Bloomington Hospital

Bloomington Hospital


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Bloomington Hospital, a health care provider in Bloomington, Indiana, is known for delivering excellence in high-quality, cost-effective healthcare services to the residents of nine counties in south central Indiana. It is committed to provide full continuum of services through innovation, technology and collaborative partnerships.Opening in November 1905, Bloomington Hospital is a cluster of excellent facilities including the Olcott Center for Cancer Education, Center for Women & Children, Outpatient Service Area, and the Center for Occupational Health. The hospital stands to the forefront in its cancer, cardiovascular, diabetics, and psychiatric care.The Hospice of Bloomington Hospital, established in 1979, is the only non-profit hospice in Monroe County fulfilling the physical, emotional, and spiritual needs of patients. It helps people to remain at home with their loved ones during the last phase of illness.Further, a number of programs and clinics are offered through the hospital’s Community Health Services. Outstanding long-term care facilities are available.The Medical Transport Service provides assistance in traveling to and from the hospital. In addition, the hospital operates Promptcare Clinics at two convenient locations in Bloomington - 3443 West Third and 326 South Woodcrest.Special programs and activities are organized for the wellness of the senior citizens. Interpreter services are available for non-English speaking patients.Facilities such as the information desk, cafeteria, chapel, spacious waiting areas, and gift shop are included for visitor’s convenience.


Hospitals

Accidents Happen all the time, do you know who to call or where to go when they do? OSF St. Joseph and BroMenn Medical Centers in Bloomington-Normal are here for you when those unexpected moments happen. How do you choose the right hospital for you? Sometimes time does not afford you that luxary, you go to whichever one is closest. Other times, you do have the time to find a hospital that will best fit your needs. This page will discuss the similarities and differences between St. Joseph and BroMenn Medical Center along with the services they provide, so you can find the best fit for you and your family.


IU Health Bloomington Hospital Set To Begin Demolition And Move To New Site Next Year

Bloomington Hospital will move to its new site on the East Side in late 2021. Then, demolition of its old site in downtown Bloomington will begin.

IU Health first announced plans to move from the current site six years ago. The City of Bloomington bought the land and started planning for redevelopment of the area– A master plan for development was published this month.

Deputy Mayor Mick Renneisen says IU Health is responsible for demolition of the hospital building itself, and the city will take a phased approach to demolishing smaller, additional buildings later on. 

“So, that’ll be done over time and yes there will be disruption," he says. "But we’ll try to minimize as best we can- knowing IU Health has that responsibility for the biggest phase, which would be sometime next year.”

Renneisen adds IU Health has required that the hospital building be demolished. 

He says this means IU Health will be responsible for ensuring minimal negative impact on surrounding neighborhoods during the demolition.


IU Health's creation dates to January 1, 1997 when three Indianapolis hospitals—Methodist Hospital, Riley Hospital for Children and Indiana University Hospital – merged to form Clarian Health Partners. [4] Based in Indianapolis, the hospital system soon grew to include other hospitals and health centers across the state.

In January 2011, Clarian Health adopted the new name of Indiana University Health. The new brand did not change the corporate structure. IU Health remained an independent, nonprofit health system with for-profit entities, with the Methodist Church and Indiana University Board of Trustees as corporate board members. [5]

The system's flagship hospital, IU Health Methodist (originally called Methodist Episcopal Hospital and Deaconess Home), opened in 1908 on the site of a former baseball park. [6] Two years later the hospital's affiliation with the Indianapolis Motor Speedway began when the city's first motorized ambulance began bringing patients to Methodist from the racetrack. Methodist expanded over the decades and was the site of numerous medical firsts, including the nation's first heart transplant at a private hospital (1982) and Indiana's first double-lung transplant (1995). [7]

Riley Hospital for Children became Indiana's first children's hospital when it opened in 1924, named after Hoosier poet James Whitcomb Riley. [8] The 300-room hospital provides care to more than 300,000 children a year. [9] Nearby Indiana University Hospital opened in 1970 as a teaching hospital affiliated with Indiana University School of Medicine, replacing Long Hospital that had been in operation since 1914. [4]

IU Health's LifeLine helicopter is the oldest air ambulance in Indiana it began flying in 1979. [10] The IU Health-owned People Mover train, which is open to the public, began running in 2003 on a 1.4-mile dual track that runs above city streets and crosses underneath Interstate 65. The People Mover ceased operation in February 2019 and was replaced by an extensive shuttle bus system that offers transport between the three (3) downtown hospitals. [11]

The health system launched a major expansion into Indianapolis’ suburbs in 2005 with the opening of IU Health North and IU Health West hospitals. [12] [13]

In 2008, the health system moved its administrative offices into Fairbanks Hall, a six-story office and clinical studies building constructed along the Indiana Central Canal. [14] Another significant expansion came in 2012 when IU Health opened a $100 million neuroscience building near Methodist Hospital. [15]

In more recent years, IU Health has expanded outpatient services while reducing its hospital holdings. In 2015 it converted IU Health Morgan hospital into an outpatient facility and sold its majority interest in IU Health LaPorte and Starke hospitals in northern Indiana. [16] At the same time, IU Health added physicians’ offices and opened multiple urgent care centers. It also operates insurance plans for employers, families and individuals, including the Medicare-eligible. [17]

In 2016, IU Health announced it would move women's services including maternity care from its Methodist campus to Riley Hospital for Children. [18]

The same year brought the retirement of Daniel F. Evans Jr., who served 14 years as IU Health's second CEO, was a key architect of its creation and growth, and was the fifth generation of his family to serve at IU Health Methodist Hospital. [19] He was replaced by Dennis M. Murphy, a hospital administrator from Chicago who had been groomed as Evans' successor.

Indiana University Health has a 14-member board responsible for making sure the health system carries out its mission and approving its budget, long-range plans, medical staff appointments, new services and major policies.

IU Health's executive leadership includes: [20]

  • Dennis Murphy, president and chief executive officer: Murphy joined IU Health in 2013 as chief operating officer and was named president in September 2015. On May 1, 2016 he succeeded Daniel F. Evans Jr. as CEO upon Evans' retirement.
  • Jonathan Gottlieb, MD, executive vice president & chief medical officer: Gottlieb joined IU Health in October 2014. He is board certified in internal medicine, pulmonary medicine and critical care medicine.
  • Michelle Janney, PhD, RN, executive vice president & chief operating officer: Janney joined IU Health in 2015.

University Health System Consortium Edit

For four consecutive years, IU Health Methodist Hospital has been recognized as one of the nation's best academic medical centers by the University HealthSystem Consortium. [21] Of 98 academic medical centers included in the analysis, IU Health Methodist Hospital is one of five to earn the Quality Leadership Award. Academic Medical Centers were assessed across a broad spectrum of care including safety, timeliness, effectiveness, efficiency, equity and patient-centeredness.

Magnet designation Edit

Arnett Hospital as well as Arnett Ambulatory sites, West Hospital, Bloomington Hospital, Methodist Hospital, University Hospital, and Riley Hospital for Children have been designated as Magnet hospital systems by the American Nurses Credentialing Center in recognition of excellence in nursing care. [22]

Indiana University Health hospitals include:

    (Lafayette)
  • Indiana University Health Arnett Hospital Hospice (Lafayette) (Muncie)
  • Indiana University Health Bedford Hospital (Bedford)
  • Indiana University Health Blackford Hospital (Hartford City)
  • Indiana University Health Bloomington Hospital (Bloomington)
  • Indiana University Health Frankfort Hospital (Frankfort)
  • Indiana University Health Jay Hospital (Portland) (Indianapolis) (Carmel)
  • Indiana University Health Paoli Hospital (Paoli)
  • Indiana University Health Saxony Hospital (Fishers)
  • Indiana University Health Tipton Hospital (Tipton)
  • Indiana University Health West Hospital (Avon)
  • Indiana University Health White Memorial Hospital (Monticello) (Indianapolis)
  • Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health North Hospital (Carmel)

IU Health has two of the Level I Trauma Centers in the state of Indiana [23] - IU Health Methodist Hospital (adult) and Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health (pediatric). IU Health's Trauma Centers include multidisciplinary teams of board-certified physicians, nurses and technicians available onsite to treat the most severely injured patients at all times. IU Health Arnett Hospital became Indiana's first level 3 verified trauma center in April 2013. [24]


History

It’s a story of broad-minded thinkers and impressive feats. Outstanding artistic contributions and world-altering inventions. Strong leaders and brave community-builders. These milestones represent the amazing life of our flagship Bloomington campus.

A pioneer in education

Herman B Wells (1902�), Indiana University’s long-standing president (1938�) and chancellor (1962�), is credited with elevating the university’s stature in research, the arts, and international studies. One of the great leaders in higher education, Wells devoted his life to IU. Advancing the rights of African American students, supporting groundbreaking research from the Kinsey Institute, protecting our campus green spaces, and establishing the Lilly Library are among his lasting achievements.

1820–1840

1820: A legislative act is adopted establishing a state seminary. Indiana University Founders Day.

1822: Construction begins on Seminary Building.

1823: Baynard Rush Hall is hired as the first professor.

1825: Classes begin with an enrollment of 10 male students.

1828: “State Seminary” becomes “Indiana College.”

1829: Andrew Wylie becomes the first IU president.

1830: The first class graduates.

1838: “Indiana College” becomes “Indiana University.”

The first IU African American graduates

The IU Neal-Marshall Black Culture Center is named in honor of IU’s first male and first female African American graduates, Marcellus Neal and Frances Marshall. At a time when it was rare for an African American man to go to college—and even rarer for an African American woman—Neal and Marshall were undaunted in their pursuit of an education. Neal graduated in 1895 with an A.B. in mathematics, and Marshall graduated in 1919 with an A.B. in English. Both went on to serve in respected careers as teachers and school administrators.

1841–1880

1842: The School of Law is established (now the IU Maurer School of Law).

1852: Alfred Ryors becomes the second IU president.

1853: William Mitchell Daily becomes the third IU president.

1854: The IU Alumni Association is founded.

1859: Theophilus A. Wylie serves six months as acting IU president. John Hiram Lathrop becomes the fourth IU president.

1860: Cyrus Nutt becomes the fifth IU president.

1867: IU becomes one of the first state universities to admit women. The Indiana Student (now the Indiana Daily Student) publishes its first issue.

1869: Sarah Parke Morrison becomes the first woman to graduate.

1875: Lemuel Moss becomes the sixth IU president.

Hail to Old IU!

Listen to the Indiana University Band play our official alma mater song, “Hail to Old I.U.”—which was first performed in 1893. J. T. Giles, who organized the IU glee club, wrote the lyrics: Come and join in song together, Shout with might and main. Our beloved alma mater, Sound her praise again. Gloriana frangipana, E’er to her be true. She’s the pride of Indiana, Hail to old I.U.!

Announcer speaks: Ladies and gentlemen, please join in singing one of the great college songs of all time: “Hail to Old I.U.” It will be conducted by Ray E. Cramer, director of bands at Indiana University.

[crowd applauds and cheers]

1881–1900

1883: Charles Henry Gilbert becomes the first Ph.D. graduate.

1884: Elisha Ballantine is named acting IU president.

1885: David Starr Jordan becomes the seventh IU president.

1886: The IU men’s football team is founded.

1888: With the purchase of a chronoscope, future IU president William Lowe Bryan founds the oldest continuing psychology laboratory in the United States.

1891: John Merle Coulter becomes the eighth IU president.

1892: IU wins the Intercollegiate Baseball Championship series against DePauw University. The Arbutus campus yearbook is published for the first time.

1893: Joseph Swain becomes the ninth IU president. “Hail to Old I.U.,” IU’s official alma mater, is performed by the IU glee club for the first time.

1895: Marcellus Neal becomes IU’s first black graduate, with an A.B. in mathematics.

1896: The IU men’s basketball team is founded.

Prized journalist

IU journalism student Ernie Pyle won the Pulitzer Prize for Correspondence in 1944 for his extraordinary work as a World War II correspondent. His writings illustrated the everyday struggles of ordinary soldiers, whom he traveled with on front lines in North Africa, Sicily, Italy, and France. Pyle was published in more than 400 daily newspapers nationwide. His columns were popular because they put a face on a dehumanizing war. Pyle died in 1945 by sniper fire on the island of Ie Shima.

1901–1920

1902: William Lowe Bryan becomes the 10th IU president.

1903: The School of Medicine is established.

1904: The Graduate School is established.

1908: The School of Education is established. IU hosts “Gala Week”—the first homecoming event for alumni—which includes a circus and a banquet.

1912: “Indiana, Our Indiana”—the most popular IU fight song—is first performed by the IU Band in a football game against Northwestern University.

1914: The School for Nurses is established (now the School of Nursing).

1919: Frances Marshall becomes IU’s first black female graduate, with an A.B. in English.

1920: The School of Commerce and Finance is established (now the IU Kelley School of Business).

An invention worth smiling about

IU dental scientist Joseph Muhler, IU chemist William Nebergall, and head of the IU chemistry department Harry Day filed a patent for a toothpaste that used stannous fluoride and a calcium pyrophosphate abrasive—the formulation that Procter & Gamble soon named Crest, which revolutionized dental care. Crest was first sold nationally in 1956.

1921–1940

1921: The School of Music is established (now the IU Jacobs School of Music).

1925: The stadium is dedicated and the “Old Oaken Bucket” makes its first appearance during the IU-Purdue football game.

1929: IU alumnus and composer Hoagy Carmichael publishes “Stardust” at the age of 30.

1931: Professor Rolla N. Harger invents the Drunk-O-Meter—the first successful machine for testing human blood-alcohol content.

1932: Coach Billy Thorn leads the wrestling team to the NCAA championship, the first NCAA team title for IU Athletics.

1936: The IU Foundation is established.

1937: Herman B Wells is named acting IU president.

1938: Herman B Wells becomes the 11th IU president. The IU men’s cross country team wins the NCAA championship.

1940: The IU men’s basketball and cross country teams win NCAA championships.

Banner years

1940. 1953. 1976. 1981. 1987. The IU Hoosiers men’s basketball team has won five NCAA Championships, tying IU for third place in total championship banners—which hang in our beloved Assembly Hall. Many consider IU’s 1976 team to be the best ever in the history of college basketball. The team is still the last undefeated NCAA men’s basketball champion.

1941–1960

1941: The IU Auditorium is completed. The IU Art Museum is established. One of the world’s first cyclotrons becomes operational at IU.

1942: The IU men’s cross country team wins the NCAA championship.

1944: IU bestows its first honorary doctorate on former student Ernie Pyle, who won the Pulitzer Prize for Correspondence that year.

1945: IU wins the Big Ten football championship.

1946: IU zoologist Hermann J. Muller wins the Nobel Prize. The School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation is established (now the School of Public Health-Bloomington).

1947: IU Professor Alfred Kinsey and his colleagues establish the Institute for Sex Research (now the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction).

1948: IU Professor Alfred Kinsey and his co-researchers publish Sexual Behavior in the Human Male, which becomes a national bestseller. America’s first degree-granting folklore program is initiated.

1950: Indiana University Press is established.

1951: IU holds the first Little 500 bicycle race.

1953: IU professor Alfred Kinsey and his co-researchers publish Sexual Behavior in the Human Female. The IU men’s basketball team wins the NCAA championship.

1956: Crest toothpaste, using a formula developed by three IU researchers, is first sold nationally.

1960: The Seventeenth Street Football Stadium (now the Indiana Memorial Stadium) is completed.

An Oscar for Breaking Away

IU alumnus Steve Tesich won the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay in 1979 for the movie Breaking Away, the story of four Bloomington townies—called “cutters” after the local limestone cutting trade—who enter the famous IU Little 500 bicycle race. To this day, IU student teams race under the name Cutters to honor the film’s legacy.

1961–1970

1961: The IU men’s swimming team wins the first of 20 consecutive Big Ten championships.

1962: Elvis Jacob Stahr Jr. becomes the 12th IU president. Herman B Wells is named university chancellor. IU alumnus James Watson wins the Nobel Prize, as he and two others are honored for discovering the structure of DNA.

1968: Herman B Wells serves as interim IU president. Joseph Lee Sutton becomes the 13th IU president. The IU men’s swimming team wins the NCAA championship.

1969: John W. Snyder is named acting chancellor through July. Byrum E. Carter becomes chancellor in August. The Third Library Building (now the Herman B Wells Library) is completed. The IU men’s swimming team wins the NCAA championship.

1970: IU celebrates its sesquicentennial. The IU men’s swimming team wins the NCAA championship.

1971–1980

1971: John W. Ryan becomes the 14th IU president. Assembly Hall and the Musical Arts Center are completed. The IU men’s swimming team wins the NCAA championship.

1972: The School of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA) is established. The IU men’s swimming team wins the NCAA championship. Team member Mark Spitz goes on to win seven gold medals at the Olympics. Coach Doc Counsilman leads both teams.

1973: The Black Culture Center (Neal-Marshall) and the Latino Cultural Center (La Casa) are established. The IU men’s swimming team wins the NCAA championship.

1976: The IU men’s basketball team wins the NCAA championship.

1979: Alumnus Steve Tesich wins an Oscar for his screenplay for the movie Breaking Away about the IU Little 500 race. The movie was filmed on campus.

1980: Kenneth R. R. Gros Louis becomes vice president for academic affairs and Bloomington chancellor.

Welcome to IU

Funded by Edson Sample, the IU Sample Gates were dedicated in 1987, serving as a welcoming entrance to the oldest part of the current IU campus known as the Old Crescent. They are made with Indiana limestone and are the most-photographed IU structure. Before the gates were built, Kirkwood Avenue extended into campus.

1981–2000

1981: School of Music students present the first performance by a university company at the Metropolitan Opera House. Architect I. M. Pei completes the IU Art Museum. The IU men’s basketball team wins the NCAA championship.

1982: Composer and conductor Leonard Bernstein is in residence as the first fellow of the Institute for Advanced Study. The IU women’s tennis team wins the AIAW championship. The IU men’s soccer team wins the NCAA championship.

1983: The IU men’s soccer team wins the NCAA championship

1987: Thomas Ehrlich becomes the 15th IU president. The Sample Gates are dedicated. The IU men’s basketball team wins the NCAA championship.

1988: The IU men’s soccer team wins the NCAA championship.

1991: The first IU Dance Marathon is held.

1994: Myles Brand becomes the 16th IU president. The School of Music graduate program ties for first place with Juilliard and Eastman in the U.S. News & World Report rankings. Professor of English Yusef Komunyakaa wins the Pulitzer Prize for poetry. The IU softball team wins the Big Ten championship.

1998: The Asian Culture Center is established. The IU men’s soccer team wins the NCAA championship.

1999: University Chancellor Herman B Wells is named IU’s Man of the Century. The IU men’s soccer team wins the NCAA championship.

2000: The School of Informatics is founded and is the first school of its kind in the nation. University Chancellor Herman B Wells dies at 97. The Herman B Wells plaza is dedicated.

Challenging conventional wisdom

For her analysis of economic governance, Professor Elinor Ostrom (1993�) won the Nobel Prize in 2009. Ostrom, a political theorist, defied traditional understanding by showing how local property can be successfully managed by local commons without privatization or governance by central authorities. She was the first woman to win in the category of Economic Sciences.

2001–2010

2001: Sharon Stephens Brehm becomes chancellor. Kenneth R. R. Gros Louis is named chancellor emeritus. IU is named Time magazine’s College of the Year.

2002: Gerald Bepko is named interim IU president after Myles Brand steps down to become the head of the NCAA. The Neal-Marshall Black Culture Center is dedicated. The inaugural powwow is held by IU First Nations.

2003: Adam W. Herbert becomes the 17th IU president. Kenneth R. R. Gros Louis is appointed interim chancellor. Coach Jerry Yeagley leads the IU men’s soccer team to a sixth NCAA championship in his final season.

2004: Intel names IU the no. 1 wireless college campus. The Lilly Endowment Inc. gives IU $53 million for life sciences research. The IU men’s soccer team wins the NCAA championship under new head coach Mike Freitag.

2005: IU is named the Hottest Big State School by Newsweek, America’s Hot Colleges.

2006: IU’s supercomputer system “Big Red” is ranked the fastest supercomputer owned and operated by a U.S. university and the 23rd fastest supercomputer in the world. IU is named the “most wired” public university by PC Magazine.

2007: Michael A. McRobbie becomes the 18th IU president. Karen Hanson is named IU executive vice president and Bloomington provost.

2009: IU Professor of Political Science Elinor Ostrom (1933�) is awarded the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences.

2010: IU moves into the top 30 colleges in Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine’s rankings of the � Best Values in Public Colleges.” IU Bloomington libraries are named #1 in the country by the Association of College and Research Libraries. A new microscope at IU breaks the light microscopy resolution barrier.

2011–2020

2011: The IU Cinema is dedicated. The 9/11 Commission reconvenes on campus.

2012: IU is named 17th in the nation in total voluntary support rankings by the Council for Aid to Education. Lauren Robel is named provost and executive vice president. The IU trustees approve a new School of Global and International Studies in the College of Arts and Sciences. The IU trustees approve the merger of the School of Informatics and the School of Library and Information Science. The IU men’s soccer team wins the NCAA championship.

2013: Former U.S. Sen. Richard Lugar and former U.S. Rep. Lee Hamilton are named distinguished scholars and professors of practice in the School of Global and International Studies. The IU men’s baseball team makes its first trip to the College World Series.

2014: The Media School at Indiana University is established, which combines the 100-year-old journalism program, the telecommunications department, and portions of the communication and culture department. The IU trustees approve the Indiana University Bicentennial Strategic Plan.

2015: The IU trustees approve a proposal to establish a new engineering program that will be initially housed in the IU School of Informatics. IU, IU Health, and IU Health Bloomington Hospital announce plans to create a regional academic health campus at IU Bloomington, which will include a new home for the IU Health Bloomington Hospital. The National Jurist names IU Maurer School of Law Professor William Henderson the most influential person in legal education. Three IU Jacobs School of Music alumni take home Grammy statuettes—double-bassist Edgar Meyer, pianist Cory Smythe, and early-music tenor Aaron Sheehan.

2016: Ground is broken for SPEA’s O’Neill Graduate Center. The Hutton Honors College celebrates its 50th anniversary. The first IU Day—a 24-hour worldwide celebration of all things IU—is held on April 12. The IU Auditorium celebrates its 75th anniversary. The IU Art Museum becomes the IU Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art. Lori Reesor is named dean of students. The first program is selected for the Grand Challenges initiative. The School of Art and Design opens. IU’s first engineering program launches. Olympians with ties to IU bring home five gold, one silver, and two bronze medals.

2017: Herman B Wells’ 23 reels of personal home movies were digitized and made available online. The IU Sidney and Lois Eskenazi Museum of Art closed to begin a two-year, $30 million renovation. Goodbody Hall and Wells Quadrangle became student housing for the first time in almost 90 years. A new Master of Architecture degree program, set to begin in fall 2018, was announced. The Conrad Prebys Amphitheater was dedicated. IU Health and IU revealed the design of the planned Regional Academic Health Center. The School of Informatics and Computing became the School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering. The School of Art and Design became the School of Art, Architecture, and Design. The Arthur Metz Carillon played its final notes prior to a planned renovation and move to the Arboretum. Chancellor Emeritus Ken Gros Louis passed away at age 80. Actor Glenn Close donated her costume collection to the School of Art, Architecture, and Design.

2018: IU Provost Professor Lisa Pratt was named the planetary protection officer at NASA. Ballantine Hall renovation began. Found footage of the 1954 high school basketball games that inspired the movie Hoosiers was preserved in the IU Libraries Moving Image Archive. The WFIU program A Moment of Science celebrated its 30th anniversary. The Center for Rural Engagement was launched. Former Chancellor Sharon Brehm passed away. Luddy Hall was dedicated. Dave O’Guinn was named vice provost for student affairs and dean of students. IU’s Mexico Gateway opened in Mexico City. IU amended its non-discrimination policy to include protections for genetic information and gender expression. The Russian Language Flagship program was established, making IU Bloomington the only institution in the United States with four language flagship programs. The Precision Health Initiative, part of IU’s Grand Challenges, led to a new cancer treatment. The IU School of Global and International Studies was named for Lee Hamilton and Richard Lugar. IU football legend George Taliaferro passed away at age 91. Reuters ranked IU the 54th most innovative university in the world.


Carle’s Beginning

Based in Urbana, IL, Carle Health is vertically integrated with more than 11,000 employees in its hospitals, a multi-specialty physician group, health plans and associated healthcare businesses including the Carle Illinois College of Medicine, the world&rsquos first engineering-based medical school. Carle is proud to be named a Great Place to Work®. Carle Foundation Hospital ranks as one of America&rsquos 50 Best Hospitals by Healthgrades and for more than 10 years has held Magnet® designation, the nation&rsquos highest honor for nursing care. The 453-bed Carle Foundation Hospital is a Level I Trauma Center and offers Level III perinatal services, Carle BroMenn Medical Center with 221 beds in Bloomington-Normal and nearby 25-bed critical access Eureka Hospital, the 104-bed Carle Richland Memorial Hospital the 24-bed critical access Carle Hoopeston Regional Health Center and a multi-specialty physician group with more than 1,000 doctors and advanced practice providers.

Our History

1918 – Carle Hospital Founding Gift
The history of Carle began in 1918, when Margaret Burt Carle Morris left $40,000 to the city of Urbana to start a hospital. This led to the creation of The Urbana Memorial Hospital Association. Her name, Carle, is an enduring testimony to the roots of the organization. In 1931, J.C. Thomas Rogers and Hugh L. Davison, two doctors from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, moved to Urbana and opened Carle Memorial Hospital and the Rogers-Davison Clinic. Housed in the abandoned Eastern Illinois Medical Sanitarium, the clinic and 15-bed hospital introduced the concept of multi-specialty group practice to the area.

1989 – CarleCare HMO Becomes Health Alliance™
Health Alliancebegan serving members in east Central Illinois in 1980, under the name CarleCare HMO. In 1989, the name was changed to Health Alliance Medical Plans, and it was reorganized as a for-profit insurance company owned by Carle Clinic.

2010 – Carle Foundation Hospital Merges with the former Carle Clinic
Though separated into two organizations in 1946, the clinic and hospital reunited on April 1, 2010. Together known as Carle, Carle Foundation Hospital and Carle Physician Group continue to provide high-quality healthcare and advancements in medical research. This vertical integration means we’ll improve the health of the people we serve for generations to come.

2011 – Carle Develops Rural Alliance
Rural Alliance was created to help rural providers collaborate together with Carle Health to ensure rural populations have consistent access to exceptional care and experiences.

Did you know ?

For nearly a century, Carle Foundation Hospital and Carle Physician Group have shared a vision for providing high-quality health care.

2012 – Carle Hoopeston Regional Health Center (CHRHC) Joins the System
CHRHC, previously known as Hoopeston Memorial Community Hospital, opened in 1952 and added a 25 bed long-term nursing facility in the 1970s. In 2001, the first of many major renovations took place, with adding a 25 apartment independent living facility, upgrading many departments and adding a 10,000 square foot clinic. In 2011, the board of directors announced they would integrate with Carle Foundation Hospital. In July 2012, a multi-million dollar surgical suite and emergency department renovation was completed, including four new state-of-the-art inpatient rooms. On November 1, 2012, the integration became official and the hospital was renamed Carle Hoopeston Regional Health Center. CHRHC now consists of one critical access hospital with 24 beds and eight clinical locations.

2015 – Carle Illinois College of Medicine is Founded
As the world's first engineering-based college of medicine, Carle Illinois College of Medicine leverages advanced technology to train doctor-innovators in delivering better, more compassionate and accessible care to patients worldwide.

2016 – Carle Richland Memorial Hospital (CRMH) Joins the System
Successor to the Olney Sanitarium, Richland Memorial Hospital opened its doors on July 16, 1953. It began its relationship with Carle Foundation Hospital in 2014 as a clinical affiliate. In 2016, Carle and Richland Memorial began exploring full integration to increase access to healthcare services and providers in southeastern Illinois. The board of directors of both voted unanimously to approve the integration, which became official on April 1, 2017. The facility is now known as Carle Richland Memorial Hospital. Administration, management and operations remain local with resources and oversight provided by Carle, to remain aligned in our mission and vision. In 2018 a formal agreement was made to provide air ambulance services to the entire county.

2020 – Carle BroMenn Medical Center (CBMC) and Carle Eureka Hospital Join the System
With its roots established in the late 1800s and early 1900s, BroMenn Healthcare was officially started in 1984 as a combination of Brokaw Hospital, Eureka Community Hospital and Mennonite Hospital. In 1995, BroMenn Medical Group was developed, consisting of primary care medical clinics in five communities and some specialty practices.From 2010-2020, the BroMenn system joined the Downers Grove, IL-based Advocate Health Care during which time BroMenn Regional Medical Center became Advocate BroMenn Medical Center and Eureka Community Hospital was renamed Advocate Eureka Hospital.In 2020, all related facilities in Bloomington, Eureka and Normal, IL and in regional areas joined Carle Health. This includes both the hospitals, now known as Carle BroMenn Medical Center and Carle Eureka Hospital, The Center for Outpatient Medicine (Ambulatory Surgery Center) and the Comfort and Care Suites (the Recovery Care Center).

2020 – FirstCarolinaCare and FirstMedicare Direct
Health Alliance provides administrative services for its affiliate, FirstCarolinaCare Insurance Company in Pinehurst, North Carolina.


Bloomington Hospital - History

Add wikidata tags to hospitals in Indiana.

addr:city Bloomington
addr:housenumber 601
addr:postcode 47402
addr:state IN
addr:street West 2nd Street
amenity hospital
building yes
emergency yes
healthcare hospital
healthcare:emergency yes
name IU Health Bloomington Hospital
phone 812-353-6821
website http://www.bloomingtonhospital.org
wikidata Q87932480

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Версия #3

addr:city Bloomington
addr:housenumber 601
addr:postcode 47402
addr:state IN
addr:street West 2nd Street
amenity hospital
building yes
emergency yes
healthcare hospital
healthcare:emergency yes
name IU Health Bloomington Hospital
phone 812-353-6821
website http://www.bloomingtonhospital.org

Точки

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  • 1209913425

Версия #2

Точки

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  • 1209913344
  • 1209913376
  • 1209913425

Версия #1

Точки

  • 1209913425
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  • 1209913379
  • 1209913385
  • 1209913387
  • 1209913406
  • 1209913404
  • 1209913362
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  • 1209913376
  • 1209913425

Bloomington Hospital - History

This post is written by local historian Jim Mackin based on his presentation for the Bloomingdale Neighborhood History group on November 16, 2015. The topic covers two of our themes: the medical history of the Bloomingdale neighborhood, and another building that (almost) is no longer in existence.

Jim Mackin is a member of the BNHG’s Planning Committee, presenting popular presentations on behalf of the group, as well as leading monthly neighborhood history walking tours.

It all began in 1769. Two students were graduating with medical degrees from King’s College. Twenty-eight-year old Dr. Samuel Bard gave the commencement speech that so moved city leaders that enough funds were pledged to establish a hospital. In 1776, New York Hospital became the 3rd oldest hospital when it opened just in time to treat some rag-tag colonials wounded by shot from British men-of-war ships moving up the Hudson.

Mentally ill patients were treated from the very beginning of the hospital along with all other patients. But the number of mentally ill patients was rising greatly. In 1802 a committee was formed to consider an addition to the building, and any other planning, to accommodate the increase of what were the called “lunatics.” But more radical action was taken by the establishment of a separate and new department in the hospital to accommodate mentally ill patients, and the construction of a separate and new asylum building in 1808. This asylum of 80 beds was the only one of its kind in New York State.

New approaches to treatment of the mentally ill by Dr. Pinel in Paris and William Tuke who established the Retreat for the Insane in York, England. Patients were to be no longer kept in seclusion, let alone in chains. Treatment was becoming understood as “moral” instead of “medical”. The changes had sweeping implications: patients were “visited” and physical activity for patients was encouraged.

A committee consisting of Thomas Eddy, John R Murray, John Aspinwall, Thomas Buckley, Cadwallader Colden, and Peter A Jay decided on a site in Bloomingdale for a new and separate institution for the treatment of the mentally ill. They purchased land from Gerald DePeyster on what is now where Columbia University resides in Morningside Heights. The cornerstone for the Bloomingdale Insane Asylum was laid on May 7th, 1818, and the building was officially opened on June 1st, 1821. This is how it appeared on the early Randel Farm Maps (1818-1820):

Randal Farm Map of 1818-1820 showing The Bloomingdale Insane Asylum

The building was made mostly of limestone and was 60 ft. wide and 211 ft. long. That would make it as long as say from 103rd to 104th St. By 1824, there were 120 patients.

In 1829, a building was erected 117 ft. northwest of the main building to house noisy and violent men. The building was made of brick, 57 by 32 ft., 3 stories high, with 33 rooms, and iron bars on the windows. A similar building for noisy and violent female patients was erected in 1837. Here is an image of how the Asylum looked in 1834:

Bloomingdale Insane Asylum in 1834

In 1834 when there were 134 patients, 38 acres southeast of the grounds were sold (for $24,755) to the Leake and Watts Orphan Asylum. In 1839, “pauper patients” in the Bloomingdale Asylum were moved to the new Lunatic Asylum that was opened by the City on Blackwell’s Island, today called Roosevelt Island. A Superintendent and a Matron administered the Asylum. The Asylum also had a resident physician from the beginning in 1821. By 1848, and for $75 a year, Croton Water came to the Bloomingdale Insane Asylum.

In 1843, Dorothea Dix visited the Bloomingdale Insane Asylum. In 1851, she visited the BIA again, this time rendering her comments to the Board of Governors. From this, some $52,000 was raised to build two additions to the facilities that separately housed the noisy and violent men and women. They were each two stories high and 100 ft long and housed about 150 patients. In 1862, additional funds expanded the asylum further and connected the buildings into a wing-type design. In response to a point made by Miss Dix about a noisy engine and laundry, a separate 3-story building, 75 ft. by 40 ft., was built for laundry and as a residence for domestics. In 1875, pumping water from wells was ended with a direct connection to the Croton water supply that ran down present Amsterdam Avenue. Also in 1875, a conservatory of brick, wood, and glass, containing a plant house, aviary and aquarium was erected.

On September 16, 1876, as many as 10,000 people were estimated to have congregated to Bloomingdale Heights to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Harlem Heights.

In 1880, the BIA site was given consideration, along with another site in Inwood and another site at Port Morris in the Bronx, for the 1883 World’s Fair Exhibition that would celebrate the 100th anniversary of the end of the Revolutionary War (Treaty of Paris). Here is an image of the proposed plan:

Plan for the 1883 World’s Fair site in Morningside Heights

In 1880, the $130,000 John C. Green Memorial Building for female patients was opened with a donation from his widow. John C. Green made his fortune in the China trade, and he gave much of it to Princeton University and the Bloomingdale Insane Asylum. The Green building was attached to the main building on the west side. When Columbia University moved to the site in 1897, this building was renovated and used by Columbia as “College Hall.” Here is a photograph of the Green Building whose architect was Ralph Townsend:

John C. Green Memorial Building circa 1890

Ralph Townsend was also the architect of the Macy Villa that survives to this day.

Columbia University has used the Macy Villa in various capacities with the names of Buell Hall, and Maison Francaise. Trustee and donor, William H. Macy, funded it for use by wealthy male patients. William H. Macy was a cousin to R. H. (Rowland Howland) Macy of department store fame and he made his fortune in oil and becoming part of Rockefeller’s Standard Oil. Here is an early photograph of the Macy Villa:

As early as the 1860s various factors compelled the trustees of New York Hospital to consider moving the Bloomingdale Insane Asylum. In the late 1860s they purchased nearly 300 acres in White Plains and established a farm facility for patients. Some serious though was given to moving New York Hospital from its location on lower Broadway to the Bloomingdale site. In 1889, the Asylum began selling property to finance a complete move to their White Plains property. They sold lots that were between 112th and 114th Streets and between Amsterdam Avenue and Broadway. Here is a map of the Bloomingdale Insane Asylum in 1891:

Map of The Bloomingdale Insane Asylum in 1891

In 1892, the Asylum sold its land between 116th and 120th Streets to Columbia University. In 1954, President Dwight D. Eisenhower, who had been Columbia’s president (1948-1953), used his influence to have 116th St between Amsterdam and Broadway closed to traffic and bricked over to commemorate CU’s bicentennial.

When the Bloomingdale Insane Asylum moved to White Plains, the street on which it was located then and now was named Bloomingdale Road. Very recently, a Bloomingdale’s department store opened on Bloomingdale Road.

Here is the Bloomingdale Insane Asylum in White Plains (top) and in Morningside Heights (bottom):

Bloomingdale Insane Asylum in White Plains (top) and in Morningside Heights (bottom)


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