Coils and Parchments Festival (2nd edition)

Coils and Parchments Festival (2nd edition)

After a successful first edition dedicated to knights, the team of Coils and Scrolls do it again this year, with an even richer and more eclectic program. The screenings will take place at the Parisian cinema Le Desperado, at the Jacques Prévert cinema in Aulnay-sous-Bois and at the Jemmapes space, from November to December. A “medieval Paris by night” ballad will be offered, and the festival will end with a special evening at the La Cantada bar, with a concert and screening of the film “Black Death”.

From Ash to Robin des Bois via Guillaume de Baskerville

This year again, the festival offers a wide variety of films revolving around the Middle Ages, with no barrier between so-called author's films and genre films. It is therefore not surprising to come across the catastrophic "hero" of the "Evil Dead" series, Ash, sent into the world of King Arthur ("Evil Dead III: Army of Darkness", by Sam Raimi), and the Franciscan scholar Guillaume de Baskerville, played by Sean Connery (“The Name of the Rose”, by Jean-Jacques Annaud). The Scottish actor also in the honor of the beautiful film "The Rose and the Arrow" (by Richard Lester), where he plays an aging Robin Hood.

This is just a glimpse of the tantalizing program, featuring John Boorman ("Excalibur") and John Huston ("Walk with Love and Death"), and a debate on medieval series .

Each screening is in fact followed by a debate with specialists, history and cinema.

Middle ages's not dead

In addition to the films and the debates, Bobines et Parchemins is also a night ballad in medieval Paris, a radio show (Radio Goliards on Radio Libertaire), and a promising closing evening. Like last year at the La Cantada bar, we will enjoy a concert by Fugu dal Bronx, which will be followed by the very good "Black Death" (by Christopher Smith), film with Sean Bean, aka Eddard Stark, aka Boromir, and Carice Van Houten, the Mélisandre of "Game of Thrones".

William Blanc presents Coils and Parchments :

- How was the festival born?

The festival was born in 1592 in the Highlands of Scotland ... uh, no, I'll start again. The festival was born from the meeting of students, young and old, and cinema professionals, who aim to cross views on cinema and history, on history in cinema and on cinema making the story. This commitment started from an observation. The general public is more familiar with the Middle Ages portrayed in films (and popular culture in general) than with historians. We should not regret it, but simply try to understand this discrepancy and use it as a pretext to discover this rich and complex era. So when we screen a film, our goal is not to point out historical errors by grumbling, but to put the work in context. One example among many others. Ralph Bakshi's "Wizards of War" (which is a very medieval fantasy cartoon that we will be showing during the festival) cannot be understood without referring to the Vietnam War.

- Who are the festival organizers?

It's very mixed. Both people from the University, but also film pros. This can be seen in the many partners that we have. Métaluna, for example, is a magazine devoted to “bis” cultures, where we talk about music, comics as well as cinema. History and Medieval Images is a popular historical magazine that is increasingly opening up to medievalism, that is to say to the study of the Middle Ages as it is perceived in modern society (including fantasy) . For this, we must thank its editor-in-chief, Frédéric Wittner, who supported us from the start of the festival (yes, since the year 1515). We are also supported by the Laboratoire de Médiévistique Occidentale de Paris (LAMOP), a history lab attached to the University of Paris 1 and the CNRS, as well as by the University of Paris 1. Moreover, a number of historians from this university will speak after each film to animate a debate with the public. Like what, academics do not stay in their ivory tower ...

- What is the spirit of the festival?

At the same time serious without being too serious by discovering the Middle Ages (and the historical method) through popular films (or not). We play films little known to the general public, like "Black Death" or "Walk with love and death" (however by John Huston). But we also and above all want to meet eyes. This is why, in addition to academics, we have invited film professionals to come and debate, such as Jean-Pierre Putters and Rurik Sallé (eminent members of the Métaluna team), so that they compare their point of view with that of historians. .
Similarly, this year, two members of the organizing committee, Léa Hermenault and Yohan Labrousse, have broadened the horizon of the festoche to TV series (and yes, we promise, we will talk about "Game of Thrones") by organizing a debate around this new visual object (well, new in terms of popularity, eh). Similarly, on the advice of Rurik Sallé, we are going to show a samurai film ("Hara Kiri", 1962 version), in order to show the differences between Japanese and Western Middle Ages, between Japanese cinema and European cinema. And then, there will also be a night stroll, a film concert, while waiting, next year, who knows, exhibitions of artists.

All the program in detail on the site Bobines et Parchemins. Our website, partner of the festival, will relay each screening on its Facebook page.


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