MP40 Maschinenpistole (Sub-machinegun)

MP40 Maschinenpistole (Sub-machinegun)


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MP40 Maschinenpistole (Sub-machinegun)

The MP40 Sub-machinegun (MP standing for Maschinenpistole or Machine Pistol), chambered for 9x19mm Parabellum

Picture released by J JMesserly under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License


Maschinenpistole MP40 - Denix®

MP40 Maschinenpistole non-firing full-size replica used by the German army. This would make a great addition to any collectors or reenactors. Like all Denix Weapons, this prop replica uses metal (except for the plastic grips and sides), removable magazinne and contains movable parts and springs. Made by Denix®.

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Accessories

Replica of MP38/40 pouches, made using 100% brown canvas .

MP40 leather sling with frog. WK2-reproduction - best quality around.

More info

The MP 40 descended from its predecessor, the MP 38, which was in turn based on the MP 36, a prototype made of machined steel. The MP 36 was developed independently by Erma Werke's Berthold Geipel with funding from the German Army. It took design elements from Heinrich Vollmer's VPM 1930 and EMP. Vollmer then worked on Berthold Geipel's MP 36 and in 1938 submitted a prototype to answer a request from the German Armament services for a new submachine gun, which was adopted as MP 38. The MP 38 was a simplification of the MP 36, and the MP 40 was a further simplification of the MP 38, with certain cost-saving alterations, notably in the more extensive use of stamped steel rather than machined parts.

The MP 40 was often called the "Schmeisser" by the Allies, after weapons designer Hugo Schmeisser. Schmeisser had designed the MP 18, which was the first mass-produced submachine gun, and saw extensive service at the end of the First World War. He did not, however, design the MP 40, although he held a patent on the magazine. He later designed the MP 41, which was an MP 40 with a wooden rifle stock and a selector, identical to those found on the earlier MP 28 submachine gun. The MP 41 was not introduced as a service weapon with the German Army, but saw limited use with some SS and police units. They were also exported to Germany's ally, Romania. The MP 41's production run was brief, as Erma filed a successful patent infringement lawsuit against Schmeisser's employer, Haenel.


Submachine Gun

Designed in 1938 by Heinrich Vollmer with inspiration from its predecessor the MP 38, it was heavily used by infantrymen (particularly platoon and squad leaders), and by paratroopers, on the Eastern and Western Fronts. Its advanced and modern features made it a favorite among soldiers and popular in countries from various parts of the world after the war. It was often called "Schmeisser" by the Allies, after Hugo Schmeisser who designed the MP 18, although he was not involved in the design or production of the MP40. The weapon's other variants included MP 40/I and the MP 41. From 1940 to 1945, an estimated 1.1 million were produced by Erma Werke.


MP40 Maschinenpistole (Sub-machinegun) - History

A submachine gun is an automatic carbine designed to fire pistol cartridges. Invented during World War I (1914-1918) the zenith of submachine gun use was reached during 1939-1945, World War II. Due to poor accuracy past 50-100 yards and their inability to penetrate their targets at mid range, the submachine gun has been replaced by carbine-length assault rifles in military use. Police SWAT teams still value submachine guns for its original intend of use accuracy in burst and fully automated mode combined with their lighter weight in close range situations.

Initial attempts to modify the Luger and Mauser C96 pistols failed and it was determined that a new type of weapon was needed. The development team at the Bergmann Waffenfabrik consisted of several technicians including Theodor Bergmann and Hugo Schmeisser, creating the MP18.1. Full scale production did not begin unitl early 1918. The MP18.1 proved to be an excellent weapon. Its concept was well proven in trench fights. Its basic design directly influenced later submachine gun designs and showed its superiority versus the regular infantry rifle in urban combat and mobile warfare as well as in guerrilla warfare.


Is mp40 a submachine gun?

Loosely derived from the earlier MP18 which was deployed late in World War I as a trench sweeper for the German army, the MP40 fires a 9mm pistol round out of a nearly 10-inch barrel. That's a good combo for an accurate, easy to control weapon.

Also Know, what is the difference between mp38 and mp40? They are more alike than different, but there are differences. The MP38 was made with several parts of machined steel, while the MP40 used many sheet metal stampings. Other improvements occurred during development of the MP38 and MP40, but were not limited to the implementation of the new model.

Furthermore, how common was the mp40?

The MP40 is a compact killing machine that was particularly useful during street fighting &mdash such as in Stalingrad &mdash or in Berlin during the final days of the war. Erma Werke churned out more than a million MP40s. But despite portrayals in popular culture, the MP40 was not the most common weapon issued to German troops.


Design [ edit | edit source ]

A soldier of the Russian Liberation Army with an MP 38.

Both MP 38 and MP 40 submachine guns are open-bolt, blowback-operated automatic arms. Fully automatic fire was the only setting, but the relatively low rate of fire allowed for single shots with controlled trigger pulls. The bolt features a telescoping return spring guide which serves as a pneumatic recoil buffer. The cocking handle was permanently attached to the bolt on early MP 38s, but on late production MP 38s and MP 40s, the bolt handle was made as a separate part. It also served as a safety by pushing the head of handle into one of two separate notches above the main opening this action locked the bolt either in the cocked (rear) or uncocked (forward) position. The absence of this feature on early MP 38s resulted in field expedients such as leather harnesses with a small loop, used to hold the bolt in forward position. Γ]

The MP 38 receiver was made of machined steel, but this was a time-consuming and expensive process. To save time and materials, and thus increase production, construction of the MP 40 receiver was simplified by using stamped steel and electro-spot welding as much as possible. The MP 38 also features longitudinal grooving on the receiver and bolt, as well as a circular opening on the magazine housing. These features were eliminated on the M38/40 and MP 40.

One unique feature found on on most MP 38 and MP 40 submachine guns was an aluminum, steel, or bakelite resting bar or support under the barrel. This was used to steady the weapon when firing over the side of open-top armored personnel carriers such as the Sdkfz 251 half-track. A handguard, made of a synthetic material derived from bakelite, was located between the magazine housing and the pistol grip. The barrel lacked any form of insulation, which often resulted in burns on the supporting hand if it was incorrectly positioned. The MP 38 and MP 40 also had a forward-folding metal stock, the first for a submachine gun, Δ] resulting in a shorter overall weapon when folded however, this stock design was at times insufficiently durable for hard combat use.

A Wehrmacht soldier with an MP 40/I in 1944.

Although the MP 40 was generally reliable, a major weakness was its 32-round magazine. Unlike the double-column, dual-feed magazine insert found on the Thompson M1921-28 variants, the MP 38 and MP 40 used a double-column, single-feed insert. The single-feed insert resulted in increased friction against the remaining cartridges moving upwards towards the feed lips, occasionally resulting in feed failures this problem was exacerbated by the presence of dirt or other debris. Ε] Another problem was that the magazine was also sometimes misused as a handhold. This could cause the weapon to malfunction when hand pressure on the magazine body caused the magazine lips to move out of the line of feed, since the magazine well did not keep the magazine firmly locked. German soldiers were trained to grasp either the handhold on the underside of the weapon or the magazine housing with the supporting hand to avoid feed malfunctions. Ζ] Η]


MP40 SUB-MACHINE GUN, GERMANY 1940

Reproduction of a submachine gun, made of metal and plastic, with simulated loading and firing mechanism, removable magazine and adjustable leather belt.

The MP40 (Maschinenpistole 40) was designed by Heinrich Vollmer in 1940, with the aim of equipping German soldiers with an assault weapon. It used magazines of 32 cartridges of 9mm and its effective range was about 100-150 meters. It was a very reliable weapon and it was very economical to manufacture. It had a relatively weak recoil even when firing in bursts, due to its low rate of fire this allowed it to be more precise for the close range (urban areas, forests, etc.) than other submachine guns of that same period, but it was less effective in the open areas because of its limited reach this was one of the reasons that motivated the design of the Stg-44, the predecessor of modern assault rifles.

This automatic submachine gun was widely used by the Nazi Germany troops (usually by officers, mechanized infantry and paratroopers) during the Second World War, a global military conflict that occurred between 1939 and 1945, in which most of the nations of the world were involved, including all the great powers, grouped in two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis Powers. It was the greatest war in history, in which these great contenders applied all their economic, military and scientific capacity to the service of the war effort, erasing the distinction between civil and military resources.

By the end of the war approximately 1.047.000 submachine guns had been manufactured, thousands of them were captured by the Red Army. It was also involved in the Indochina conflict by the French army and later in the Korean and Vietnam wars.

Recreate the most famous battles of World War II with the historical reproduction of this Denix submachine gun!


Although the MP 40 was generally reliable, a major weakness was its 32-round magazine. Unlike the double-column, dual-feed magazine insert found on the Thompson M1921-28 variants, the MP 38 and MP 40 used a double-column, single-feed insert. The single-feed insert resulted in increased friction against the remaining cartridges moving upwards towards the feed lips, occasionally resulting in feed failures this problem was exacerbated by the presence of dirt or other debris.

General Helmuth Weidling's adjutant also carries an MP40, which he turns in before entering the Bunker.

Several members of the Waffen SS are seen armed with MP40 sub-machine guns, most notably one of the two guards at the bunker's exit cube, when preparing to cremate Goebbels' remains. Peter Högl also carried one, which he used it to finish Fegelein off.


MP40 sub-machine gun, Germany 1940

Reproduction of a submachine gun, made of metal and plastic, with simulated loading and firing mechanism, removable magazine and adjustable leather belt.

The MP40 (Maschinenpistole 40) was designed by Heinrich Vollmer in 1940, with the aim of equipping German soldiers with an assault weapon. It used magazines of 32 cartridges of 9mm and its effective range was about 100-150 meters. It was a very reliable weapon and it was very economical to manufacture. It had a relatively weak recoil even when firing in bursts, due to its low rate of fire this allowed it to be more precise for the close range (urban areas, forests, etc.) than other submachine guns of that same period, but it was less effective in the open areas because of its limited reach this was one of the reasons that motivated the design of the Stg-44, the predecessor of modern assault rifles.

This automatic submachine gun was widely used by the Nazi Germany troops (usually by officers, mechanized infantry and paratroopers) during the Second World War, a global military conflict that occurred between 1939 and 1945, in which most of the nations of the world were involved, including all the great powers, grouped in two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis Powers. It was the greatest war in history, in which these great contenders applied all their economic, military and scientific capacity to the service of the war effort, erasing the distinction between civil and military resources.

By the end of the war approximately 1.047.000 submachine guns had been manufactured, thousands of them were captured by the Red Army. It was also involved in the Indochina conflict by the French army and later in the Korean and Vietnam wars.

Recreate the most famous battles of World War II with the historical reproduction of this Denix submachine gun!
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Guns and Money, a WW2 Price List Rifles and Machine-guns

In 1941, World War II was going well for Germany. The forces of the Third Reich had successfully overrun the Greek islands and Balkan states, and the Fuhrer was beginning to size up further prizes.

There was a finely balanced choice between taking on the British Royal Navy, expanding across the Mediterranean and into the Middle East, or perhaps taking on a Soviet Red Army still reeling from Stalin’s recent purges. Germany’s biggest asset was the size and expertise of its continental land army, so invading the Soviet Union with the addition of Finnish and Romanian divisions looked like the best way forward.

Without doubt, Operation Barbarossa had initial successes, but it also changed the way the German army used firearms, accelerating the production and use of the MP 40 Maschinenpistole.

German soldier with an MP 40 on the Eastern Front, 1944. By Bundesarchiv – CC BY-SA 3.0 de

At the Battle of Leningrad (present day St. Petersburg), German troops toting their assault rifles were met by return fire from Soviet submachine guns. The siege that followed has resulted in classic sniper tales with a focus on rifle sights, and serves to highlight the very different battle functions of both firearms.

Antiaircraft-gunners firing at the enemy in besieged Leningrad.

Rifles

The role of the rifle in battle had changed dramatically since its mass introduction as a marksman’s lead gun in the trenches of World War I, where an enemy would be engaged at a distance. In WWII rifles served in a supporting role to machine guns and SMGs. There were some effective innovations, including the addition of a grenade launcher to the Mauser 98k.

Karabiner 98k in mint condition, made in 1940.

The Mauser 98k was the standard issue rifle for the German army, and production costs at the beginning of the war were around $28 per unit. A collectible WWII Mauser in good condition today will cost you between $2,000 and $4,000.

Private of the Panzer-Grenadier-Division Großdeutschland with Karabiner 98k and mounted Schießbecher. Photo by Bundesarchiv, Bild 101I-732-0123-15 / Pfeiffer / CC-BY-SA 3.0

Millions of these rifles were captured by Soviet forces, and so many others were manufactured and then stored that they continued to be used in battle for decades after WWII. Mausers were even being used during the Balkans conflicts of the 1990s, during the breakup of Yugoslavia.

The U.S. Army had the M1 Garand rifle which, in 1942, cost the U.S. government $83 each. Following years of cost-reduction engineering, that price dropped to $31 in 1945.

John Garand points out features of the M1 to army generals.

Legendary General George S. Patton, Jr. said of the M1, “In my opinion, the M1 rifle is the greatest battle implement ever devised.” Indeed, the elegance of the walnut stock and the fine balance of the Garand’s design has sent some into fits of lyricism.

An American gun reseller provides one such example: “There will never be again such a rifle, so brimming with the genius of an individual mind, so well-constructed to outlive us all, so sculpted as to ask the hand to caress.”

M1 Garand with en bloc clips Photo by Curiosandrelics CC BY-SA 3.0

Machine Guns

The years before WWII saw the development of two of the deadliest heavy machine guns which would be used during the war. If a person was unfortunate enough to get in the way of either gun it would definitely make an impression.

Possibly one of the most expensive general machine guns was the American M2 Ma Deuce 1945, coming in at a budget-busting $1,560, but few who have used it have quibbled with the price.

A U.S. soldier in Normandy stands guard with the M2HB installed on a dual-purpose mounting.

The design was the brainchild of firearms genius John Browning and went on to be perfected by the engineers at Colt, who delivered a six-foot-long, belt-fed, air-cooled, recoil-operated machine gun with incredible stopping power and an upward range limit of four miles.

MG34

While the German MG34 was relatively inexpensive at $131 in 1942, the quality of the parts required was so high that supply could not keep up with demand from the front for replacements and spare parts.

Despite that, the “Nazi Zipper” was a feared and respected weapon. No one in their right mind wanted to go up against a gun that could spew more than 800 rounds a minute.

German soldiers with an MG 34 in France, 1944 Bundesarchiv, Bild 101I-721-0386-15 / Jesse / CC-BY-SA 3.0

By the end of the war, the MG38 had been replaced by the less expensive MG 40 at $100 apiece. The prices of the German guns, however, come with the caveat that they were produced in large part by unpaid slave labor.

These days, a nice clean example of an MG38 will sell at auction for more than $20,000, while for roughly half that, you can purchase your very own M2 Ma Deuce. It might be worth your while to take a look at that pile of junk in the back of grandpa’s garage–you never know what valuable souvenirs lie beneath the dust.