Lord Monteagle

Lord Monteagle


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William Parker, the son of Edward Parker, 10th Baron Morley, was born in 1575. His mother was the daughter and heiress of William Stanley, 3rd Lord Monteagle.

In 1589 Parker married Elizabeth Tresham, the sister of Francis Tresham. The family owned several properties including Hornby Castle and houses in London and Great Hallingbury, Essex. He also inherited the title, Lord Monteagle from his father-in-law.

Monteagle, a Roman Catholic, was involved with Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, in the failed attempt to remove Elizabeth I from power in 1601. Due to the minor role he played in the rebellion he was not executed and instead was fined £8,000.

In 1605 Robert Catesby devised the Gunpowder Plot, a scheme to kill James and as many Members of Parliament as possible. Catesby planned to make the king's young daughter, Elizabeth, queen. In time, Catesby hoped to arrange Elizabeth's marriage to a Catholic nobleman. Over the next few months Catesby recruited Guy Fawkes, Francis Tresham, Everard Digby, Thomas Percy, Thomas Wintour, Robert Wintour, Thomas Bates, Christopher Wright, and John Wright to join the conspiracy.

Catesby's plan involved blowing up the Houses of Parliament on 5 November. This date was chosen because the king was due to open Parliament on that day. At first the group tried to tunnel under Parliament. This plan changed when a member of the group was able to hire a cellar under the House of Lords. The plotters then filled the cellar with barrels of gunpowder. Guy Fawkes was given the task of creating the explosion.

One of the people involved in the plot was Francis Tresham. He was worried that the explosion would kill his friend and brother-in-law, Lord Monteagle. On 26th October Tresham sent Lord Monteagle a letter warning him not to attend Parliament on 5th November.

Lord Monteagle became suspicious and passed the letter to Robert Cecil, the king's chief minister. Cecil quickly organised a thorough search of the Houses of Parliament. While searching the cellars below the House of Lords they found the gunpowder and Guy Fawkes. He was tortured and he eventually gave the names of his fellow conspirators.

James I was very grateful to Lord Monteagle and gave him an annuity of £500 for life, plus lands worth a further £200 per year. Rumours soon began circulating that the conspiracy was really devised by Monteagle and Robert Cecil. It was claimed that Monteagle arranged for Francis Tresham to be poisoned while being held captive in the Tower of London.

Lord Monteagle used the money to invest in the Virginia, East India and Northwest Passage companies. Monteagle also served as a member of the board of Virginia Company.

William Parker, 4th Lord Monteagle, 11th Baron Morley, died at Great Hallingbury, Essex, on 1st July, 1622.


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BIOGRAPHY

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Name Thomas 1st Baron Monteagle of Brandon Rice
Age (as of 2018) 76 years (age at death)
Profession Scientist
Birth Date February 8, 1790
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Simplified transcript

My lord, out of the love I have for some of your friends, I want to make sure you are safe. Because of this I would advise you to not attend this sitting of parliament because God and man have agreed to punish the wickedness of this time. Do not think this is a joke, go to your estate in the country where you will be safe, because although there is no sign of any problem yet, this parliament will receive a terrible blow, but they will not see who it is that hurts them. This advice should not be ignored as it may do you some good, and it can do you no harm because the danger will have passed as soon as you have burned this letter. I hope God grants you the grace to make good use of it, and that he protects you.


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BIOGRAPHY

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Details
Name Thomas Baron Monteagle of Brandon Rice
Age (as of 2018) 77 years (age at death)
Profession Celebrity
Birth Date May 31, 1849
Birth Place Not Known
Nationality Not Known

Thomas Baron Monteagle of Brandon Rice Net Worth

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Estimated Net Worth in 2019: $100K-$1M (Approx.)

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Thomas Baron Monteagle of Brandon body measurements, Height and Weight are not Known yet but we will update soon.

Family & Relations

Not Much is known about Thomas Baron Monteagle of Brandon family and Relationships. All information about his private life is concealed. We will update you soon.

Facts

  • Thomas Baron Monteagle of Brandon Rice age is 77 years (age at death). as of 2018
  • Thomas Baron Monteagle of Brandon birthday is on May 31, 1849.
  • Zodiac sign: Gemini.

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Gunpowder Plot of 1605

On 26 October 1605, while sitting at supper at Hoxton, he received a letter warning of the gunpowder plot, perhaps written by Sir Francis Tresham. After having caused it to be read aloud by Ward, a gentleman in his service and an intimate friend of Robert Wintour, one of the chief conspirators, he took it to Whitehall and showed it to Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury and other ministers. It is believed by some historians (such as Lady Antonia Fraser), however, that he authored the letter himself in order to win acclaim and favour with the King.


Tag Archives: Lord Mounteagle

On 26 October 1605 William Parker Lord Monteagle (sometimes rendered Mounteagle) was sitting eating dinner with guests at his home in Hoxton, London, when a servant handed him a letter that a tall, mysterious stranger had just delivered to his door. Lord Monteagle broke the seal and then handed the letter back to the servant to read it out. The letter was anonymous, but supposedly from one of the gunpowder plotters, and started as so:

My lord, out of the love I beare to some of youere frends, I have a care of youre preservacion, therefore I would aduyse you as you tender your life to devise some excuse to shift youer attendance at this parliament, for God and man hath concurred to punishe the wickedness of this tyme.

Monteagle was a Catholic member of the House of Lords, a man of divided loyalties – on the one hand to the old religion of England and the severely put upon Catholic community, and on the other hand the protestant English state whose patronage he enjoyed, albeit tentatively. Monteagle reached a decision immediately. He delivered the letter himself into the hands of Robert Cecil Lord Salisbury, who happened to be in a meeting with some other important lords. When the King James returned from his hunting trip three days (!) later, Cecil informed him of the great danger that seemed to be abroad, and James, according to the official version, intuited that an attack was being planned on the state opening of parliament. Thanks to James’s quick-thinking, or, more likely, thanks to Salisbury’s, the great Gunpowder Plot was averted the night before it was meant to be carried out, as Guy Fawkes was accosted in a cellar under the parliament by some barrels of gunpowder, matches in his pocket.

Fawkes was interrogated and executed, his accomplices hunted down and shot, or brought in and executed, and their most audacious, murderous plot against the government and king foiled. The government were, understandably, ruthless in their dealings with the plotters, and the recusancy laws against Catholics were tightened – the plotters did the remaining Catholics of England little favour by their deeds. But there was no general punishment of Catholics in revenge for the plot, no wholesale murder, no Protestant version of ‘The St Bartholomew’s Massacre’. The state distinguished between Catholics loyal to the crown and those not, and this was in no small part thanks to the fact that it had been a loyal Catholic who had helped to foil the plot.

One man who felt particularly thankful to Monteagle was the poet and playwright Ben Jonson. Jonson – like Monteagle – was a Catholic at the time of the plot, and knew some of the main plotters well. He had been drinking and eating with some of the plotters only days before in one of London’s ordinaries. Perhaps, without Monteagle’s intervention, he might not have escaped so easily guilt by association with his co-religionists. In fact, after the plot and the inevitable backlash against Catholics (not as bad as it could have been, but pretty uncomfortable), Jonson turned his back on Catholicism and conformed to the Anglican Church. But he felt grateful enough to Monteagle to pen this epigram…

Lo what my country should have done (have raised
An obelisk, or column to thy name,
Or, if she would but modestly have praised
Thy fact, in brass or marble writ the same)
I, that am glad of thy great chance, here do !
And proud, my works shall out-last common deeds,
Durst think it great, and worthy wonder too,
But thine, for which I do’t, so much exceeds !
My country’s parents I have many known
But, saver of my country, THEE alone.

Since England has not seen fit to leave a memorial of Monteagle’s great act, Jonson is glad to do so, in verse. He brings up the contemporary idea, a well-worn idea in 16th and 17th century poetry, that poetry grants its subject, and its author immortality, only to argue that Monteagle’s act is more immortal still. Even as complimentary epigrams go, this is effusively positive. The last couplet is extremely complimentary ‘THEE alone’, Monteagle alone is the saver of England, next to whom no one can stand. This is the sort of language usually reserved for great military leaders, kings, or even God. But perhaps, knowing what we do about Jonson’s own situation, this is understandable. Jonson is as much thankful to Monteagle for saving his own skin as for saving the country.

Mind, there is more to Monteagle’s story than Jonson acknowledges here. First there is the question of Monteagle’s motivation. One theory is that the letter was written by Monteagle himself, acting alone or in collusion with Salisbury, either to scare the plotters off course, or to flush them out perhaps Salisbury knew something was afoot, but wasn’t quite sure what. The delivery of the letter seems rather staged – Monteagle had the letter read out at the table, and, without pausing to confer with other Catholic lords, took the letter straight to the secretary of state who just happened to be in a meeting with other important people of state. If this was part of a grand eleventh hour ruse to stop the plot, it worked. And, while other Catholic lords struggled to retain their prestige, Monteagle’s career flourished. But perhaps this is churlish to point out given the lives he saved – and whoever said public benefit had to conflict with private gain?

And I was going to finish the post with that question. But then it struck me: What if I had got the poem wrong? All that gushing praise, even by the standards of the time, even in a world of patronage and respect for social betters – wasn’t it actually suspiciously over the top? To claim a column or obelisk should be raised to the man, – who got celebratory obelisks in the 17th century? – to put his act next to the work of the greatest poets, to call him the only saver of the country – ‘Nay, that were a bit much’ as Volpone, Jonson’s greatest comic creation, once said. Jonson was after all a satirist… and he was well-connected too: could he somehow have got wind of what many historians have since suspected, that Monteagle was merely a pawn, albeit a lucky one, in Salisbury’s great web of espionage? Could Jonson have resented his subsequent success, and the plaudits he won through the official story of his role foiling the plot? Is it possible that the epigram is mockery disguised as flattery?

Note: My source for the details of the plot was The Gunpowder Plot, Alan Haynes. The letter itself can be found on the UK National Archives.


Edward, 1er lord Monteagle, STANLEY

  • Married to Anne HARINGTON , born about 1455, deceased in 1489 aged about 34 years old (Parents : John of Hornby HARINGTON †1460 & Maud CLIFFORD ca 1442-1491/ )
  • Married before November 1501 to Elizabeth VAUGHAN , deceased in 1515 (Parents : Thomas of Tretower VAUGHAN & ? ?) with
    • Thomas, 2ème lord Monteagle, STANLEY, baron MonteagleMarried toMary BRANDON †1542 with
    • William, 3ème lord Mounteagle, STANLEY, baron MounteagleMarried toAnne SPENCER †1618
      William, 3ème lord Mounteagle, STANLEY, baron MounteagleMarried toAnne LEYBOURNE with :
    • William CLIFTON
    • Ursula CLIFTON 1567-1627
    • Gervase, lord Clifton, CLIFTON 1570-1618
    • Elizabeth CLIFTON
    • Joan CLIFTON

    Edward Stanley, 1st Baron Monteagle

    Edward Stanley, 1st Baron Monteagle KG (around 1460 - April 6, 1523 ) was an English nobleman and knight of the Order of the Garter .

    Edward Stanley was born the fifth son of Thomas Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby in his marriage to his first wife Eleanor. Edward IV proposed him to the Knight Banneret on July 24, 1482 and he was one of the pallbearers at his funeral in 1483.

    His son also benefited from the rise of his father under Henry VII . In 1484 he was Justice of the Peace for Kent and in the fall of 1485 Edward Stanley became High Sheriff of Lancashire . On October 15, 1485 he was asked for assistance against a Scottish attack and on December 1, 1485 he was given the post of Keeper of New Park in Langley. In 1488/89 the manors of Farleton in Lonsdale , Fareleton in Westmorland and Brierley in Yorkshire are transferred to him. In 1509 he was Justice of the Peace for Westmorland and Yorkshire.

    1511 Edward Stanley served as responsible for patterning (Commissioner of array) in Yorkshire and Westmoreland. In 1513 he took part in the Battle of Flodden Field . His contribution to this battle is controversial, because he was only responsible for the rearguard , yet he is said to have contributed decisively to the English victory. The vernacular attributes him to the killing of the Scottish King James IV . For his contribution to winning the battle, he was made Knight of the Order of the Garter on April 23, 1514 and solemnly inducted into the Order on May 8, 1514.

    On November 23, 1514 he was convened by Writ of Summons in the House of Lords and thus raised to the hereditary Baron Monteagle . In June 1520 he took part in the meeting of the English and French kings on the Field of the Cloth of Gold near Calais .

    Edward Stanley died on April 6, 1523 and was buried in Hornby .


    The plotters

    The lower ground floor vault of the House of Lords where the gunpowder was stored © Their first meeting was on 20 May 1604. Catesby was joined by his friends Thomas Wintour, Jack Wright and Thomas Percy at the Duck and Drake, in the Strand. The fifth person was Guy Fawkes. Originally from York, he had been recruited in Flanders, where he had been serving in the Spanish Army. They discussed their plan to blow up Parliament House, and shortly afterwards leased a small house in the heart of Westminster, installing Fawkes as caretaker, under the alias of John Johnson.

    With Parliament successively postponed to 5 November 1605, over the following year the number of plotters gradually increased to ten. Robert Keyes, Robert Wintour, John Grant and Kit Wright were all relatives, by blood or marriage, to one or more of the original five conspirators. As one of Catesby's servants, Thomas Bates' loyalty was equally firm.

    Fawkes was to light the fuse and escape to continental Europe.

    In March 1605 the group took out a lease on a ground-floor cellar close by the house they had rented from John Whynniard. The cellar lay directly underneath the House of Lords, and over the following months 36 barrels of gunpowder were moved in, enough to blow everything and everyone in the vicinity sky high, if ignited.

    Still hoping for foreign support, Fawkes travelled back to Flanders. Unsuccessful, he was also spotted by English spies. They reported back to Robert Cecil, Earl of Salisbury, James' first minister, and made the link between Fawkes and Catesby.

    Over the next two months Catesby recruited Ambrose Rookwood, as well as Francis Tresham and Sir Everard Digby. Both Rookwood and Digby were wealthy and owned large numbers of horses, essential for the planned uprising. Tresham was Catesby's cousin through marriage, and was brother-in-law to two Catholic peers, Lords Stourton and Monteagle.

    Back in London in October, with only weeks to go, the final details were planned. Fawkes was to light the fuse and escape to continental Europe. To coincide with the explosion, Digby would lead a rising in the Midlands and kidnap King James's daughter, Princess Elizabeth, ready to install her as a puppet queen. In Europe, Fawkes would be arguing the plotters' case to continental governments, to secure their passive acceptance, even support.


    The Gunpowder Plot Conspirators, 1605, by unknown artist. See source website for additional information. This set of images was gathered by User:Dcoetzee from the National Portrait Gallery, London website using a special tool. All images in this batch have an unknown author, but there is strong evidence it was first published before 1923 (based mainly on the NPG’s estimated date of the work). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

    The Gunpowder Plot of 1605, in earlier centuries often called the Gunpowder Treason Plot or the Jesuit Treason, was a failed assassination attempt against King James I of England and VI of Scotland by a group of provincial English Catholics led by Robert Catesby.

    The plan was to blow up the House of Lords during the State Opening of England’s Parliament on 5 November 1605, as the prelude to a popular revolt in the Midlands during which James’s nine-year-old daughter, Princess Elizabeth, was to be installed as the Catholic head of state. Catesby may have embarked on the scheme after hopes of securing greater religious tolerance under King James had faded, leaving many English Catholics disappointed. His fellow plotters were John Wright, Thomas Wintour, Thomas Percy, Guy Fawkes, Robert Keyes, Thomas Bates, Robert Wintour, Christopher Wright, John Grant, Ambrose Rookwood, Sir Everard Digby and Francis Tresham. Fawkes, who had 10 years of military experience fighting in the Spanish Netherlands in suppression of the Dutch Revolt, was given charge of the explosives.

    The plot was revealed to the authorities in an anonymous letter sent to William Parker, 4th Baron Monteagle, on 26 October 1605. During a search of the House of Lords at about midnight on 4 November 1605, Fawkes was discovered guarding 36 barrels of gunpowder—enough to reduce the House of Lords to rubble—and arrested. Most of the conspirators fled from London as they learned of the plot’s discovery, trying to enlist support along the way. Several made a stand against the pursuing Sheriff of Worcester and his men at Holbeche House in the ensuing battle Catesby was one of those shot and killed. At their trial on 27 January 1606, eight of the survivors, including Fawkes, were convicted and sentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered.

    Details of the assassination attempt were allegedly known by the principal Jesuit of England, Father Henry Garnet. Although he was convicted of treasonand sentenced to death, doubt has been cast on how much he really knew of the plot. As its existence was revealed to him through confession, Garnet was prevented from informing the authorities by the absolute confidentiality of the confessional. Although anti-Catholic legislation was introduced soon after the plot’s discovery, many important and loyal Catholics retained high office during King James I’s reign. The thwarting of the Gunpowder Plot was commemorated for many years afterwards by special sermons and other public events such as the ringing of church bells, which have evolved into theBonfire Night of today.

    Early plots

    Gunpowder-plot (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

    In the absence of any sign that James would move to end the persecution of Catholics, as some had hoped for, several members of the clergy (including two anti-Jesuit priests) decided to take matters into their own hands. In what became known as the Bye Plot, the priests William Watson and William Clark planned to kidnap James and hold him in the Tower of London until he agreed to be more tolerant towards Catholics. Cecil received news of the plot from several sources, including the Archpriest George Blackwell, who instructed his priests to have no part in any such schemes. At about the same time, Lord Cobham, Lord Grey de Wilton, Griffin Markham and Walter Ralegh hatched what became known as the Main Plot, which involved removing James and his family and supplanting them with Arbella Stuart. Amongst others, they approached Henry IV of France for funding, but were unsuccessful. All those involved in both plots were arrested in July and tried in autumn 1603 Sir George Brooke was executed, but James, keen not to have too bloody a start to his reign, reprieved Cobham, Grey, and Markham while they were at the scaffold. Ralegh, who had watched while his colleagues sweated, and who was due to be executed a few days later, was also pardoned. Stuart denied any knowledge of the Main Plot. The two priests, condemned by the pope, and “very bloodily handled”, were executed.


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