Frank Knox DD- 742 - History

Frank Knox DD- 742 - History


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Frank Knox

Frank Knox, born 1 January 1874 in Boston, Mass., served in the famous "Rough Riders" in the SpanishAmerican War, after which he remained active in the Army Reserve during his distinguished career in journalism. He served in France during World War I, rising to major, and in later years was commissioned colonel. His outstanding service as Secretary of the Navy from 11 July 1940 until his death in Washington 28 April 1944 was marked by brilliant administration of the vast growth of the Navy in those years, as well as a clear understanding of seapower and its key role in national defense.

(DD-742: dp. 2,425;. 1. 390'6"; b. 41'2", dr. 15'8"
s. 34 k.; cpl. 336, a. 6 5", 10 21" tt. 6 dcp., 2 dct.
cl. Gearing)
Frank Knox (DD-742) was launched 17 September 1944 by Bath Iron Works Corp., Bath, Maine; sponsored by Mrs. Frank Knox, widow of Secretary Knox; and commissioned 11 December 1944, Commander J. C. Ford, Jr., in command. She was redesignated DDR-742 on 18 March 1949.

After extensive training on both coasts, Frank Knox arrived in San Pedro Bay, P.I., 16 June 1945 to join the fast carrier task forces in their raids against the Japanese home islands. With such a force, she entered Sagami Wan 27 August, and was present in Tokyo Bay during the surrender ceremonies on 2 September. She served on occupation duty in the Far East until sailing for San Diego, her home port, 4 January 1946.

In 1947 and 1948, Frank Knox completed tours of duty in the Far East, and upon the outbreak of the Korean war, sailed 6 July 1950 to join the 7th Fleet's fast carrier task force in air operations against North Korea. During her tour of duty, she also took part in the Inchon invasion, conducted shore bombardments, patrolled the Taiwan Straits, and on 30 January 1951 joined in a mock invasion of the North Korean coast. This deception proved so effective that Communist troops were withdrawn from central Korea for a time. A final 40-day period was spent in bombardment of the east coast rail centers, Chongjin and Songjin, cutting supply and communications routes.

Returning to San Diego 11 April 1951, Frank Knox operated along the west coast and in the Hawaiians until 19 April 1952, when she sailed for Korean service again. Her duty, similar to that of her first wartime tour, included several weeks in Wonsan Harbor to give fire support to minesweepers. The destroyer returned to west coast duty 18 November 1952. During her 1953 Far Eastern cruise, which coincided with the Korean armistice, Frank Knox conducted patrols, and covered the transportation of former Chinese prisoners of war who had elected to go to Taiwan rather than return from Korea to mainland Communist China.

Her next tour of duty in the western Pacific, in 1955, found Frank Knox taking part in the evacuation of the Tachen Islands. Her annual deployments to the Far East through 1962 included intensive training operations, often with ships of foreign navies, and good will visits to many ports under the President's "People-to-People" program. Several times she visited ports in Australia and New Zealand.

Frank Knox received one battle star for World War II service, and five for Korean war service.


Frank Knox DD- 742 - History

In the early hours of 18 July 1965, while underway at sixteen knots in the South China Sea, USS Frank Knox ran hard aground on Pratas Reef, some two hundred miles east south east of Hong Kong. A salvage effort was immediately begun, and soon involved salvage ships Grapple and Conserver , tugs Munsee , Cocopa and Sioux and submarine rescue ship Greenlet . Though Frank Knox was initially only somewhat damaged, several attempts to pull her free between 20 July and 2 August were unsuccessful, and the ship was driven further onto the rocks by waves from a pair of passing typhoons. She was now much more severely holed, with machinery spaces flooded and hull structure weakened.

When conventional hole patching and water removal methods proved inadequate, plastic foam was employed to fill flooded compartments, thus expelling the water and greatly enhancing Frank Knox ' bouyancy. Her hull was reinforced by welding stiffeners to the main deck. Explosives were used to break up coral around the ship, but these also produced further damage, which led to a need for more foam. Another pulling effort took place on 11 August, with a ship steaming by offshore making waves to help break the reef's grip on the grounded destroyer, but this also failed.

Salvage tackle was re-rigged, more weights were removed from Frank Knox , pontoons were attached to her hull, additional foam was generated and the destroyer Cogswell arrived to make waves as required. A pull on 22 August produced some favorable movement and, on 24 August, USS Frank Knox was finally afloat, after nearly six weeks of salvage work in a very difficult environment. Repaired in Japan, she gave the U.S. Navy another six years of service, followed by two decades as a part of the Greek Navy.

This page features all the views we have concerning the 1965 stranding and salvage of USS Frank Knox (DDR-742).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Aground on Pratas Reef, in the South China Sea, July 1965.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph.

Online Image: 86KB 740 x 610 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system as Photo # 428-N-1114711.

Aground on Pratas Reef, South China Sea, in July 1965. A H-34 type helicopter is hovering over her bow to evacuate crewmen. This was the only safe method of transportation two and from the stranded ship during the rough seas that persisted during most of the several weeks of salvage operations that finally freed Frank Knox .

Official U.S. Navy Photograph.

Online Image: 84KB 740 x 610 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system as Photo # 428-N-1113134.

Aground on Pratas Reef, South China Sea, with several ships attempting to pull her off. She went aground on 18 July 1965. This view was probably taken at about the time she was finally refloated on 24 August 1965. Ships pulling are (from left to right): Grapple (ARS-7), Conserver (ARS-39), Sious (ATF-75), Greenlet (ASR-10) and Cocopa (ATF-101).


Frank Knox DD- 742 - History

Frank Knox at 36.09 knots during standardization trials off Rockland, Maine, 2 December 1944.

After extensive training on both coasts, Frank Knox arrived in San Pedro Bay, P.I., on 16 June 1945 to join the fast carrier task forces in their raids against the Japanese home islands. With such a force, she entered Sagami Wan on 27 August, and was present in Tokyo Bay during the surrender ceremonies on 2 September. She served on occupation duty in the Far East until sailing for San Diego, her home port, on 4 January 1946.

In 1947 and 1948, Frank Knox completed tours of duty in the Far East, and upon the outbreak of the Korean War, sailed on 6 July 1950 to join the Seventh Fleet&rsquos fast carrier task force in air operations against North Korea. During her tour of duty, she also took part in the Inchon invasion, conducted shore bombardments, patrolled the Taiwan Straits and, on 30 January 1951, joined in a mock invasion of the North Korean coast. This deception proved so effective that Communist troops were withdrawn from central Korea for a time. A final 40-day period was spent in bombardment of the east coast rail centers, Chongjin and Songjin, cutting supply and communications routes.

Returning to San Diego 11 April 1951, Frank Knox operated along the west coast and in the Hawaiians until 19 April 1952, when she sailed for Korean service again. Her duty, similar to that of her first wartime tour, included several weeks in Wonsan Harbor to give fire support to minesweepers. The destroyer returned to West Coast duty on 18 November 1952. During her 1953 Far Eastern cruise, which coincided with the Korean armistice, Frank Knox conducted patrols, and covered the transportation of former Chinese prisoners of war who had elected to go to Taiwan rather than return from Korea to mainland Communist China.

Source: Naval History & Heritage Command.

Frank Knox stranded on Pratas Reef, South China Sea, July 1965.

Her next tour of duty in the western Pacific, in 1955, found Frank Knox taking part in the evacuation of the Tachen Islands. Her annual deployments to the Far East through 1962 included intensive training operations, often with ships of foreign navies, and good will visits to many ports under the President&rsquos &ldquoPeople-to-People&rdquo program. Several times she visited ports in Australia and New Zealand.

In 1960&ndash1961 Frank Knox was modernized under the FRAM II program, which gave her updated radar and other new equipment. She was based in the Far East from late 1961 until mid-1964, then returned home via Australia and the South Pacific.

Deployed again in June 1965, she served briefly off Vietnam conducting naval gunfire support and coastal patrol operations. While underway in the South China Sea on 18 July, she ran aground on Pratas Reef, and was only freed after a very difficult salvage effort. After extensive repairs at Yokosuka, Japan, Frank Knox rejoined the active forces in November 1966 and resumed her pattern of nearly annual Seventh Fleet cruises, frequently taking part in Vietnam combat missions. Redesignated DD 742 at the on 1 January 1969, she completed her final deployment in November 1970 and was decommissioned at the end of January 1971.

On 3 February 1971, Frank Knox was transferred to the Greek Navy. Until 31 August 1992, she served in the Hellenic Navy as Themistoklis (D-210) before being retired. She was sunk on 12 September 2001 as a torpedo target by the Greek Submarine Nereus (S-111).


After extensive training on both coasts, Frank Knox arrived in San Pedro Bay, P.I., on 16 June 1945 to join the fast carrier task forces in their raids against the Japanese home islands. With such a force, she entered Sagami Wan on 27 August, and was present in Tokyo Bay during the surrender ceremonies on 2 September. She served on occupation duty in the Far East until sailing for San Diego, her home port, on 4 January 1946.

In 1947 and 1948, Frank Knox completed tours of duty in the Far East, and upon the outbreak of the Korean War, sailed on 6 July 1950 to join the Seventh Fleet&rsquos fast carrier task force in air operations against North Korea. During her tour of duty, she also took part in the Inchon invasion, conducted shore bombardments, patrolled the Taiwan Straits and, on 30 January 1951, joined in a mock invasion of the North Korean coast. This deception proved so effective that Communist troops were withdrawn from central Korea for a time. A final 40-day period was spent in bombardment of the east coast rail centers, Chongjin and Songjin, cutting supply and communications routes.

Returning to San Diego 11 April 1951, Frank Knox operated along the west coast and in the Hawaiians until 19 April 1952, when she sailed for Korean service again. Her duty, similar to that of her first wartime tour, included several weeks in Wonsan Harbor to give fire support to minesweepers. The destroyer returned to West Coast duty on 18 November 1952. During her 1953 Far Eastern cruise, which coincided with the Korean armistice, Frank Knox conducted patrols, and covered the transportation of former Chinese prisoners of war who had elected to go to Taiwan rather than return from Korea to mainland Communist China.

Her next tour of duty in the western Pacific, in 1955, found Frank Knox taking part in the evacuation of the Tachen Islands. Her annual deployments to the Far East through 1962 included intensive training operations, often with ships of foreign navies, and good will visits to many ports under the President&rsquos &ldquoPeople-to-People&rdquo program. Several times she visited ports in Australia and New Zealand.


Talk:USS Frank Knox (DD-742)

  1. Referencing and citation: criterion not met
  2. Coverage and accuracy: criterion not met
  3. Structure: criterion not met
  4. Grammar and style: criterion met
  5. Supporting materials: criterion met
  • Vietnam portal

My Physics teacher in high school in 1979 served in the US Navy in the 1960's and told us the story of the Knox running aground.

Apparently the weather was squally and the radar operator picked up the signal of the reef and interpreted it as a tsunami (tidal wave). Navy SOP at the time was to head directly into a tsunami and attempt to ride over it, needless to say this was not the right thing to do for a reef ! My teacher took great delight and telling us that forever afterwards the Knox was known in Navy circles as the "Knox on the Rocks". — Preceding unsigned comment added by 58.110.117.9 (talk) 00:38, 29 July 2014 (UTC)

I have just modified one external link on USS Frank Knox (DD-742). Please take a moment to review my edit. If you have any questions, or need the bot to ignore the links, or the page altogether, please visit this simple FaQ for additional information. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, please set the checked parameter below to true or failed to let others know (documentation at <> ).

As of February 2018, "External links modified" talk page sections are no longer generated or monitored by InternetArchiveBot . No special action is required regarding these talk page notices, other than regular verification using the archive tool instructions below. Editors have permission to delete these "External links modified" talk page sections if they want to de-clutter talk pages, but see the RfC before doing mass systematic removals. This message is updated dynamically through the template <> (last update: 15 July 2018).


USS Frank Knox (DD-742)

Frank Knox was built at Bath, Maine. Commissioned in December 1944, she arrived in the western Pacific war zone in mid-June 1945, in time to participate in the final carrier air raids on the Japanese home islands as part of Task Force 38. During the Battle of Okinawa she acted as a picket destroyer giving early warnings of incoming air raids. She was present in Tokyo Bay when Japan formally surrendered on 2 September 1945 and remained in the Far East until early February 1946. The ship made additional deployments to the region during the later 1940s and was reclassified as a radar picket destroyer (DDR) in March 1949.

Frank Knox again steamed across the Pacific to take part in hostilities in early July 1950, shortly after the outbreak of the Korean War. During this combat tour, which lasted into 1951, her missions included support of the Inchon invasion, shelling enemy targets ashore and patrolling the Taiwan Straits. Two more Korean War cruises followed in 1952 and 1953, and for the rest of the decade Frank Knox deployed regularly to WestPac for Seventh Fleet service.

In 1960� Frank Knox was modernized under the FRAM II program, which gave her updated radars and other new equipment. She was based in the Far East from late 1961 until mid-1964, then returned home via Australia and the south Pacific. Again deployed in June 1965, she briefly served off Vietnam conducting naval gunfire support and coastal patrol operations. While underway in the South China Sea on 18 July, Frank Knox ran aground on Pratas Reef, and was only freed after a very difficult salvage effort. Though she was badly damaged, and relatively elderly, her command and control capabilities justified an extensive repair job, which was carried out at Yokosuka, Japan, over the next year.

Frank Knox rejoined the active forces in November 1966 and resumed her pattern of nearly annual Seventh Fleet cruises, frequently taking part in Vietnam combat missions. Redesignated DD-742 at the beginning of 1969, she completed her final deployment in November 1970 and was decommissioned at the end of January 1971. USS Frank Knox was transferred to the Greek Navy a few days later. Renamed Themistoklis (D-210) (from Themistocles Athenian statesman who persuaded Athens to build a navy and then led it to victory over the Persians), she served for another two decades before being placed out of commission in the early 1990s. The old ship was sunk as a torpedo target by the Greek Submarine Nereus (S-111) on 12 September 2001 (see video [1]).


Mục lục

Frank Knox được đặt lườn tại xưởng tàu của hãng Bath Iron Works ở Bath, Maine vào ngày 8 tháng 5 năm 1944. Nó được hạ thủy vào ngày 17 tháng 9 năm 1944 và nhập biên chế vào ngày 11 tháng 12 năm 1944.

USS Frank Knox Sửa đổi

Frank Knox lên đường đi sang khu vực Mặt trận Thái Bình Dương vào giữa tháng 6, 1945 để tham gia các đợt không kích cuối cùng từ tàu sân bay xuống các đảo chính quốc Nhật Bản trong thành phần Lực lượng Đặc nhiệm 38. Trong trận Okinawa, nó đã phục vụ như tàu cột mốc radar canh phòng nhằm cảnh báo sớm các đợt không kích của không quân đối phương và dẫn đường cho những máy bay tiêm kích tuần tra chiến đấu trên không ngăn chặn. Chiếc tàu khu trục đã có mặt trong vịnh Tokyo khi Nhật Bản chính thức đầu hàng vào ngày 2 tháng 9, và nó tiếp tục ở lại khu vực Viễn Đông cho đến đầu tháng 2, 1946. Sau đó nó còn có những đợt biệt phái sang khu vực Tây Thái Bình Dương vào cuối những năm 1940, và được xếp lại lớp như một tàu khu trục cột mốc radar với ký hiệu lườn DDR-742 vào ngày 18 tháng 3, 1949.

Do sự kiện Chiến tranh Triều Tiên bùng nổ do việc lực lượng Bắc Triều Tiên tấn công xuống lãnh thổ Nam Triều Tiên vào ngày 25 tháng 6, 1950, Hải quân Hoa Kỳ phải huy động mọi lực lượng sẵn có để can thiệp vì vậy Frank Knox lên đường vào đầu tháng 7, 1950, vượt Thái Bình Dương để đi sang khu vực xung đột. Trong lượt hoạt động kéo dài sang tận năm 1951 này, nó từng hỗ trợ cho cuộc đổ bộ lên Inchon, tham gia bắn phá các mục tiêu đối phương dọc bờ biển cũng như tuần tra tại eo biển Đài Loan. Chiếc tàu khu trục còn được phái sang hoạt động trong Chiến tranh Triều Tiên thêm hai đợt vào các năm 1952 và 1953 rồi sau đó thường xuyên được cử sang hoạt động cùng Đệ Thất hạm đội tại khu vực Tây Thái Bình Dương.

Vào năm 1960-1961, Frank Knox được nâng cấp trong khuôn khổ Chương trình Hồi sinh và Hiện đại hóa Hạm đội (FRAM II: Fleet Rehabilitation and Modernizatiion), khi nó được nâng cấp hệ thống radar cùng những thiết bị tiên tiến khác. Nó được phái đến Viễn Đông từ cuối năm 1961 đến giữa năm 1964, rồi quay trở về nhà ngang qua Australia và vùng Nam Thái Bình Dương. Lại được phái sang Viễn Đông vào tháng 6, 1965, nó phục vụ một thời gian ngắn ngoài khơi Việt Nam, hỗ trợ hải pháo cho cuộc chiến trên bộ và tuần tra chống xâm nhập trong khuôn khổ Chiến tranh Việt Nam. Đang khi di chuyển tại khu vực phía Bắc biển Đông vào ngày 18 tháng 7, nó mắc tai nạn mắc cạn tại một dãi san hô ngầm tại quần đảo Đông Sa, và chỉ được giải thoát sau những nỗ lực cứu hộ khó khăn. Cho dù con tàu chịu đựng những hư hại nghiêm trọng và đã khá cũ, khả năng chỉ huy và kiểm soát của nó đáng giá để được sửa chữa triệt để, và công việc được thực hiện tại căn cứ ở Yokosuka, Nhật Bản trong năm tiếp theo.

Frank Knox gia nhập trở lại hạm đội vào tháng 11, 1966, tiếp nối nhịp điệu được biệt phái hàng năm sang phục vụ tại Viễn Đông cùng Đệ Thất hạm đội, và thường xuyên tham gia c8ac hoạt động tác chiến tại Việt Nam. Nó quay trở lại ký hiệu lườn ban đầu DD-742 vào đầu năm 1969, hoàn tất lượt bố trí hoạt động sau cùng vào tháng 11, 1970 và được cho xuất biên chế vào cuối tháng 1, 1971.

Themistoklis (D210) Sửa đổi

Frank Knox được rút tên khỏi danh sách Đăng bạ Hải quân vào ngày 3 tháng 2, 1971, và được chuyển cho Hy Lạp cùng ngày hôm đó. Con tàu tiếp tục hoạt động cùng Hải quân Hy Lạp như là chiếc Themistoklis (D210), tên được đặt theo Themistocles, nhà chính trị gia và tướng lĩnh Hy Lạp cổ đại. Nó tiếp tục phục vụ thêm hai thập niên nữa, trước khi ngừng hoạt động vào năm 1992. Nó bị đánh chìm như một mục tiêu bởi ngư lôi phóng từ tàu ngầm Nireus (S-111) vào ngày 12 tháng 9, 2001. [1]


Posthumous honors and memorials [ edit | edit source ]

The Gearing-class destroyer USS Frank Knox (DD-742), commissioned in December 1944, was named in his honor. Δ] Ε] On May 31, 1945 he received posthumously the Medal for Merit from President Harry S. Truman. Ζ]

It seems probable that his Canadian roots led his widow, Annie Reid Knox Γ] in 1948 to endow several fellowships in his name - the Frank Knox Memorial Fellowships - which allow scholars from Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom to pursue graduate study at Harvard University or allow recent graduates of Harvard University to travel and research in commonwealth countries. ΐ]


Frank Knox DD- 742 - History

USS Frank Knox , a 2425-ton Gearing class destroyer, was built at Bath, Maine. Commissioned in December 1944, she arrived in the western Pacific war zone in mid-June 1945, in time to participate in the final carrier air raids on the Japanese home islands as part of Task Force 38. She was present in Tokyo Bay when Japan formally surrendered on 2 September 1945 and remained in the Far East until early February 1946. The ship made additional deployments to the region during the later 1940s and was reclassified as a radar picket destroyer (DDR) in March 1949.

Frank Knox again steamed across the Pacific to take part in hostilities in early July 1950, shortly after the outbreak of the Korean War. During this combat tour, which lasted into 1951, her missions included support of the Inchon invasion, shelling enemy targets ashore and patrolling the Taiwan Straits. Two more Korean War cruises followed in 1952 and 1953, and for the rest of the decade Frank Knox deployed regularly to "WestPac" for Seventh Fleet service.

In 1960-1961 Frank Knox was modernized under the FRAM II program, which gave her updated radars and other new equipment. She was based in the Far East from late 1961 until mid-1964, then returned home via Australia and the south Pacific. Again deployed in June 1965, she briefly served off Vietnam conducting naval gunfire support and coastal patrol operations. While underway in the South China Sea on 18 July, Frank Knox ran aground on Pratas Reef, and was only freed after a very difficult salvage effort. Though she was badly damaged, and relatively elderly, her command and control capabilities justified an extensive repair job, which was carried out at Yokosuka, Japan, over the next year.

Frank Knox rejoined the active forces in November 1966 and resumed her pattern of nearly annual Seventh Fleet cruises, frequently taking part in Vietnam combat missions. Redesignated DD-742 at the beginning of 1969, she completed her final deployment in November 1970 and was decommissioned at the end of January 1971. USS Frank Knox was transferred to the Greek Navy a few days later. Renamed Themistoklis , she served for another two decades before being placed out of commission in the early 1990s. The old ship was sunk as a torpedo target by the Greek submarine Kyklon on 12 September 2001.

USS Frank Knox was named in honor of Frank Knox (1874-1944), who was Secretary of the Navy in 1940-1944.

This page features all the views we have of USS Frank Knox (DD-742, later DDR-742 and DD-742) and provides links to other images concerning this ship.

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Underway at high speed on a trial run off Rockland, Maine, 2 December 1944.
Photographed from an aircraft based as Naval Air Station Brunswick, Maine.
The ship is painted in camouflage Measure 33A, Design 28D.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 127KB 740 x 610 pixels

Off the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California, at the conclusion of her FRAM II modernization, 25 April 1961.
Note that hull numbers painted on her bow have not yet had countershading applied.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 88KB 750 x 610 pixels

Off the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California, at the conclusion of her FRAM II modernization, 25 April 1961.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 96KB 750 x 615 pixels

Off the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California, at the conclusion of her FRAM II modernization, 25 April 1961.
Note that variable-depth sonar (VDS) gear has not yet been installed on her fantail.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 75KB 750 x 615 pixels

Off the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California, at the conclusion of her FRAM II modernization, 25 April 1961.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 106KB 750 x 620 pixels

Underway off the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California, 25 April 1961, at the conclusion of her FRAM II modernization.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 95KB 750 x 615 pixels

Comes alongside USS Coral Sea (CVA-63), while operating at sea on 2 May 1964.
Photographed by Wiggand.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 122KB 750 x 600 pixels

Underway near Hawaii, January 1969.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph.

Online Image: 101KB 740 x 555 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system as Photo # 428-K-67405.
Though reproductions of this photo from the Naval Historical Center's collections are available in black & white only, those from the National Archives should be available in color.

Underway off the coast of Oahu, Hawaii, 15 January 1969.
Photographed by PH2 S.C. Wyckoff.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph.

Online Image: 135KB 740 x 610 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system as Photo # 428-KN-17646.
Though reproductions of this photo from the Naval Historical Center's collections are available in black & white only, those from the National Archives should be available in color.

Jacket patch of the ship's insignia, as used during the 1960s.
Its design is partially based on the flag of the Secretary of the Navy, an office held by Frank Knox from 1940 until his death in 1944.

Courtesy of Captain G.F. Swainson, USN, 1969.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 146KB 600 x 675 pixels

In addition to the images presented above, the National Archives appears to hold at other views of USS Frank Knox (DD-742, later DDR-742). The following list features some of these photographs:

The images listed below are NOT in the Naval Historical Center's collections.
DO NOT try to obtain them using the procedures described in our page "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions".

Reproductions of these images should be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system for pictures not held by the Naval Historical Center.


Frank Knox DD- 742 - History

Commanding Officer

Executive Officer

LCDR Leland S. Beedle

Change of Command – November 1969

Change of Command – November 1969

LCDR Milton Jackson Jr.
November 1969 – September 1971

Command history report for 1969, from the Commanding Officer, CDR Gerald Michael Carter Jr, to the Chief of Naval Operations – in PDF format – click here DDG-8 1969
(contributed by )

The USS Lynde McCormick’s ports of call on this cruise include Lahaina, Pearl Harbor, Midway, Guam, Subic Bay, Kaohsiung, Subic Bay, Hong Kong, Sasebo, Subic Bay, Manus, Cairns, South Molle, Brisbane, Pago Pago, Pearl Harbor.

The USS Lynde McCormick meets highest naval standards completing 72 missions in gun line operation. Gun damage assessments included damaging or destroying over 400 structures, 150 bunkers, mortar positions, bridges, supply dumps, sampans, and much close in support for troops ashore.

24 February 1969, Nha Trang, Viet Nam. The USS Lynde McCormick responds to an urgent call for help and support and moves into Nha Trang’s small cluttered harbor at 25 knots, in the still dark dawn of the morning, with her 5 inch 54’s firing star shells and high explosive projectiles into the surrounding hills, she swings broadside to the shoreline and comes to a full stop. The Viet Cong are making a determined attach on military positions and the airport. The naval gunfire spotters, both airborne and ground, direct fire to the advancing enemy. The overwhelming firepower and the array of star shells by the USS Lynde McCormick expose their positions to defensive fire from ground and airborne units causing the VC to retreat. The USS Lynde McCormick arcs high explosive projectiles into the VC’s escape trails. The extreme expertise of the ship’s officers and crew in maneuvering, and the ability to bring firepower onto the enemy have saved the day and a lot of marines lives.

27 February 1969, Qui Nhon, Viet Nam, The blazing 5 inch 54 caliber guns of the USS Lynde McCormick find their mark on enemy positions south of the city as the ship attacks a company size VC regiment base camp. Airborne birddog spotters direct the ship’s pinpoint gunfire and destroy the VC base camp. The USS Lynde McCormick then proceeds to destroy four enemy bunkers and two other structures.

15 April 1969, t he USS Lynde McCormick is patrolling in the Sea of Japan, when a North Korean plane shoots down a U.S. Navy EC-121 surveillance plane, killing all 31 Americans aboard. The USS Lynde McCormick does rescue and recovery, but to no avail.
( Time magazine article) ( Stars and Stripes Article)

21 June 1969, In port at Subic Bay, we were witness to the remains of the USS FRANK E. EVANS (DD-754) On 3 June 1969, the USS FRANK E. EVANS (DD-754) was cut in half by the Australian Aircraft Carrier MELBOURNE R-21. The bow sank taking over 80 sailors with it. The stern somehow stayed afloat. The USS FRANK E. EVANS was towed to Subic Bay, dry-docked, surveyed and stricken from the Naval Vessel Register. USS FRANK E. EVANS was towed out to sea, and in October of 1969 the stern half was sunk by the USS COCHRANE DDG 21 in torpedo and gunnery exercises.


Watch the video: SNHU Throwback Thursday - USS Frank Knox 10