east coast. CABOT was placed out of commission in reserve at Philadelphia 11 February 1947.

Recommissioned 27 October 1948, CABOT was assigned to the Naval Air Reserve training program. She operated out of Pensacola, then Quonset Point, on cruises to the Caribbean, and had one tour of duty in European waters from 9 January to 26 March 1952. CABOT was again placed out of commission in reserve 21 January 1955. She was reclassified AVT 3 on 15 May 1959.

In 1967, after over twelve years in "mothballs", CABOT was loaned to Spain, in whose navy she served as DEDALO. The loan was converted to a sale in 1972. DEDALO was stricken by the Spanish Navy in August 1989 and given to a private organization in the US for use as a museum ship. However, during the subsequent decade plans to memorialize CABOT/DEDALO met with no success, and the now much deteriorated ship was sold for scrapping in 1997. After the failure of a lengthy legal effort to preserve the old carrier, she was cut up at Brownsville, Texas, beginning in November 2000.

Inaddition to the Presidential Unit Citation, CABOT received nine battle stars for World War II service.


USS Cabot (CVL 28)

Decommissioned 11 February 1947.
Recommissioned 27 October 1948.
Decommissioned 21 January 1955.
Transferred to Spain and renamed Dedalo (R-01) and commissioned into the Spanish Navy on 30 August 1967. Decommissioned by the Spanish Navy on 5 August 1989. Scrapped at Brownsville, Texas, USA.

Commands listed for USS Cabot (CVL 28)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1T/R.Adm. Malcolm Francis Schoeffel, USN24 Jul 19435 May 1944
2T/Capt. Stanley John Michael, USN5 May 19446 Feb 1945
3T/Capt. Walton Wiley Smith, USN6 Feb 194518 Dec 1945

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Notable events involving Cabot include:

12 Feb 1944
Task Force 58 departed Majuro Atoll for operation HAILSTONE, a raid against the Japanese base at Truk Atoll.

Task Force 58 was made up of the following ships

Task Group 58.1 Aircraft carriers USS Enterprise (Capt. M.B. Gardner, USN), USS Yorktown (Capt. R.E. Jennings, USN), light carrier USS Belleau Wood (Capt. A.M. Pride, USN), light cruisers Santa Fé (Capt. J. Wright, USN), Mobile (Capt. C.J. Wheeler, USN), Biloxi (Capt. D.M. McGurl, USN), USS Oakland (Capt. W.K. Phillips, USN) and the destroyers USS Clarence K. Bronson (Lt.Cdr. J.C. McGoughran, USN), USS Cotten (Cdr. F.T. Sloat, USN), USS Dortch (Cdr. R.C. Young, USN), USS Gatling (Cdr. A.F. Richardson, USN), USS Healy (Cdr. J.C. Atkeson, USN), USS Cogswell (Cdr. H.T. Deutermann, USN), USS Caperton (Cdr. W.J. Miller, USN), USS Ingersoll (Cdr. A.C. Veasey, USN), USS Knapp (Cdr. F. Virden, USN).

Task Group 58.2 Aircraft carriers USS Essex (Capt. R.A. Ofstie, USN), USS Intrepid (Capt. T.L. Sprague, USN), light carrier USS Cabot (Capt. M.F. Schoeffel, USN), heavy cruisers USS Wichita (Capt J.J. Mahoney, USN), USS Baltimore (Capt. W.C. Calhoun, USN), light cruisers USS San Francisco (Capt. H.E. Overesch, USN), USS San Diego (Capt. L.J. Hudson, USN), destroyers USS Owen (Cdr. R.W. Wood, USN), USS Miller (Cdr. T.H. Kobey, USN), USS The Sullivans (Cdr. K.M. Gentry, USN), USS Stephen Potter (Cdr. C.H. Crichton, USN), USS Hickox (Cdr. W.M. Sweetser, USN), USS Hunt (Cdr. H.A. Knoertzer, USN), USS Lewis Hancock (Cdr. C.H. Lyman, 3rd, USN), USS Stembel (Cdr. W.L. Tagg, USN) and USS Stack (Lt.Cdr. R.E. Wheeler, USN).

Task Group 58.3 Aircraft carrier USS Bunker Hill (Capt. T.P. Jeter, USN), light carriers USS Monterey (Capt. L.T. Hundt, USN), USS Cowpens (Capt. R.P. McConnell, USN), battleships USS North Carolina (Capt. F.P. Thomas, USN), USS Massachusetts (Capt. T.D. Ruddock, Jr., USN), USS South Dakota (Capt. A.E. Smith, USN), USS Alabama (Capt. F.D. Kirtland, USN), USS Iowa (Capt. J.L. McCrea, USN), USS New Jersey (Capt. C.F. Holden, USN), heavy cruisers USS Minneapolis (Capt. R.W. Bates, USN), USS New Orleans (Capt. S.R. Shumaker, USN), destroyers USS Izard (Cdr. E.K. van Swearingen, USN), USS Charrette (Cdr. E.S. Karpe, USN), USS Conner (Cdr. W.E. Kaitner, USN), USS Bell (Cdr. L.C. Petross, USN), USS Burns (Cdr. D.T. Eller, USN), USS Bradford (Cdr. R.L. Morris, USN), USS Brown (Cdr. T.H. Copeman, USN), USS Cowell (Cdr. C.W. Parker, USN), USS Wilson (Lt.Cdr. C.K. Duncan, USN), USS Sterett (Lt.Cdr. F.J.L. Blouin, USN) and USS Lang (Cdr. H. Payson, Jr., USN).

25 Nov 1944
2 kamikazes attacked vessel off the Philippine coast. 36 men killed, many wounded. Vessel remained in fighting condition. ( 1 )

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CVL-28 USS Cabot - History

The USS Cabot was the 7th of 9 Independence Class Light Aircraft Carriers which were started from May 1, 1941 through October 26, 1942 at the New York Ship Building Yard in Camden New Jersey.

The keel of the light aircraft carrier USS Cabot (CVL-28) was laid down as the light cruiser Wilmington (CL-79) on March 16, 1942. On June 2, 1942 the under construction cruiser Wilmington was ordered to be converted into a light aircraft carrier by the addition of a hanger deck and flight deck above that.

Specifications:

Design Displacement: 14,200 tons
Full load Displacement: 15,100 tons
Overall Length: 622' 6"
Waterline Length: 600'
Beam (Extreme): 109' 2"
Beam Waterline: 71' 6"
Flight Deck: 572' x 73'
Catapult: 1 H 2-1 Hydraulic
Propulsion: 4 Babcock & Wilson 565 psi boilers,
4 shaft geared turbines,100,000 shp
Machinery: 4 - 600kw ships service generators
2 - 250kw diesel generators
Fuel Capacity: 2,632.2 tons
Aviation Gas: 122,243 gallons
Aviation Ordinance: 331.4 tons
Top Speed: 31.6 knots
Crew: 1,461
Armor: 3-5 inch belt
Armament: 2 quad, 8 dual 40 mm AA,
16 single 20 mm AA
Aircraft: 45 (maximum) 32 (nominal)

USS Cabot was launched on April 4, 1943 and commissioned on July 24, 1943. Her 1 month shake down cruse to Trinidad was undertaken September after which she left for Pear Harbor and joined Task Force 58 for action in the pacific.

USS Cabot carried Air Group 31 from the time of her shake down cruse until they were rotated out of active duty in October of 1944. Air Group 31 was replaced by Air Group 29 who served aboard her until July 11, 1945 when they were relieved by Air Group 32 who served for the last 6 weeks until the end of hostilities.

The famous Scripps-Howard war corespondent Ernie Pyle came on board the USS Cabot for a time. He wrote his famous "Iron Woman" story while he was aboard USS Cabot

USS Cabot was stuck by a Kamikaze on November 25, 1944. This caused the death of 62 of her crew but the ship was saved. She was repaired at the advance fleet anchorage of Ulithi and returned to duty on December 11, 1944. She was send to be overhauled in San Francisco in March 1945 and returned to the Pacific in late June 1945. USS Cabot stayed on station during September and October 1945 in the Yellow Sea supporting the occupation. Cabot was used to transport returning men from Guam to San Diego, arriving on November 9, 1945. USS Cabot then returned via the Panama Canal to the Philadelphia Naval Yard where she was docked along with 2 CVL aircraft carriers and other vessels.

USS Cabot received the Presidential Unit Citation and 9 gold battle stars for her service in World War II

USS Cabot was decommissioned to reserve status on February 11, 1946 at the Philadelphia Naval Yard.

Re-commissioned on October 27, 1948 she was modernized which included combining her existing 4 funnels into 2. Cabot served as a Naval Aviation Reserve Training carrier operating out of NAS Pensacola, then NAS Quonset Point, on training cruises to the Caribbean. She had one tour of duty in European and Mediterranean waters from January to March 1952 and served as an ASW (Anti Submarine Warfare) carrier

USS Cabot was decommissioned to reserve status once again on January 21, 1955

While still in reserve status USS Cabot was re-designated as an aircraft transport carrier (AVT-3) on May 15, 1959.

USS Cabot was reactivated, overhauled and modernized at the Philadelphia Naval Yard from 1965 - 1967 in preparation for loan to Spain.

USS Cabot was re-commissioned as the Spanish Naval Ship SNS Dedalo (AO-1) on August 30, 1967.

USS Cabot was stricken from the U.S. Naval records on August 1, 1972 and sold to Spain on December 5, 1972.

USS Cabot served the Spanish Navy as SNS Dedalo from 1967 through 1989 first as a helicopter carrier and later as a Harrier jump jet carrier.

The Government of Spain decommissioned and gave USS Cabot / SNS Dedalo to the Cabot/Dedalo foundation on August 5, 1989 in New Orleans Louisiana. At that time the USS Cabot was in just about the same condition as she was when she served the US Navy in 1944-1945, retaining all of her war time machinery and fittings, including the original WW II AA guns and interior.

The Cabot/Dedalo foundation tried, unsuccessfully, to find a permanent home for the ship but while awaiting a permanent location the USS Cabot sat at an unused wharf in New Orleans from 1989 until she was ordered removed by the Coast Guard as a hazard to navigation on September 10, 1997.

On October 13, 1997 the USS Cabot was dead towed from her berth in the Mississippi River to Port Isabel Texas. She stayed moored in Port Isabel Texas from October 1997 until August 8, 1998 when she was once again dead towed to Brownsville Texas for breaking.

A US Court ordered the sale of the USS Cabot to clear the debts that had amassed over the years and on September 10, 1999 USS Cabot was sold to the Sable Marine salvage company for the high bid of $185,000.00

Breaking of the USS Cabot started in October 2000 and the last of the Cabot was cut up in March 2003


CVL-28 USS Cabot - History

Description: History of the U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS Cabot (CVL-28) including information about asbestos exposure for workers.

The USS Cabot was originally planned as the USS Wilmington (CL-79). She was ordered for the U.S. Navy during World War II. Her keel was laid down at the New York Shipbuilding Corporation on March 16, 1942. She was launched on April 4, 1943 and commissioned on July 24, 1943 under the command of Captain M.F. Shoeffel.

USS Cabot arrived in the South Pacific at the start of 1944. Throughout February and March, her planes took part in the air strikes against Roi, Namur, Truk, the Palaus, Yap, Ulithi, and Woleai. From April 22 to April 25, she provided air cover at Hollandia before moving on to Truk, Satawan, and Ponape.

On June 6, the USS Cabot headed to the Mariana Islands for pre-invasion air strikes. Her aircraft were active in the Battle of the Philippine Sea later that month, a decisive victory for the Americans that was later referred to as the “Marianas Turkey Shoot.” She remained to support the strikes on Iwo Jima, Pagan, Rota, Guam, Yap, and Ulithi until August 9, 1944.

In September, USS Cabot participated in pre-invasion air strikes on the Palaus, Mindanao, the Visayas, and Luzon. She sailed to Okinawa in October and supported operations at Formosa before escorting two cruisers, the USS Canberra and USS Houston, to the Carolines after they were torpedoed. When they arrived there safely, the aircraft carrier returned to carry out air strikes on the Visayas and take part in the Battle of Leyte Gulf.

While patrolling the waters off Luzon, the USS Cabot fought off numerous kamikaze attacks. On November 25, two of the kamikazes she’d hit crashed into the ship. The first kamikaze crashed into the flight deck, taking out the 20 mm gun platform, the 40 mm gun mounts, and a gun director. The second kamikaze scattered the port side with burning debris and shrapnel. In the end, 62 men were either dead or injured. The aircraft carrier made temporary repairs and maintained her position until she headed to Ulithi for permanent repairs on November 28.

When her repair work was done, USS Cabot returned to the fighting on December 11. Her planes carried out air strikes against Luzon, Formosa, Indochina, Hong Kong, and Nansei Shoto. From February to March 1945, she supported operations in the Bonins, Kyushu, and Okinawa. By June, USS Cabot was ready for a much-needed overhaul, and she sailed home to San Francisco.

USS Cabot returned to action later that summer, launching air strikes against Wake Island on August 1. She then sailed to Eniwetok for training duty until the war ended. The carrier joined Task Group 38.3 in support of the landings of occupation forces in September and October before taking part in Operation Magic Carpet on her way home.

The USS Cabot was decommissioned on February 11, 1947, but later recommissioned on October 27, 1948 to serve in the Naval Air Reserve training program, operating out of Pensacola and Quonset Point. She was decommissioned again on January 21, 1955 and reclassified AVT-3 on May 15, 1959.

In 1967, the USS Cabot was loaned to the Spanish Navy, where she was known as Dedalo. The loan became a sale in 1972, but she was struck from the Spanish Navy in August 1989. The carrier was turned over to a private organization in the United States to be converted into a museum ship, and she was designated a National Historical Landmark on June 29, 1990. Unfortunately, the organization was never able to obtain enough funding, and the ship was auctioned off and sold for scrap on September 10, 1999. The ship was no longer designated as National Historical Landmark as of August 7, 2001, and she was finally scrapped in 2002. The USS Cabot earned nine battle stars and a Presidential Unit Citation for her service in World War II.

Like all other ships of the World War II era, the USS Cabot was built using many asbestos-containing materials. Asbestos was known for its resistance to heat, fire, water, and corrosion, so it could be found in virtually all areas of the ship and in the aircraft she carried. Anyone who served on or participated in the repair and overhaul of the aircraft carrier was put at risk of developing serious asbestos-related illnesses like asbestosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma, a rare by deadly form of cancer that attacks the protective lining surrounding the lungs and other organs.

USS Cabot workers should monitor their health carefully, and consult a doctor if they experience any symptoms associated with mesothelioma. Anyone who worked on or around the USS Cabot, and is diagnosed with mesothelioma, should also consider contacting a lawyer to discuss their legal rights.


The island of USS Cabot (CVL-28) Independence-class light aircraft carrier, preserved in the National Museum of Naval Aviation at NAS Pensacola after efforts to preserve the last remaining WWII light carrier proved unsuccessful and her National Historic Landmark designation was rescinded.[1024x680]

EDIT: Turns out I got my facts wrong, that's not the original island apparently, but a replica built using the original plans, the original island was apparently saved before being scrapped in Brownsville, Texas. It may become part of a museum or memorial, I can't find anymore info, sorry for the misleading title, that's what I get for blindly trusting wikipedia.

EDIT 2: Found this depressing video on the fate of the island- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BlJIzmoTDJM Guess that's the final piece of the Cabot, scrapped and mangled, sad to see.

It's a darn shame we weren't able to preserve even one WWII light carrier as a museum ship, the rest of her was scrapped in 2002.

One more image here, I must say they have a rather nice and creative display going on- http://i.imgur.com/laPqKp5.jpg

Oh man that is sad. To think it was just used for scrap metal. I want to buy that thing and build it onto a house.

USS Cabot (CVL-28/AVT-3) was an Independence-class aircraft carrier in the United States Navy, the second ship to carry the name. Cabot was commissioned in 1943 and served until 1947. She was recommissioned as a training carrier from 1948 to 1955. From 1967 to 1989, she served in Spain as Dédalo. After attempts to preserve her failed, she was scrapped in 2002.

USS Cabot was laid down as Wilmington (CL-79), redesignated CV-28 on 2 June 1942, renamed Cabot on 23 June 1942 and converted while building. She was launched on 4 April 1943 by New York Shipbuilding Company, Camden, New Jersey sponsored by Mrs. A. C. Read. She was reclassified CVL-28 on 15 July 1943 and commissioned on 24 July 1943, with [Captain](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Captain_(naval)) Malcolm Francis Schoeffel in command.

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Contents

This a chronological list of named operations involving aircraft carriers combining USN, RN, and IJN operations for Atlantic and Pacific theaters. Dates are for carrier involvement, not necessarily the dates for the entire operation.

Named World War II Military Operations Involving Aircraft Carriers
Name Navy Action Begin End Task Force Carriers
1940
Hurry RN Deliver Aircraft to Malta 31 July 1940 4 August 1940 Force H Argus, Ark Royal
Hat RN Reinforce Eastern Mediterranean Fleet Deliver Supplies to Malta 30 August 1940 5 Sept 1940 Force H & Force F Ark Royal, Illustrious
Coat RN Deliver Aircraft to Malta Nov 1940 Nov 1940 Force H Argus, Ark Royal, Illustrious
FU IJN Invasion of French Indochina 22 September 1940 26 September 1940 CarDiv2 Soryu, Hiryu
Judgment RN Raid on Toranto, Italy 11 November 1940 12 November 1940 Force H Illustrious
1941
Express RN Convoys to Malta, Greece, & Egypt 10 January 1941 11 January 1941 Force A Illustrious
Grog RN Raids on Genoa and La Spezia, Italy 9 February 1941 9 February 1941 Force H Ark Royal
11 "Club Runs" RN Deliver Aircraft to Malta Apr 1941 Oct 1941 Force H Ark Royal, Furious, Victorious
EF RN Raid on Kirkenes, Norway and Petsamo, Finland 30 July 1941 30 July 1941 Victorious, Furious
Halberd RN Escort Convoy to Malta 27 September 1941 27 September 1941 Force H Ark Royal
Perpetual RN Deliver Aircraft to Malta 11 October 1941 12 October 1941 Force H Argus, Ark Royal (sunk)
AI IJN Raid on Pearl Harbor 7 December 1941 7 December 1941 Kido Butai Akagi, Kaga, Sōryū, Hiryū, Shōkaku, Zuikaku
M IJN Invasion of the Philippines 8 December 1941 20 December 1941 Ryūjō
1942
R IJN Invasion of Rabaul and Kavieng 4 January 1942 Feb 1942 Akagi, Kaga, Shōkaku, Zuikaku
H IJN Invasion of Ambon and Timor 30 January 1942 3 February 1942 CarDiv2 Soryu, Hiryu
14 "Club Runs" RN Deliver Aircraft to Malta Feb 1942 Oct 1942 Force H HMS Eagle, HMSArgus, HMS Furious, USS Wasp
Revenge USN Raids on Kwajalein, Wotje, and Maloelap, Marshall Islands 1 February 1942 February 1942 TF-8 Enterprise, Yorktown
J IJN Invasion of Java, NEI) 14 February 1942 27 February 1942 Ryūjō
L, T IJN Invasion of Sumatra, NEI) 14 February 1942 28 March 1942 Ryūjō
Revenge 3 USN Raid on Lae & Salamaua 10 March 1942 10 Mar 42 TF-11 Lexington, Yorktown
D IJN Invasion of the Andaman Islands 23 March 1942 23 March 1942 CarDiv4 Ryūjō
C IJN Indian Ocean raid 31 March 1942 10 April 1942 Kido Butai Akagi, Sōryū, Hiryū, Shōkaku, Zuikaku
Mo IJN Planned Invasion of Port Moresby, New Guinea 4 April 1942 8 April 1942 ? Shōkaku, Zuikaku, Shōhō
Shangri-la USN Doolittle Raid on Tokyo 18 April 1942 18 April 1942 TF-18,16 Hornet, Enterprise
Calendar RN Deliver Aircraft to Malta 20 April 1942 20 April 1942 Force W USS Wasp
Bowery RN Deliver Aircraft to Malta 9 May 1942 9 May 1942 Force W USS Wasp, HMS Eagle
AL IJN Invasion of Aleutian Islands 3 June 1942 15 August 1943 Ryūjō , Jun'yō
MI IJN Battle of Midway 4 June 1942 7 June 1942 Kido Butai Akagi, Kaga, Sōryū, Hiryū
Pedestal RN Convoy from Gibraltar to Malta 3 August 1942 15 August 1942 Force F? Victorious, Eagle (sunk), Indomitable
Watchtower USN Invasion of Guadalcanal 7 August 1942 9 February 1943 TF-11, 16, 18 Saratoga, Enterprise, Wasp
Ka IJN Battle of the Eastern Solomons 24 August 1942 25 August 1942 Shōkaku, Zuikaku, Ryūjō
? IJN Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands 25 October 1943 27 October 1943 ? Shōkaku, Zuikaku, Zuihō (also ? Junyo, Hiyo )
Torch USN/RN Invasion of French North Africa 8 November 1942 16 November 1942 TF-38, ? 9 carriers [MORE HERE]
1943
Ke IJN Evacuation of Guadalcanal 14 January 1943 7 February 1943 Zuikaku, Zuihō. Junyo
I-Go IJN Raids Against Allied Advances in Solomons & New Guinea 1 April 1943 19 April 1943 CarDiv 1, 2 Zuikaku, Zuihō, Junyo, Hiyo
Toenails USN Invasion of New Georgia 26 June 1943 25 August 1943 TG-36.3 USS Saratoga, HMS Victorious
Husky RN/USN Invasion of Sicily 9 July 1943 16 July 1943 Allied HMS Indomitable
Cherryblossem USN Invasion of Bougainville 21 October 1943 11 November 1943 TF-38 Saratoga
Galvanic USN Invasion of Tarawa & Makin, Gilbert Islands 18 November 1943 23 November 1943 TG-50.4 5 CVE
1944
Flintlock USN Invasion of Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands 27 January 1944 2 February 1944 TF-58 12 carriers
Catchpole USN Invasion of Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands 13 February 1944 28 February 1944 TF-58 12 carriers?
Hailstone USN Raid on Truk, Caroline Islands 17 February 1944 18 February 1944 TF-58 5 CV, 4 CVL
Desecrate 1 USN Raids on Palau Islands 30 March 1944 31 March 1944 TF-58 7 CV, 5 CVL
Tungsten RN Raid on battleship Tirpitz at Kaafjord, Norway 3 April 1944 3 April 1944 Force 1, 2 Victorious, Furious, 4 CVE (Emperor, Pursuer, Searcher, Fencer)
Cockpit RN Raid on Sabang, Sumatra, Netherlands East Indies 19 April 1944 19 April 1944 BEF/70 HMS Illustrious, USS Saratoga
Reckless USA Invasion of Hollandia, New Guinea 22 April 1944 26 April 1944 TF-58 Enterprise, 8 CVE
Persecution USA Invasion of Aitape, New Guinea 22 April 1944 4 May 1944 TF-58 Enterprise
Ridge Able RN Raid on German Shipping off Norway 26 April 1944 26 April 1944 CVE Emperor
Croquet RN Raid on German Shipping off Norway 6 May 1944 6 May 1944 Furious, CVE Searcher
Hoops RN Raid on German Shipping off Norway 8 May 1944 8 May 1944 3 CVE (Searcher, Striker, Emperor
Transom RN Raid on Surabaya, Java 17 May 1944 17 May 1944 BEF/70 HMS Illustrious?, USS Saratoga
Wanderers RN Diversion to keep U-boats away from Normandy June 1944 June 1944 2 CVE (Fencer, Striker)
Neptune RN Prevent U-boat activity at Normandy June 1944 June 1944 3 CVE (Emperor, Tracker, Pursuer)
Anvil/Dragoon USN Invasion of Southern France 15 August 1944 14 September 1944 TF-88 9 CVE (6 UK, 2 US?)
Outing I RN Raids on Axis Shipping in the Aegean 9 September 1944 9 September 1944 4 UK CVE?
Stalemate II USN Invasion of Peleliu, Paulus Islands 15 September 1944 27 November 1944 TF-38, 32 3 CV, 5 CVL,11 CVE
Lycidas RN Minelaying off Norway 15 October 1944 15 October 1944 2 CVE (Fencer, Trumpeter)
??Forager USN Invasion of Palaus Islands June 1944 Nov 44?
??Forager USN Invasion of Mariana Islands June 1944
A-Go IJN Defense of the Mariana Islands 19 June 1944 20 June 1944 9 carriers
King II USN Invasion of Leyte, Philippines 17 October 1944 26 December 1944 TF-38 8 CV, 8 CVL, 18 CVE
Sho-Go IJN Defense of Philippines 23 October 1944 26 October 1944
Love III USN ? Strikes on Luzon and Mindoro Landing 25 November 1944 ? December 1944 TF-38 ?
1945
Meridian RN Raid on Palembang, Sumatra 24 January 1945 29 January 1945 BPF/Force 63 Illustrious, Indefatigable, Indomitable, Victorious
Mike I USN Invasion of Lingayen Gulf, Philippines 9 January 1945 ? TF-38 ?
Jamboree USN Raids on Tokyo 16 February 1945 26 February 1945 TF-58 11 CV, 5 CVL,
Detachment USN Invasion of Iwo Jima, Vulcano Islnds 19 February 1945 26 March 1945 TF-58, 50 12 CV, 5 CVL, 9 CVE
Iceberg USN Invasion of Okinawa 1 April 1945 22 June 1945
Teardrop USN Anti-sub US east coast Apr 1945 May 1945

Aircraft carriers were involved in many attacks and support activities in addition to the better known major carrier battles. The more complete list below includes battles, invasions, and raids and names the specific carriers involved. "Naval battle" refers to a navel engagement entirely on water, "invasion" refers to an operation involving amphibious landing of troops to occupy land areas, and "raid" refers to attacks without the intention to occupy the land areas involved. Also included in the list are some transport, convoy escort, and antisubmarine warfare operations.

[INVOLVMENT OF ESCORT CARRIERS REPORTED BY Y'BLOOD HAS NOT YET BEEN COMPLETELY INCLUDED IN THE LIST BELOW]


Watch the video: uss cabot dedalo 1943 1989 segunda parte