1892 Republican Convention - History

1892 Republican Convention - History


1892 Republican Convention in Minneapolis

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1892 Republican National Convention in Minneapolis

“The 1892 Republican National Convention was held in Minneapolis and was also the first convention where women were allowed to be delegates. Mrs. Therese Alberta (Parkinson) Jenkins, delegate from Wyoming, cast the first vote by a woman for President. Wyoming had granted full suffrage for women at statehood in 1890.” *

Politics, in practice, is often a game of solidifying one’s base and fracturing the support of political opponents. One seeks to heal and forgive, while the other actively fragments relationships and maintains a grudge?! Although there will always be those who are honestly committed to their principles, most often, the duplicitous ‘win-at-all-cost’ partisans seem to be the norm.

Rules and procedures are put in place to ensure that conventions are fair. However, those who know the rules often use them to beat up those who don’t, or those who simply trust in the integrity of their party. It’s like watching a board game played by children the worst child will change the rules until he wins!

Jesus, show me what You see. I have limited vision of this convention, but am not unfamiliar with the Republican Party. Help me dredge what is crucial, and leave the rest of the silt at the bottom of the river.

To begin, I thank You that one day, You will bring Your government to earth, and we will see real peace! Thank You that You cannot be double-minded, or attempt to create something good with false motives! You are the summit of integrity because You are perfect in contentment! You resist all bribes because there are no possessions that finite beings can give to the Eternal “I Am”!

Your names in the Bible describe your character, and they include both male and female attributes. Men and women are both made in Your image. Thank You that we finally began to recognize this fact politically on June 7, 1892! Will You bless this day, those who participated, their opponents, and their heritage?

Will You forgive the dominant male pride and ego in the politics of Minnesota, its parties, and conventions? Conversely, will You forgive the bitter counter-judgments of women whether past, present, or future? Men want to lead like men, women want to lead like women, and we both fail to recognize Your wisdom and glory in the other at times! We fail to see Your hand of leadership in the other because we do not recognize its style or legitimacy. Have mercy on our judgments of our fathers’ strength of love, and our mothers’ tenderness of love!

Bless the heritage of pioneers like Mrs. Therese Alberta (Parkinson) Jenkins. Bless her commitment and bravery. Forgive the scoffing her ears heard, the contemptuous faces she saw, and the judgments of her motives. Will You reverse the curses of this convention of 1892, and may we receive Your future insights whether housed in a male or female messenger?

***Another wonderful article about the convention? Read “African Americans and the 1892 Republican National Convention, Minneapolis” by Iric Nathanson


1892 Republican National Convention in Minneapolis

“The 1892 Republican National Convention was held in Minneapolis and was also the first convention where women were allowed to be delegates. Mrs. Therese Alberta (Parkinson) Jenkins, delegate from Wyoming, cast the first vote by a woman for President. Wyoming had granted full suffrage for women at statehood in 1890.” *

Politics, in practice, is often a game of solidifying one’s base and fracturing the support of political opponents. One seeks to heal and forgive, while the other actively fragments relationships and maintains a grudge?! Although there will always be those who are honestly committed to their principles, most often, the duplicitous ‘win-at-all-cost’ partisans seem to be the norm.

Rules and procedures are put in place to ensure that conventions are fair. However, those who know the rules often use them to beat up those who don’t, or those who simply trust in the integrity of their party. It’s like watching a board game played by children the worst child will change the rules until he wins!

Jesus, show me what You see. I have limited vision of this convention, but am not unfamiliar with the Republican Party. Help me dredge what is crucial, and leave the rest of the silt at the bottom of the river.

To begin, I thank You that one day, You will bring Your government to earth, and we will see real peace! Thank You that You cannot be double-minded, or attempt to create something good with false motives! You are the summit of integrity because You are perfect in contentment! You resist all bribes because there are no possessions that finite beings can give to the Eternal “I Am”!

Your names in the Bible describe your character, and they include both male and female attributes. Men and women are both made in Your image. Thank You that we finally began to recognize this fact politically on June 7, 1892! Will You bless this day, those who participated, their opponents, and their heritage?

Will You forgive the dominant male pride and ego in the politics of Minnesota, its parties, and conventions? Conversely, will You forgive the bitter counter-judgments of women whether past, present, or future? Men want to lead like men, women want to lead like women, and we both fail to recognize Your wisdom and glory in the other at times! We fail to see Your hand of leadership in the other because we do not recognize its style or legitimacy. Have mercy on our judgments of our fathers’ strength of love, and our mothers’ tenderness of love!

Bless the heritage of pioneers like Mrs. Therese Alberta (Parkinson) Jenkins. Bless her commitment and bravery. Forgive the scoffing her ears heard, the contemptuous faces she saw, and the judgments of her motives. Will You reverse the curses of this convention of 1892, and may we receive Your future insights whether housed in a male or female messenger?

***Another wonderful article about the convention? Read “African Americans and the 1892 Republican National Convention, Minneapolis” by Iric Nathanson


Books & Other Publications

Convention Manual and Visitors' Guide for Delegates, Alternates, and Visitors.
A complete list of delegates and alternates, with addresses, by states . with Twin City guide for visitors.
Minneapolis: [n.p.], 1892.
MNHS call number: Digital Copy

Directory of Delegates and Alternates, Republican National Convention, Minneapolis, 1892, with Plan of Hall.
Minneapolis: [Tribune Job Printing Co.], 1892.
MNHS call number: Digital Copy

"The Minneapolis Convention."
In Harper's Weekly , vol. 36 (June 18, 1892): pp. 577-583.
MNHS call number: FOLIO AP 2 .H32 Volume 36

Proceedings of the Tenth Republican National Convention: Held in the City of Minneapolis, Minn., June 7, 8, 9, and 10, 1892 . reported by Theodore C. Rose and James F. Burke, official stenographers.
Minneapolis, Minn.: Harrison & Smith, printers, 1892.
MNHS call number: JK2353 1892


Categories

Juneteenth is the holiday commemorating the abolition of slavery in the United States as announced on June 19, 1865 in Galveston, Texas.

Juneteenth has been celebrated as a community holiday for over 30 years in the Twin Cities Minneapolis declared it an official holiday this year.

This "Minnesota Soul" T-shirt was designed and produced by Lee Jordan. It was sold at the 1990 Juneteenth celebration, Minneapolis.


Collection on the Republican National Convention of 1892

This collection consists of three boxes of correspondence, clippings, and ephemera regarding the Republican National Convention of 1892. The first and second boxes contain correspondence between members of the press and the Convention committee regarding attendance and accomodations. The correspondence is organized by state. Of particular interest are the letterheads of various newspapers, both large and small, from the Baltimore Sun to the Sioux City Times.

The third box contains directories and programs from the event, ephemera including tickets and delegate ribbons from the convention hall, and newspaper clippings remembering the convention. Also in the third box are a facsimile of the front page of the Convention edition of the Minneapolis Tribune, June 7, 1892, an 1892 Cosmopolitan article describing the Convention, and "Convention City - The Republicans in Minneapolis, 1892", a comprehensive article on the planning and execution of the convention from the journal Minnesota History , June 1956.

Dates

Creator

Access Restrictions

History

The Republican National Convention of 1892, which took place from June 7 to June 10, was the first national political convention to take place west of the Mississippi. Held at the Industrial Exposition Building, in Minneapolis, the result of the convention was the nomination of the Benjamin Harrison for re-election as President and Whitelaw Reid of New York for Vice President. Harrison lost his bid for re-election and Grover Cleveland succeeded him as President.

The Convention's arrival in Minneapolis was contingent on a suitably sized hall and the availablity of accomodations for delegates and members of the press. The Industrial Exposition Building, built in response to Saint Paul's construction of the state fairgrounds, had seven and half acres of floor space and a total seating capacity of between eleven and fifteen thousand. With construction complete in 1887, the city made a bid for the 1888 Republican Convention, but lost to Chicago. In bidding for the 1892 Convention, the convention committee convinced Chicago not to enter a bid and got Western Union to install more telegraph wires in Minneapolis to support press coverage. The committee's bid was accepted by the Republican national committee on November 23, 1891, and planning went into high gear. The convention drew in about thirty-five thousand people, which was well below the estimated hundred thousand the committee had expected, but in the process of planning for the convention, Minneapolis built up city infrastructure and showed its metropolitan character to the country.

The bulk of this collection consists of correspondence regarding press accomodations. The citizen's executive committee, led by George A. Brackett, was responsible for the logistics of housing, feeding, and transporting people from all over the country, and the collection reflects the complexity and immensity of this task. Arrangements specifically for the press were handled by a separate committee, chaired by Gilbert A. Pierce of the Minneapolis Tribune. Many members of the press were housed at the newly built New York Life Insurance Building, which was converted to a hotel just for the event, and reconverted to offices afterwards. Others stayed in hotels in Saint Paul and Minneapolis, and some lodged in boarding houses or private homes.


1892 Republican Platform

The representatives of the Republicans of the United States, assembled in general convention on the shores of the Mississippi River, the everlasting bond of an indestructible Republic, whose most glorious chapter of history is the record of the Republican party, congratulate their countrymen on the majestic march of the nation under the banners inscribed with the principles of our platform of 1888, vindicated by victory at the polls and prosperity in our fields, workshops and mines, and make the following declaration of principles:

We reaffirm the American doctrine of protection. We call attention to its growth abroad. We maintain that the prosperous condition of our country is largely due to the wise revenue legislation of the Republican congress.

We believe that all articles which cannot be produced in the United States, except luxuries, should be admitted free of duty, and that on all imports coming into competition with the products of American labor, there should be levied duties equal to the difference between wagesabroad and at home. We assert that the prices of manufactured articles of general consumption have been reduced under the operations of the tariff act of 1890.

We denounce the efforts of the Democratic majority of the House of Representatives to destroy our tariff laws by piecemeal, as manifested by their attacks upon wool, lead and lead ores, the chief products of a number of States, and we ask the people for their judgment thereon.

We point to the success of the Republican policy of reciprocity, under which our export trade has vastly increased and new and enlarged markets have been opened for the products of our farms and workshops. We remind the people of the bitter opposition of the Democratic party to this practical business measure, and claim that, executed by a Republican administration, our present laws will eventually give us control of the trade of the world.

The American people, from tradition and interest, favor bi-metallism, and the Republican party demands the use of both gold and silver as standard money, with such restrictions and under such provisions, to be determined by legislation, as will secure the maintenance of the parity of values of the two metals so that the purchasing and debt-paying power of the dollar, whether of silver, gold, or paper, shall be at all times equal. The interests of the producers of the country, its farmers and its workingmen, demand that every dollar, paper or coin, issued by the government, shall be as good as any other.

We commend the wise and patriotic steps already taken by our government to secure an international conference, to adopt such measures as will insure a parity of value between gold and silver for use as money throughout the world.

We demand that every citizen of the United States shall be allowed to cast one free and unrestricted ballot in all public elections, and that such ballot shall be counted and returned as cast that such laws shall be enacted and enforced as will secure to every citizen, be he rich or poor, native or foreign-born, white or black, this sovereign right, guaranteed by the Constitution. The free and honest popular ballot, the just and equal representation of all the people, as well as their just and equal protection under the laws, are the foundation of our Republican institutions, and the party will never relax its efforts until the integrity of the ballot and the purity of elections shall be fully guaranteed and protected in every State.

Southern Outrages

We denounce the continued inhuman outrages perpetrated upon American citizens for political reasons in certain Southern States of the Union.

Foreign Relations

We favor the extension of our foreign commerce, the restoration of our mercantile marine by home-built ships, and the creation of a navy for the protection of our National interests and the honor of our flag the maintenance of the most friendly relations with all foreign powers entangling alliances with none and the protection of the rights of our fishermen.

We reaffirm our approval of the Monroe doctrine and believe in the achievement of the manifest destiny of the Republic in its broadest sense.

We favor the enactment of more stringent laws and regulations for the restriction of criminal, pauper and contract immigration.

Miscellaneous

We favor efficient legislation by Congress to protect the life and limbs of employees of transportation companies engaged in carrying on inter-State commerce, and recommend legislation by the respective States that will protect employees engaged in State commerce, in mining and manufacturing.

The Republican party has always been the champion of the oppressed and recognizes the dignity of manhood, irrespective of faith, color, or nationality it sympathizes with the cause of home rule in Ireland, and protests against the persecution of the Jews in Russia.

The ultimate reliance of free popular government is the intelligence of the people, and the maintenance of freedom among men. We therefore declare anew our devotion to liberty of thought and conscience, of speech and press, and approve all agencies and instrumentalities which contribute to the education of the children of the land, but while insisting upon the fullest measure of religious liberty, we are opposed to any union of Church and State. We reaffirm our opposition, declared in the

Republican platform of 1888, to all combinations of capital organized in trusts or otherwise, to control arbitrarily the condition of trade among our citizens.

We heartily indorse the action already taken upon this subject, and ask for such further legislation as may be required to remedy any defects in existing laws, and to render their enforcement more complete and effective.

We approve the policy of extending to towns, villages and rural communities the advantages of the free delivery service, now enjoyed by the larger cities of the country, and reaffirm the declaration contained in the Republican platform of 1888, pledging the reduction of letter postage to 1 cent at the earliest possible moment consistent with the maintenance of the Post Office Department and the highest class of postal service.

We commend the spirit and evidence of reform in the civil service, and the wise and consistent enforcement by the Republican party of the laws regulating the same.

Nicaragua Canal

The construction of the Nicaragua Canal is of the highest importance to the American people, both as a measure of National defense and to build up and maintain American commerce, and it should be controlled by the United States Government.

Territories

We favor the admission of the remaining Territories at the earliest practicable date, having due regard to the interests of the people of the Territories and of the United States. All the Federal officers appointed for the Territories should be selected from bona-fide residents thereof, and the right of self-government should be accorded as far as practicable.

We favor the cession, subject to the homestead laws, of the arid public lands, to the States and Territories in which they lie, under such Congressional restrictions as to disposition, reclamation and occupancy by settlers as will secure the maximum benefits to the people.

The Columbian Exposition

The World's Columbian Exposition is a greatnational undertaking, and Congress should promptly enact such reasonable legislation in aid thereof as will insure a discharge of the expenses and obligations incident thereto, and the attainment of results commensurate with the dignity and progress of the Nation.

Intemperance

We sympathize with all wise and legitimate efforts to lessen and prevent the evils of intemperance and promote morality.

Ever mindful of the services and sacrifices of the men who saved the life of the Nation, we pledge anew to the veteran soldiers of the Republic a watchful care and recognition of their just claims upon a grateful people.

Harrison's Administration

We commend the able, patriotic and thoroughly American administration of President Harrison. Under it the country has enjoyed remarkable prosperity and the dignity and honor of the Nation, at home and abroad, have been faithfully maintained, and we offer the record of pledges kept as a guarantee of faithful performance in the future.


Election of 1892

Benjamin Harrison, the sitting president, did not enjoy the Republican Party's unified backing at the convention in 1892. The president had offended the political bosses by his forays into civil service reform as well as a large segment of the general public by his staunch support of the McKinley Tariff. Even Harrison's cabinet found his personality icy and unappealing. Despite support for rivals James G. Blaine and William McKinley, Harrison managed to secure renomination on the first ballot. The Democrats turned again to Grover Cleveland, victor in 1884 and loser in 1888. The nominee, like his opponent, did not lead a unified party southern and western elements agitated for support of silver programs, but did not prevail. The primary plank in the democratic platform called for the enactment of a tariff for revenue only—an obvious reaction to the McKinley Tariff. A third party, the Populists (or People's) Party, gave its nomination to General James B. Weaver. Its platform called for free and unlimited coinage of silver and government ownership of the railroads. Both of those positions were crafted to appeal to the miners and farmers. The campaign in 1892 was subdued, due largely to Cleveland's insistence. He respected the fact that Harrison's wife was seriously ill and made a minimum of appearances. Mrs. Harrison died two weeks before the election. Cleveland was returned to office. He enjoyed solid support in the South and the Swing States, and managed to draw a number of votes from Republicans who were unhappy with Harrison. Weaver and the Populists became the first third party since 1860 to register electoral votes.


Categories

Juneteenth is the holiday commemorating the abolition of slavery in the United States as announced on June 19, 1865 in Galveston, Texas.

Juneteenth has been celebrated as a community holiday for over 30 years in the Twin Cities Minneapolis declared it an official holiday this year.

This "Minnesota Soul" T-shirt was designed and produced by Lee Jordan. It was sold at the 1990 Juneteenth celebration, Minneapolis.