General W.G. Haan AP-158 - History

General W.G. Haan AP-158 - History

General W.G. Haan AP-158

General W. G. Haan

William George Haan, born at Crown Point, Inc., 4 October 1863, graduated from the U.S. Military Academy in 1889. Commissioned Second Lieutenant of Artillery, he served at various posts until l898 when he fought in the Philippines against the insurrectionists. Returning to the United States in 1901, Haan commanded artillery units and performed staff work until the American entry into World War I. During the war he commanded the 32d Division in France; and, after the Armistice, he headed the VII Corps on occupation duty in Germany. General Haan received the Distinguished Service Medal for World War I service, and, upon his return to the United States, he served on the General Staff in Washington until his retirement in 1922. Major General Haan died Washington, D.C., 26 October 1924.

(AP-158; dp. 9,950 (It.); 1. 522'10"; b. 71'6"; dr. 24'; s. 16 k.; cpl. 356; trp. 3,823; a. 4 5", 4 40mm., 16 20mm.;

cl. General A. O. Squier; T. C4 S-A1)

General W. A. Haan (AP-158) was launched 20 March 1945 under Maritime Commission contract by Kaiser Co. Inc., Yard 3, Richmond, Calif.; sponsored by Miss Helen Coxhead; acquired by the Navy and simultaneously commissioned 2 August 1945, Comdr. J. V. Rylander in command.

General W. Haan conducted shakedown training out of San Diego until after the surrender of Japan. Departing 4 September 1945 for the southwest Pacific, the transport touched at Eniwetok, Leyte and Manila before returning to Seattle with homecoming veterans 22 October. Subsequently, the ship made two voyages to Japan and the Philippines, bringing occupation troops and embarking returning servicemen. She returned to San Francisco after her last passage, and departed 30 April 1946 for the East Coast via the Panama Canal. Arriving Baltimore 25 May, General W. Haan decommissioned there 7 June 1946 and was returned to WSA for further transfer to the Army Transport Service.

Reacquired by the Navy 1 March 1950, General W. Haan was assigned to MSTS under a civilian crew. Until 1953 she operated under the International Refugee Organization and carried displaced East Europeans from northern European ports to the United States. In 1952 General W. Haan also made two support voyages to the American bases at Thule, Greenland, and Goose Bay, Labrador. Following this demanding duty, the ship made several voyages to Europe in support of American units. She continued this steaming schedule until March 1955 when she was placed in Reduced Operational Status at New York.

In December 1958 General W.A. Haan resumed duty as an refugee transport. Steaming from New York to Bremerhaven, Germany, she embarked refugees from the gallant, but ill-fated Hungarian Revolution and brought them to New York. On 7 January 1957 she was again placed in Reduced Operational Status. General W.A. Haan was subsequently placed in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Orange, Tex., and was returned to the Maritime Administration 22 October 1958. She entered the National Defense Reserve Fleet at nearby Beaumont, where she remains.


USS General W. G. Haan (AP-158)

USS General W. G. Haan (AP-158) was a General G. O. Squier-class transport ship for the U.S. Navy in World War II. She was named in honor of U.S. Army general William George Haan. She was transferred to the U.S. Army as USAT General W. G. Haan in 1946. On 1 March 1950 she was transferred to the Military Sea Transportation Service (MSTS) as USNS General W. G. Haan (T-AP-158). She was later sold for commercial operation under several names before being scrapped in 1987. Ώ]


Operational history

General W. G. Haan (AP-158) was launched 20 March 1945 under Maritime Commission contract (MC #715) by Kaiser Co., Inc., Yard 3, Richmond, California sponsored by Miss Helen Coxhead acquired by the Navy and simultaneously commissioned 2 August 1945, Comdr. J. V. Rylander in command.

General W. G. Haan conducted shakedown training out of San Diego until after the surrender of Japan. Departing 4 September 1945 for the southwest Pacific, the transport touched at Eniwetok, Leyte, and Manila before returning to Seattle with homecoming veterans 22 October. Subsequently, the ship made two voyages to Japan and the Philippines, bringing occupation troops and embarking returning servicemen. She returned to San Francisco after her last passage, and departed 30 April 1946 for the East Coast via the Panama Canal. Arriving Baltimore 25 May, General W. G. Haan decommissioned there 7 June 1946 and was returned to WSA for further transfer to the Army Transport Service.

On 2 October 1949, USAT General W. G. Haan departed Naples with 1303 displaced persons from Eastern Europe for resettlement in Australia [2] arriving 15 November 1949 at Melbourne. [3] On December 18, 1949, she left Bremerhaven arriving December 28th in New York City with mostly Polish passengers. She completed another voyage to Melbourne on 20 February 1950 with 1301 more refugees. [3]

Reacquired by the Navy 1 March 1950, General W. G. Haan was assigned to MSTS under a civilian crew. Until 1953 she operated under the International Refugee Organization and carried displaced East Europeans from northern European ports to the United States. In 1952 General W. G. Haan also made two support voyages to the American bases at Thule, Greenland, and Goose Bay, Labrador. Following this demanding duty, the ship made several voyages to Europe in support of American units. She continued this steaming schedule until March 1955 when she was placed in Reduced Operational Status at New York.

In December 1956 General W. G. Haan resumed duty as a refugee transport. Steaming from New York to Bremerhaven, Germany, she embarked refugees from the Hungarian Revolution and brought them to New York. On 7 January 1957 she was again placed in Reduced Operational Status. General W. G. Haan was subsequently placed in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Orange, Texas, and was returned to the' Maritime Administration 22 October 1958. She entered the National Defense Reserve Fleet at nearby Beaumont, where she remained until sold for commercial use in 1968 [4] to Hudson Waterways Corporation of New York. She was rebuilt as a 13,489 gross ton container ship by Maryland Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co. in Baltimore. [5] Renamed Transoregon, she began service in December 1969. In 1975 she was sold to the Puerto Rico Maritime Shipping Authority and renamed Mayaguez. She was sold in 1982 to Merchant Terminal Corporation of New York and renamed Amco Trader. In 1985 she remained laid up in New York. [5] She was scrapped at Taiwan in 1987. [1]


General W.G. Haan AP-158 - History

From: Dictionary of American Fighting Ships

William George Haan, born at Crown Point, Ind., 4 October 1863, graduated from the U.S. Military Academy in 1889. Commissioned Second Lieutenant of Artillery, he served at various posts until 1898 when he fought in the Philippines against the insurrectionists. Returning to the United States in 1901, Haan commanded artillery units and performed staff work until the American entry into World War I. During the war he commanded the 32d Division in France and, after the Armistice, he headed the VII Corps on occupation duty in Germany. General Haan received the Distinguished Service Medal for World War I service and, upon his return to the United States, he served on the General Staff in Washington until his retirement in 1922. Major General Haan died in Washington, D.C., 26 October 1924.

(AP - 158: dp. 9,950 (lt.) l. 522'10" b. 71'6" dr. 24' s. 16 k. cpl. 356 trp. 3,823 a. 4 5", 4 40mm., 16 20mm. cl. General G. O. Squier T. C4-S-A1)

General W. G. Haan (AP-158) was launched 20 March 1945 under Maritime Commission contract by Kaiser Co. Inc., Yard 3, Richmond, Calif. sponsored by Miss Helen Coxhead acquired by the Navy and simultaneously commissioned 2 August 1945, Comdr. J. V. Rylander in command.

General W. G. Haan conducted shakedown training out of San Diego until after the surrender of Japan. Departing 4 September 1945 for the southwest Pacific, the transport touched at Eniwetok, Leyte and Manila before returning to Seattle with homecoming veterans 22 October. Subsequently, the ship made two voyages to Japan and the Philippines, bringing occupation troops and embarking returning servicemen. She returned to San Francisco after her last passage, and departed 30 April 1946 for the East Coast via the Panama Canal. Arriving Baltimore 25 May, General W. G. Haan decommissioned there 7 June 1946 and was returned to WSA for further transfer to the Army Transport Service.

Reacquired by the Navy 1 March 1950, General W. G. Haan was assigned to MSTS under a civilian crew. Until 1953 she operated under the International Refugee Organization and carried displaced East Europeans from northern European ports to the United States. In 1952 General W. G. Haan also made two support voyages to the American bases at Thule, Greenland, and Goose Bay, Labrador. Following this demanding duty, the ship made several voyages to Europe in support of American units. She continued this steaming schedule until March 1955 when she was placed in Reduced Operational Status at New York.

In December 1958 General W. G. Haan resumed duty as an refugee transport. Steaming from New York to Bremerhaven, Germany, she embarked refugees from the gallant, but ill-fated Hungarian Revolution and brought them to New York. On 7 January 1957 she was again placed in Reduced Operational Status. General W. G. Haan was subsequently placed in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Orange, Tex., and was returned to the Maritime Administration 22 October 1958. She entered the National Defense Reserve Fleet at nearby Beaumont, where she remains.


32nd Division Commander during World War I

In April 1917, he was given the temporary rank of Brigadier General and assigned to command the 57th Field Artillery Brigade of the 32nd Infantry Division at Camp MacArthur, Texas. Troop E commanded by Captain John S. Coney was formed in Kenosha on May 10, 1917, and the Division was officially formed on May 29, 1917. [2] On August 26, 1917, Major General James Parker assumed command. General Parker had previously been awarded the Medal of Honor during the Philippine-American War. Only two months later, the 32nd Division was activated in July 1917 at Camp MacArthur, Waco, Texas of National Guard units from Wisconsin and Michigan. In December 1917, Haan was promoted again to the temporary rank of Major General and commander of the Division.

Division leadership was switched several times between Parker and Haan before the unit arrived in France in February 1918 under Haan's leadership, becoming the sixth U.S. division to join the American Expeditionary Force. In July, it entered the line with the French 6th Army.

32nd Division combat in France and Germany

The Division's men were the first American soldiers to enter cross the German border, piercing the famed and until this time invincible German Hindenburg Line of defense. Major General James Parker reassumed command on December 7, 1917, leading the unit into Alsace in May 1918, attacking 19 kilometres (12 mi) in seven days.

Origin of the 32nd Division nickname

During the Battle of Marne, the 32nd Division captured Fismes, and during August their successful capture of Juvigny earned it the nickname "Le Terribles". A French general, impressed by their accomplishment, commented that they ""shot through every line the Germans put before it." The division was nicknamed Les Terribles, honoring them for their unrelenting and successful attacks against the Germans. The division's shoulder patch, a line shot through with a red arrow, signifies its tenacity during World War I. [3] It was the only American unit in General Charles Mangins famous 10th French Army, it fought in the Oise-Aisne offensive. [4]

The Division fought continuously for 20 days during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive and penetrated the last German defensive stronghold, the Kriemhilde Stellung, crossing the Meuse River. Up to this point much of the war had been a stalemate, fought from static trench lines over the same few kilometers of terrain. [4]

Their next objective was to flank the Germans at Metz. The division was the front line element of the Third U.S. Army. Members of the Division marched 300 kilometres (190 mi) to the Rhine River. They were the first Allied Army Unit to pierce the famed German Hindenburg Line of defense. There they occupied the center sector in the Colbenz bridgehead for four months, during which they held 400 square kilometers and 63 towns. From May through November 1918, they were given only 10 days of rest. The Division fought in three major offensives, engaging and defeating 23 German divisions. They took 2,153 prisoners and gained 32 kilometres (20 mi), pushing back every German counterattack. Their success was remarkable. [4]

In November, following the armistice, Hann became commander of VII Corps for occupation duty. A few days later he was promoted to permanent Brigadier General. In April 1919 he returned to the US with 32nd Division, and after its inactivation again, assigned to the General Staff.

Casualties and decorations

The 32nd Division was still engaging German troops east of the Meuse River when the Armistice was finally signed. The division suffered a total of 13,261 casualties, including 2,250 men killed in action and 11,011 wounded, placing it third in the number of battle deaths among U.S. Army divisions. The American, French, and Belgian governments decorated more than 800 officers and enlisted men for their gallantry in combat. [4]

All four division infantry regiments, the three artillery regiments, and the division's three machine gun battalions were awarded the Croix de guerre by the Republic of France. The flag and standard of every unit in the division was authorized four American battle streamers. [4]


Records of Headquarters Army Ground Forces [AGF]

Established: In the War Department, effective March 9, 1942, by Circular 59, War Department, March 2, 1942, pursuant to EO 9082, February 28, 1942.

Predecessor Agencies:

In the War Department:

Chiefs of Arms:

  • Chief of Artillery (1901-8)
  • Chief of Coast Artillery (1908-42)
  • Chief of Field Artillery (1920-42)
  • Chief of Infantry (1920-42)
  • Chief of Cavalry (1920-42)
  • General Headquarters (GHQ) U.S. Army (1940-42)

Transfers: To Department of the Army, by Circular 1, Department of the Army, September 18, 1947, implementing Circular 225, War Department, August 16, 1947, issued pursuant to National Security Act of 1947 (61 Stat. 501), July 26, 1947, abolishing War Department and establishing Department of the Army as a component of the National Military Establishment.

Functions: Organized, trained, and equipped ground force units for combat operations. Developed and tested weapons and other equipment for each of the combat arms. In collaboration with the Army Air Forces, developed ground-air support doctrine and training methods. Exercised, June 1946-March 1948, command over the six armies within continental United States.

Abolished: By Circular 64, Department of the Army, March 10, 1948.

Successor Agencies: Army Field Forces (AFF, 1948-55) Continental Army Command (1955-57) U.S. Continental Army Command (1957-73) and U.S. Army Forces Command (1973- ) and U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (1973- ).

Finding Aids: Olive K. Liebman, comp., "Preliminary Inventory of the Records of Headquarters Army Ground Forces," NM 5 (1962).

Security-Classified Records: This record group may include material that is security-classified.

Related Records:
Record copies of publications of Headquarters Army Ground Forces in RG 287, Publications of the U.S. Government.
Records of the Army Air Forces, RG 18.
Records of the Headquarters of the Army, RG 108.
Records of Headquarters Army Service Forces, RG 160.
Records of the War Department General and Special Staffs, RG 165.
Records of the Chiefs of Arms, RG 177.
Records of the Army Staff, RG 319.
Records of U.S. Army Commands, 1942- , RG 338.

Subject Access Terms: World War II agency.

337.2 General Records of GHQ U.S. Army
1940-42

History: Established by War Department letter AG 320.2 (7-25-40)M (Ret.) M-OCS, July 26, 1940, with responsibility for training all continental U.S.-stationed ground forces and forces involved in ground-air operations. Headquarters became operational in Washington, DC, effective July 1, 1941, by War Department letter AG 320.2 (6-28-41) MR-M-C, July 8, 1941. Responsibilities expanded by War Department letter AG 320.2 (6-19-40) MC-E-M, July 3, 1941, to include drafting theater operations plans, and commanding theaters and task forces as assigned by War Department. Assumed command of Bermuda Base Command, July 15, 1941 Newfoundland Base Command, July 19, 1941 Greenland Base Command, November 26, 1941 Caribbean Defense Command (CDC), December 1, 1941 Western Theater of Operations (formerly Western Defense Command), December 14, 1941 and Eastern Theater of Operations (formerly Northeastern Defense Command), December 24, 1941. Command of operational forces in seaward sector of CDC and in Bermuda transferred to navy, December 19, 1941, and January 31, 1942, respectively. GHQ abolished, effective March 9, 1942, by Circular 59, War Department, March 2, 1942, with training responsibility transferred to newly established AGF planning responsibility transferred to War Plans Division, War Department General Staff (WDGS) and responsibility for theater, base, and defense commands vested in WDGS.

Textual Records: Central decimal correspondence, 1940-42. Project files, arranged by army organization and thereunder by decimal, 1940-42. Decimal and subject correspondence of GHQ Chief of Staff, Lt. Gen. Lesley J. McNair, 1940-42. Daily diary of General Staff Secretary ("Journal File"), 1941-42.

337.3 General Records of Headquarters AGF
1942-48

History: Training responsibilities of GHQ U.S. Army (SEE 337.2) consolidated with functions of Chiefs of Arms (see RG 177) to create AGF, 1942. See 337.1. Headquarters AGF transferred from Washington, DC, to Fort Monroe, VA, by AGF letter 322.011/132 (20 Aug 46) GNGCT-52, August 20, 1946 transfer completed October 1, 1946.

Textual Records: Formerly top secret correspondence, 1942-48. Central decimal correspondence, 1942-48. Project files, arranged by army organization and thereunder by decimal, 1942-43, 1946-47. Decimal and subject correspondence of AGF Commanding General, Lt. Gen. Lesley J. McNair, 1942-44. Daily diary of AGF Chief of Staff ("Journal File"), 1942-45. Issuances, 1942-48. Unit movement orders, 1942-45. Personnel movement orders, 1943-45.

337.4 General Records of Headquarters AFF
1948-54

History: Established as a Department of the Army field operating agency, National Military Establishment, by Circular 64, Department of the Army, March 10, 1948, acquiring training functions of AGF, abolished by same circular, with continental United States command functions transferred to Chief of Staff, U.S. Army. Responsible for training all individuals and units in continental United States utilized in a field army, including Organized Reserve Corps Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) and army units of National Guard. National Military Establishment redesignated Department of Defense by the National Security Act Amendments of 1949 (63 Stat. 579), August 10, 1949. AFF abolished by Change 7 to Special Regulation 10-5-1 (April 11, 1950), Department of the Army, February 1, 1955, with functions transferred to Continental Army Command, established by same issuance and given command over the six armies within continental United States.

Textual Records: Top secret and formerly top secret correspondence, 1948-50. Security-classified and unclassified central decimal correspondence, 1948-54. Issuances, 1948-54.

337.5 Records of General Staff Sections
1940-54

337.5.1 Records of the G-1 Section (Personnel)

Textual Records: Decimal correspondence, 1940-42, 1945, 1947-48. Subject correspondence, 1940-42. General correspondence of the Control Division, 1943-48 Enlisted Division, 1946-48 Officers Division, 1946-48 Women's Army Corps Division, 1943-48 and Miscellaneous Division, 1942-48.

337.5.2 Records of the G-2 Section (Intelligence)

Textual Records: Decimal correspondence, 1946-48. Subject correspondence, 1940-45. Numbered intelligence reports, 1943-46.

337.5.3 General records of the G-3 Section (Organization and
Training)

Textual Records: Decimal correspondence, 1942-52. Subject correspondence, 1942-49. Decimal correspondence of the Executive Group, 1947-48.

337.5.4 Records of the Operations Group of the G-3 Section

Textual Records: Subject correspondence of the Troop Basis Branch of the Operations Division, 1945-48. General correspondence of the following branches of the Civilian Components Division: National Guard, 1945-48 Organized Reserve Corps, 1946-48 Reserve Officers' Training Corps, 1946-48 and Universal Military Training, 1946-48. Records of the Organization and Equipment Division, consisting of decimal correspondence, 1943-48 and correspondence concerning tables of organization and equipment, 1943-45.

337.5.5 Records of the Training Group of the G-3 Section

Textual Records: Records of the Schools Division, consisting of decimal correspondence, 1942-48, with separate projects file, 1945-50 and records concerning the program of instruction, 1945- 50. Records of the Training Publications and Aids Division, consisting of general correspondence, 1942-48 and a subject file, 1942-46. Records of the Plans Division, consisting of Project AFTA-1 records, May-December 1954 and records concerning Army Mobilization Plan II, 1949-50. Records of the Troop Training Division, consisting of project files, 1942-46, and subject correspondence, 1942-44, of the Combat Arms Branch and inspection reports, 1942-44, and training reports, 1943-47, of the Replacement Training Branch.

Related Records: Records of the Desert Training Center, Amphibious Training Center, and Mountain Training Center, all under the general supervision of the Maneuvers, Special Projects, and Ammunition Branch of the Troop Training Division, under 337.7.

337.5.6 Records of the New Divisions Division of the G-3 Section

Textual Records: Records relating to newly activated divisions and divisions about to be activated, 1940-43.

337.5.7 Records of the G-4 Section (Logistics)

Textual Records: Security-classified and unclassified decimal correspondence, 1940-42, 1944-50. Issuances, 1951-54. Copies of G-4 issuances on supply and transportation, compiled for G-4 sections of new infantry divisions, 1940-42. Subject correspondence of the Maintenance Division, 1941-46.

337.5.8 Records of the Requirements Section

Textual Records: Decimal correspondence, 1941-45. Records of the Development Division, consisting of decimal correspondence, 1942- 46 reading files, 1941-44 memorandums on equipment status, 1943-45 and correspondence of component branches, 1942-45. Correspondence and reports relating to Project Sphinx, a project to develop tactics and equipment capable of reducing Japanese cave fortifications, 1942-45.

337.5.9 Records of the Development and Testing Section

Textual Records: Decimal correspondence, 1946-48.

337.6 Records of Special Staff Sections
1940-54

337.6.1 Records of administrative sections

Textual Records: Records of component units of the Adjutant General's Section, including correspondence relating to personnel, 1942-46 correspondence relating to awards and decorations, 1945-48 statistical reports on classification and replacement activities, 1942-46 and troop strength reports, 1942-46. Records of the Budget and Fiscal Section, consisting of decimal correspondence, 1941-49 subject correspondence, 1941-50 correspondence relating to individual accounts ("Fund File"), 1942-45 and administrative memorandums, 1942-48. Records of the Historical Section, consisting of reading files, 1941-45 historical studies of AGF activities, with authors' notes and drafts, 1942-45 and quarterly and annual reports, 1949-54. Records of the Information Section, consisting of decimal correspondence, 1941-48 subject correspondence, 1940-48 press releases, 1943-45 correspondence relating to war bond drives, 1944-45 and correspondence relating to the "Here's Your Infantry" national tour, 1942-45. Records of the Ground Statistics and the Ordnance Statistics Sections, consisting of personnel and equipment status reports, 1942-46 and statistical tabulations on various types of organizations, 1942-48. Copies of reports on potential training camp sites, retained by the Inspector General's Section, 1941-44.

337.6.2 Records of technical sections

Textual Records: Subject correspondence of the Aviation Section, 1940-42. Subject correspondence of the Coast Artillery Corps Section, 1940-42. Decimal correspondence of the Engineer Section, 1944-46, 1948-50. Records of the Medical Section, consisting of decimal correspondence, 1941-45, 1948 and correspondence and reports of the Armored Force Medical Research Laboratory, 1942- 45. Records of the Ordnance Section, consisting of subject correspondence, 1943-46 and decimal correspondence, 1944-48. Records of the Quartermaster Section, consisting of subject correspondence, 1940-42 decimal correspondence, 1944-47 and the daily diary, 1941-45. Records of the Signal Section, consisting of security-classified and unclassified decimal correspondence, 1947-50 and the draft of a section history, 1942. Decimal correspondence of the Transportation Section, 1947. Decimal correspondence of the Chemical Section, 1942-48. Decimal correspondence of the Liaison Group, responsible for liaison between AGF and other army units air force navy and allied armies, 1946-48. Inspection reports on training activities at various camps and stations, compiled by the Combat Arms Advisory Group and its predecessors, 1948-54.

337.7 Records of AGF Field Activities
1940-52

337.7.1 Records of the Desert Training Center, Camp Young, CA

History: Desert Training Center (DTC) established, with base facility near Indio, CA, by AGF letter 353/2 (Desert Tng) (R)- GNTAG (3-26-42), March 26, 1942, with responsibility for training mechanized units in desert warfare. Headquarters DTC became operational April 7, 1942. Base facility designated Camp Young by War Department letter AG 680.9 (4-1-42) MR-M-SP, April 25, 1942. DTC assigned to AGF by AGF letter 320.1/101(C)-GNOPN (5-1-42), May 1, 1942. Became a simulated theater of operations, with responsibilities expanded to include all types of combat and service units, effective December 1, 1942, by War Department letter AG 400 (1-21-43) OB-S-SOPP-M, January 14, 1943. Redesignated California-Arizona Maneuver Area (C-AMA), effective October 20, 1943, by War Department Memorandum W210-27-43, October 8, 1943. Ordered to be discontinued no later than May 1, 1944, by AGF letter 320.2/104 (C-AMA) (C) (1-22-44) GNGCT, January 22, 1944. Abolished, effective July 1, 1944, by Circular 267, War Department, June 30, 1944.

Textual Records: Decimal correspondence, 1942-43. Historical narratives, 1942-43. Subject correspondence of the Desert Warfare Board, 1942-43.

337.7.2 Records of the Amphibious Training Center, Camp Gordon
Johnston, FL

History: Amphibious Training Command (ATCd) established at Camp Edwards, MA, by War Department letter AG 320.2 (5-22-42) MR, May 23, 1942, with responsibility for training standard ground-force troops in amphibious landing tactics and equipment. Headquarters ATCd became operational by General Order 2, ATCd, June 15, 1942. Transferred to newly constructed facilities at Carrabelle, FL, by AGF letter 370.5/1 (Amph) GNGCT, September 19, 1942. Transfer completed by October 15, 1942. ATCd redesignated Amphibious Training Center (ATCr), effective November 1, 1942, by Memorandum W220-3-42, War Department, October 24, 1942. Carrabelle facility designated Camp Gordon Johnston by General Order 2, War Department, January 13, 1943. ATCr abolished, effective June 10, 1943, by War Department letter AG 322 (10 Jun 43) OB-I-GNGCT-M, June 12, 1943, pursuant to army-navy Memorandum of Agreement, March 10, 1943, giving navy all responsibility for amphibious training (enclosure to War Department letter AG 353 Amph Tng (3- 10-43) OB-S-C-M, March 17, 1943).

Textual Records: Subject correspondence, 1940-45. General records, 1940-50.

337.7.3 Records of the Mountain Training Center, Camp Hale, CO

History: Mountain Training Center (MTC) established at Camp Carson, CO, by War Department letter AG 320.2 (8-26-42) MR-GN, August 27, 1942, with responsibility for training selected ground-force troops in mountain and winter warfare tactics and equipment. Headquarters MTC became operational September 1, 1942, pursuant to AGF letter 320.2/6 (Mtn) (R)-GNGCT (8-26-42), August 26, 1942. Transferred to newly constructed Camp Hale, CO, by AGF letter 370.5/3 (Mtn) (R)-GNGCT (10-20-42), October 20, 1942. Transfer completed by November 16, 1942. Mountain and Winter Warfare Board (MWWB), with responsibility for testing tactics and equipment, established under Requirements Section, HQ AGF, and administratively attached to MTC, by General Order 41, MTC, June 11, 1943, pursuant to AGF letter 334/1 (Mtn & Winter War Bd) (R)- GNGCT (10-10-42), May 1, 1943. Headquarters MTC abolished by War Department letter AG 322 (7-8-43) OB-I-GNGCT-M, July 10, 1943. MTC abolished, effective October 23, 1943, by letter, HQ Second Army, Memphis, TN, October 20, 1943, pursuant to AGF 1st Indorsement, October 8, 1943, to letter, HQ Second Army, AG 322.17-30 (GNMBF), September 7, 1943. MWWB abolished, effective June 15, 1944, by AGF letter 334(c) (6-13-44)-GNRQT-4.87136, June 13, 1944.

Textual Records: Decimal and subject correspondence of MWWB, 1942-44. Records relating to Project Sphinx, 1942-45. Subject correspondence concerning Exercise Long Horn, 1951-52.

Photographs: 10th Mountain Division training at Camp Hale, CO, 1943-44 (TNG, 1,035 images). See also 337.12.

337.7.4 Records of the Army Air Support Center (AASC), Fort
Bragg, NC

History: Established, effective October 1, 1950, by General Order 17, Office of the Chief Army Field Forces (OCAFF), October 9, 1950, implementing Department of the Army letter AGAO-S, 323.31 Army Air Support Center (26 Sep 50) G-3, September 28, 1950. Abolished by General Order 29, OCAFF, November 5, 1951, implementing Department of the Army letter AGPA-A 334 (6 Jul 51) 01, July 16, 1951, which directed the establishment of a U.S. Army Section of the Joint Tactical Air Support Board and in effect transferred AASC functions to that section.

Textual Records: Decimal correspondence, 1950-51.

Related Records: Records of the successor U.S. Army Section of the Joint Tactical Air Support Board under 337.10.

337.7.5 Records of the Airborne Center

History: The Airborne Command activated March 24, 1942, at Fort Benning, GA, pursuant to AGF letter 320.2/2 (Airborne Cmd) GNDPN, March 23, 1942. Transferred to Fort Bragg, NC, April 9, 1942 to Camp Mackall, NC, April 5, 1943 and Fort Bragg, NC, November 1945. Redesignated the Airborne Center March 1, 1944, by War Department letter AG 322 (2-22-44) OB-I-GNGCT-M, February 23, 1944. Discontinued January 15, 1946, pursuant to AGF letter 320.2/308 (Abn) (12-21-45) GNGCT-43, December 21, 1945, and confirmed by Airborne Center General Order 3, January 15, 1946.

Textual Records: General orders, 1942-46. Draft history, 1942-44.

337.7.6 Records of the Antiaircraft Command

History: Activated in Washington, DC, March 9, 1942, pursuant to AGF letter 320.2/2 (3-9-42) March 9, 1942. Relocated to Richmond, VA, April, 1942 to Fort Bliss, TX, October 1944.

Textual Records: Records of the Antiaircraft Command including general decimal files, 1942-45.

337.7.6.1 Records of the Antiaircraft Artillery Training Center, Fort Bliss, TX

History: Antiaircraft Artillery Training Center activated June 9, 1941, at Fort Bliss, TX by War Department letter AG 320.2 (2-14-41) MR-M-C, June 9, 1941. Assigned to the Antiaircraft Command, June 1, 1942, pursuant to AGF letter 320.2/101 (C) GNOPN (6-1-42) June 1, 1942. Discontinued March 31, 1945, by War Department letter AG 354.1 (2-28-45) OB-GNGCT-M, March 3, 1945, and confirmed by Antiaircraft Command General Order 17, March 6, 1945.

Textual Records: General orders, 1941-1945.

337.7.6.2 Records of the Antiaircraft Artillery Training Center, Camp Edwards, MA

History: Activated March 28, 1942, and assigned to the Antiaircraft Command. Discontinued July 15, 1944, by War Department letter AG 354.11 (7-11-44) OB-I-GNGCT-M, July 12, 1944.

Textual Records:Training diary, April 1942-June 1944. Unit status sheets, 1942-44.

337.7.6.3 Records of the Barrage Balloon Center and Board, Camp Tyson, TN

History: Authorized by Army Regulation 90-25 issued June 6, 1942. Activated May 24, 1942, announced by Headquarters Barrage Balloon Training Center General Order 4, May 24, 1942. Discontinued March 31, 1944, pursuant to War Department letter AF 322. (3-4-44) OB-I-GNGCT-M, March 7, 1944, and confirmed by Headquarters Antiaircraft Command General Order 7, March 13, 1944.

Textual Records:General records, 1941-45.

337.7.7 Records of the Antiaircraft Artillery and Guided Missile Center, Fort Bliss, TX

History: Established at Fort Bliss, TX July 6, 1946, by teletype GNGCT from Chief of Operations, War Department, July 1, 1946, and announced by Headquarters Antiaircraft Artillery and Guided Missile Center General Order 1 of July 6, 1946.

Textual Records:General orders, 1946-56. General decimal files, 1949.

337.7.8 Records of the Armored Center, Fort Knox, KY

History: The Armored Center constituted July 15, 1940 pursuant to War Department letter AG 320.2 (7-5-40) M (Ret) M-C, July 10, 1940, with permanent station at Fort Knox, KY. Assigned to AGF by AGE letter 320.2/101 (C)-GNOP N (6-1-42), June 1, 1942. Redesignated the Armored Command as announced in War Department General Order 36, July 2, 1943. Redesignated the Armored Center and assigned to the Replacement and School Command, AGF, effective February 20, 1944, pursuant to War Department letter AG 322 (2-13-44) OB-I-GNGCT-M, February 16, 1944. Discontinued October 30, 1945, by directive of Headquarters, Replacement and School Command, AGF, Birmingham, AL, November 2, 1945.

Textual Records:General decimal files, 1941-45. General records of the Armored Replacement Training Center, 1942-45. Records of the Special Training Group relating to Project Cossack, 1943-45.

337.7.9 Records of the Universal Military Training Experimental Unit, Fort Knox, KY

History: Established November 25, 1946, pursuant to War Department letter WDGS WDGOT 353 UMT (7-9-46) October 10, 1946, and confirmed by Armored Center General Order 4, November 28, 1946. Discontinued July 1949.

Textual Records:General decimal files, 1946-49. Correspondence of the S-3, arranged by subject, 1946-48.

337.7.10 Records of the Artillery Center, Fort Sill, OK

History: Established November 1, 1946, pursuant to AGF letter 351/1232 (10-25-46) GNGPS, October 25, 1946, and confirmed by Artillery Center General Order 1, November 1, 1946.

Textual Records:General orders, 1946-50. General decimal files, 1950.

337.7.11 Records of the Infantry Center, Fort Benning, GA

History: The Infantry Center established at Fort Benning, GA, November 1, 1946, pursuant to AGF letter 352/1232 (10-25-46) GNGPS, October 25, 1946, and amended by AGF letter GNGPS 354.1/400 (1-16-48) January 16, 1948. It incorporated the Infantry School [see 337.9.8], AGF Board No. 3 [see 337.8.2], all AGF troops at Fort Benning, and the post of Fort Benning. Functions of the center were performed by the staff of the Infantry School. Assigned to headquarters Third Army per Station List 7, Headquarters, The Infantry Center, October 7, 1948.

Textual Records:See 337.9.8.

337.7.12 Records of the Tank Destroyer Center

History: The Tank Destroyer Tactical and Firing Center activated December 1, 1941, at Fort George G. Meade, MD, pursuant to War Department letter AF 320.2 (11-5-41) MR-M-C, November 27, 1941, and confirmed by 1st Endorsement, WD, AG0 M (ret), January 23, 1942. Relocated to Temple, TX, February 14, 1942. Redesignated the Tank Destroyer Command, announced in War Department Circular 59, March 2, 1942. Redesignated the Tank Destroyer Center and assigned to AGF Replacement and School Command by 1st Endorsement to War Department letter AG 320.2 (7-11-42) MR-WD, July 24, 1942, and confirmed by AFG letter 320.2/69 (TD Comd)-GNGCT (8-16-42) August 16, 1942. Discontinued November 10, 1945 pursuant to AGF letter AG 320.2/193 (R&SC) (R) (10-20-45) GNGCT-43, October 20, 1945 and confirmed by Headquarters, Replacement and School Command, Birmingham, AL letter 320.2 GNRST, December 14, 1945.

Textual Records:General records, 1941-46. Histories, 1941-45.

337.7.12.1 Records of the Tank Replacement Training Destroyer Center, Camp Hood, TX

Textual Records:General records, 1942-46.

337.8 Records of Service Boards
1916-50 (bulk 1940-50)

337.8.1 Records of the Field Artillery Board, Fort Bragg, NC

History: Field Artillery Board (FAB) established at Fort Riley, KS, 1904. Transferred to Fort Sill, OK, 1913 and to Fort Bragg, NC, 1922. Assigned to Headquarters AGF by Army Regulation 85-10, War Department, July 2, 1942. Transferred to Field Artillery School, AGF, by AGF letter 334/127 (R) (12-13-44) GNGCT, December 13, 1944. Abolished, with functions transferred to newly established AGF Board No. 1, by AGF letter 334/127 (R) (9-22-45) GNRQT-/40352, September 22, 1945 confirmed by General Order 4, AGF Board No. 1, February 1, 1946. Redesignated AFF Board No. 1, effective March 18, 1948, by AFF letter GNAGS 334/1 (AFF Bd.) (4- 8-48), April 8, 1948, pursuant to abolition of AGF and establishment of AFF, March 18, 1948. AFF Board No. 1 transferred to Headquarters Third Army, effective June 5, 1948, in accordance with Department of the Army message WARX 83206, June 3, 1948 confirmed by General Order 56, Headquarters Third Army, June 9, 1948.

Textual Records: Subject correspondence of the FAB,1940-45. Classified and unclassified Decimal correspondence of AGF Board No.1, 1945-4750. Classified and unclassified research and development project reports of AGF Board No.1, 1942-50.

337.8.2 Records of the Armored Board, Fort Knox, KY

History: Armored Force Board established at Fort Knox, KY, in 1940. Redesignated the Armored Board pursuant to War Department General Order 36, July 2, 1943. Assigned to the Armored Center by AGF letter 320.2/105 (Asgmt List) (C) (11-1-44) GNGCT, November 1, 1944. Discontinued September 30, 1945, with functions transferred to the Army Ground Forces Board No. 2 established at Fort Knox, KY, October 1, 1945, by AGF letter 334/127 (R) (9-22-45) GNRQT-/140352, September 22, 1945, and AGF letter 334/1 (AGF Bd. #2) (R) (9-24-45 GNRQT, September 24, 1945. Redesignated AFF Board No. 2, effective March 18, 1948, by AFF letter GNAGS 334/1 (AFF Bds) (4-8-48), April 8, 1948, pursuant to abolition of AGF and establishment of AFF, March 18, 1948. AFF Board No. 2 transferred to Headquarters Second Army, effective June 5, 1948, in accordance with Organization and Training Division Radio CSGOT/71624 (6-3-48) CM OUT 83211 (June 48) and Headquarters Second Army letter AIABC-O 322, July 12, 1948 confirmed by Department of the Army General Order 59, September 8, 1948.

Textual Records: Records of the Armored Board including general decimal files, 1939-45, and research and development project files, 1939-45. General decimal files, 1945-50, of Army Field Forces Board No. 2. Research and development project files, 1945-49, of the Amphibious Equipment Branch, Fort Ord, CA.

337.8.3 Records of the Infantry Board, Fort Benning, GA

History: Infantry Board established at Fort Benning, GA, by Change 22 to War Department Compilation of Orders (1881-1915), December 15, 1919. Assigned to Headquarters AGF by Army Regulation 75-10, War Department, July 2, 1942. Transferred to Infantry School, AGF, by AGF letter 334/127 (R) (12-13-44) GNGCT, December 13, 1944. Abolished, effective September 30, 1945, with functions transferred to newly established AGF Board No. 3, by AGF letter 334/127 (R) (9-22-45) GNRQT-/40352, September 22, 1945. AGF Board No. 3 redesignated AFF Board No. 3, effective March 18, 1948, by AFF letter GNAGS 334/1 (AFF Bd.) (4-8-48), April 8, 1948, pursuant to abolition of AGF and establishment of AFF, March 18, 1948. AFF Board No. 3 transferred to Headquarters Third Army, effective June 5, 1948, in accordance with Department of the Army message WARX 83206, June 3, 1948. Assigned to Infantry Center, Fort Benning, by General Order 56, Headquarters Third Army, June 9, 1948.

Textual Records: Numbered project reports of Infantry Board, including those of a predecessor board at Fort Sill, OK, 1916-45 of AGF Board No. 3, 1945-48 and of AFF Board No. 3, 1948-50. Monthly project status reports of Infantry Board, 1944-45 of AGF Board No. 3, 1945-48 and of AFF Board No. 3, 1948-50.

337.8.4 Records of the Antiaircraft Artillery Board, Fort Bliss, TX

History: Established at Fort Monroe, VA, March 9, 1942, pursuant to AGF letter 320.2/2 (AGF) (3-9-42), and was under the supervision of the Antiaircraft Artillery Command. Transferred to Camp Davis, NC, May 1942, and to Fort Bliss, TX, September 1944. Released from assignment to the Antiaircraft Artillery Command, September 1945 and redesignated the Antiaircraft Section of AGF Board No. 1 TX, pursuant to AGF letter 334/127 (R) (9-22-45) GNRQT-/40352, September 22, 1945. Released from assignment to AGF Board No. 1 and redesignated AGF Board No. 4, effective July 6, 1946, pursuant to AGF Radio GNGCT 51 (6-28-46) CM OUT 92921 (June 46) and announced in AFG Board No. 4 General Order 4, July 7, 1946. Also effective July 6, 1946, AGF Board No. 4 assigned to Antiaircraft Artillery and Guided Missile Center, Fort Bliss, and Commanding General, Antiaircraft Artillery and Guided Missile Center concurrently designated President AGF Board No. 4, pursuant to AGF letter 334/1 (AGF Bd. No. 4) (7-10-46) GNDEV, July 10, 1946. Effective November 20, 1946, AGF Board No. 4 assigned to Headquarters, AGF, by AGF letter 370.5/4438 (11-19-46) GNGCT-51, November 19, 1946. Redesignated AFF Board No. 4, effective March 18, 1948, by AFF letter GNAGS 334/1 (AFF Bd.) (4-8-48, pursuant to abolition of AGF and establishment of AFF, March 18, 1948. AFF Board No. 4 transferred to Headquarters Fourth Army, effective June 5, 1948, in accordance with Organization and Training Division Radio CSGOT CM-OUT 83209 (June 48) June 3, 1948.

Textual Records: Records of the Antiaircraft Artillery Board including general decimal files, 1941-45, and project reports, 1940-45. Records of AFF Board No. 4 including administrative records, 1946-50, and reports on projects, 1943-46.

337.8.5 Records of the Cost Artillery Board

History: Established at Fort Monroe, VA prior to World War II. Assigned to AGF pursuant to Army Regulation 90-5, May 18, 1943. Assigned to the Coast Artillery School by AGF letter 334/127 (R) (12-13-44) GNGCT, December 13, 1944. Discontinued September 30, 1945 by AGF letter 337/124 (R) (9-22-45) GNRQT-/40352, September 22, 1945, with functions transferred to the Coast Artillery Section, AGF Board No. 1.

Textual Records:Research and development project files, 1939-47.

337.8.6 Records of the Landing Vehicle Board

History: Established at Fort Ord, CA, April 24, 1944, pursuant to AGF letter 334/107 (R) (4-11-44) GNRQT, April 21, 1944, and confirmed by Headquarters III Corps General Order 12, April 24, 1944. Discontinued September 30, 1945, by AGF letter 334/127 (R) (9-22-45) GNRQT-/40352, September 22, 1945, with functions transferred to AGF Board No. 2.

Textual Records:Research and development project reports, 1944-45.

337.8.7 Records of the Tank Destroyer Board

History: Established at Temple, TX, May 9, 1942 pursuant to War Department letter AG 320.2 (11-5-41) MR-M-C, November 27, 1941. Assigned to the Tank Destroyer Center by AGF letter 320.2/155 (C)-GNGCT (9-1-42), September 1, 1942. Discontinued September 30, 1945, by AGF letter 334/127 (R) (9-22-45) GNRQT-/40352, September 22, 1945, with functions transferred to AGF Board No. 2.

Textual Records:General decimal files, 1941-45.

337.9 Records of Service Schools
1944-46

337.9.1 Records of the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, KS

History: Established as the School of Application for Infantry and Cavalry at Fort Leavenworth, KS, January 26, 1882, as authorized by War Department General Order 42 of May 7, 1881, and announced by War Department General Order 8, January 26, 1882. Redesignated the U.S. Infantry and Cavalry School by War Department General order 39, June 22, 1886. Redesignated the General Service and Staff School August 1, 1902, by War Department General Order 89. Divided into two schools, one designated the Infantry and Cavalry School, the other the Staff College, by War Department General Order 115, June 27, 1904. The Infantry and Cavalry School redesignated the Army School of the Line by War Department General Order 211, October 15, 1907. The School of the Line and the Staff College combined and designated the Command and General Staff School by War Department General Order 30, August 2, 1923. Redesignated the Command and Staff College in accordance with War Department Circular 154, May 29, 1946. Redesignated the Command and General Staff College April 25, 1947, by War Department General Order 41, April 25, 1947, and confirmed by War Department Circular 107, April 29, 1947. Placed under jurisdiction of the Director of Organization and Training, War Department General Staff, June 12, 1946, by War Department Circular 169, June 11, 1946. Responsibility for operation and administration delegated to HQ AGF January 1, 1947, pursuant to War Department Circular 5, January 7, 1947. Reassigned to U.S. Continental Army Command, 1955.

Textual Records: General orders, 1941-50 publication "Military Review", 1940-50.

337.9.2 Records of the Adjutant General's School

History: Establishment at Fort Washington, MD, announced per War Department letter AF 352 (Ft. Washington, Md.) (6-13-41) MO-D, June 14,1941. Relocated to Fort Sam Houston, TX August 1944 and assigned to Headquarters, Eighth Service Command. Discontinued at Fort Sam Houston, TX, May 2, 1945, and re-established at Camp Lee, VA, as a Class I activity of Headquarters, Third Service Command, pursuant to Army Services Forces letter SPX 370.5 (7-7-45) OB-S-SPMOT-M, March 23, 1945. Relocated to Fort Oglethorpe, GA, August 1, 1945, by War Department letter AG 370.5 (7-7-45) )OB-S-SPMOT-M, July 11, 1945, and assigned to Headquarters Fourth Service Command. Reclassified as an activity under the control of the Adjutant General, April 25, 1946, per ASF Circular 98, April 19, 1946. Relocated to Carlisle Barracks, PA, November 15, 1946. Reassigned to the AGF Administrative School Center, Carlisle Barracks, PA, per WD Circular 24, January 28, 1947.

Textual Records: General orders, 1944-50 numbered memorandums, 1943-50 training memorandums, 1943-44 and 1947-48 daily bulletins, 1948 programs of instruction, 1949-50.

337.9.3 Records of the Antiaircraft Artillery School

History: Activated at Camp Davis, NC, March 1942, pursuant to AGF letter 310.2/2 AGF (3-7-42) March 9, 1942. Assigned to the Antiaircraft Command [SEE 337.7.5] May 1, 1942, by AGF letter 320.2/161 (C)-GNOPN (6-1-42) June 1, 1942. Transferred to Fort Bliss, TX, September 1944 by AGF letter 370.5/402 (R) 3-8-44) GNGCT, August 3, 1944. Released from assignment to the Antiaircraft Command, October 7, 1945, and assigned to the Replacement and School Command, pursuant to AGF letter 320.2/329 (R&SC) (5-10-45) GNGCT-53, October 5, 1945. Reassigned to the Antiaircraft Artillery and Guided Missile Center, July 6, 1946, by AGF letter 354.1/1 (AAA & GM Ctr) (2-7-46) GNGCT-51, July 2, 1946. Redesignated the Antiaircraft and Guided Missile Branch, The Artillery School, by War Department Letter AG 352 (26-10-46) AO-I-GNGCT-M, November 1, 1946, and confirmed by General Order 34, Field Artillery School, Fort Sill, OK, October 29, 1946. Redesignated the Antiaircraft Artillery and Guided Missile School by Department of the Army General Order 25, April 13, 1955.

Textual Records: General decimal files, 1945-50. General orders, 1940-46.

337.9.4 Records of the Armored School

History: Authorized pursuant to War Department letter AG 320.2 (7-5-40)M (Ret) M-C, July 10, 1940. Established at Fort Knox, KY, October 1, 1940. Redesignated the Armored School pursuant to War Department General Order 36, July 2, 1943, and assigned to the Armored Command [SEE 337.7.8]. Released from assignment to the Armored Command, February 20, 1944, and assigned to the Replacement and School Command by AGF 320.2 (Repl. & Sch Comd) (C) (2-13-44) GNGCT, February 13, 1944. Assigned to AGF November 1, 1946, by AGF letter 322.011/140 (10-22-46) GNGCT-51, October 22, 1946.

Textual Records: Records of the Administration Branch including general orders, 1940-50 armor research reports, 1944-46 and general decimal files, 1940-50. General records of the Communications Department, 1949-50. Program instructions, 1946-50, of the Extension Course Department. Records of the Training Literature and Reproduction Department including records relating to field manuals, 1941-50.

337.9.5 Records of the Artillery School

History: Established June 3, 1911, as the Field Artillery School of Fire, pursuant to War Department General Order 72, 1911. Redesignated the Field Artillery School, January 30, 1920, by War Department General Order 7, 1920. Assigned to the Chief of Field Artillery until March 1942 when it was assigned to AGF, Replacement and School Command. Redesignated The Artillery School, November 1, 1946, by War Department letter AG 352 (10-26-42) AO-I-GNGCT-M, November 1, 1946, and confirmed by War Department General Order 11, January 22, 1947. On November 1, 1946, assigned directly to AGF pursuant to AGF letter 322.011/140 (10-22-46) GNGCT-51, October 22, 1946. Redesignated the Artillery and Guided Missile School by Department of the Army, General Order 25, April 13, 1955.

Textual Records: General orders, 1940-46 general decimal files, 1945-50. Outlines, plans, and correspondence, 1946-50, of the Extension Course Department.

Posters: Of the U.S. Army Field Artillery School, advertising artillery jobs, ca. 1951-52 (AP, 5 items).

337.9.6 Records of the Cavalry School, Fort Riley, KS

History: Established at Fort Riley, KS pursuant to War Department General Order 7, February 10, 1921. Assigned to the Chief of Cavalry [SEE 177.4] until March 1942 when it was assigned to the AGF Replacement and School Command. Redesignated the Ground General School, November 1, 1946, pursuant to War Department letter AG 352 (10-26-46) AO-I-GNGCT-M, November 1, 1946, and confirmed by War Department General Order 11, January 22, 1947. Assigned directly to AGF November 1, 1946, by AGF letter 322.011/140 (10-22-46) GNGCT-51, October 22, 1946.

Textual Records: General Records of the Cavalry School, 1941-50. General records of the Ground General School and School Center, 1946-49 . Records of the AGF Intelligence School, 1946-47. Records of AGF Replacement Depot No. 3, 1945.

337.9.7 Records of the Coast Artillery School

History: Established at Fort Monroe, VA pursuant to War Department General Order 7, February 10, 1921. Assigned to the Chief of Artillery [SEE 177.2 177.2.2] until March 1942 when it was reassigned to AGF Replacement and School Command. Relocated to Fort Winfield Scott, CA June 1, 1946. Redesignated as Seacoast Branch, The Artillery School, November 1, 1946, pursuant to War Department letter AG 352 (10-26-46) AO-I-GNGCT-M, November 1, 1946, and confirmed by War Department General Order 11, January 22, 1947.

Textual Records: General records, 1906-46. General decimal files, 1946-49.

337.9.8 Records of the Infantry School

History: Established as the School of Musketry, a departmental school at the Presidio of Monterey, CA pursuant to Pacific Division Order 4, February 21, 1907. Relocated to Fort Sill, OK, December 1912. Designated an Army School per War Department Bulletin 19, June 9, 1913. Designated the Infantry School of Army, 1917. Transferred to Fort Benning, GA, October 1918. Redesignated The Infantry School by War Department General Order 7, January 30, 1920. Assigned to Chief of Infantry until March 1942 thereafter assigned to AGF Replacement and School Command. Released from assignment to the Replacement and School Command, November 1, 1946, and assigned directly to AGF pursuant to AGF letter 322.011/143 (1-31-46) GNGCT-9, October 31, 1946.

Textual Records: General orders, 1940-50. Publications, "The Infantry School Mailing List", 1925-50 "The Infantry School Quarterly", 1925-50.

337.9.8.1 Records of the Airborne Section, The Infantry School

History: Activated May 15, 1942, as the Parachute School, a component of the Airborne Command, pursuant to AGF letter 320.2 (Airborne Comd-GNPON) (4-19-42) May 6, 1942. Assigned to AGF Replacement and School Command March 1, 1944, pursuant to AGF letter 320.2/103 (Airborne) (C) (2-23-44) GNGCT, February 23, 1944. Redesignated the Airborne School by WD Circular 3, January 4, 1946. Redesignated the Airborne Department, The Infantry School, effective November 1, 1946, pursuant to War Department letter AG 352 (10-26-46) AO-I-GNGCT-M, November 1, 1946, and confirmed in War Department General Order 11, January 22, 1947. Redesignated the Airborne Section, The Infantry School, per War Department letter AGAO-I-352 (11-26-46)-M, February 5, 1947.

Textual Records: General Records, 1942-46.

337.9.9 Records of the Tank Destroyer School

History: The Tank Destroyer School activated December 1, 1941, at Fort George G. Meade, MD, pursuant to War Department letter AG 320.2 (11-5-41) MR-M-C, November 27, 1941, and confirmed by 1st Endorsement, AGO, January 23, 1942. Relocated to Killeen, TX, February 14, 1942, and to Camp Hood, TX, September 18, 1942. Discontinued November 30, 1945, pursuant to AGF letter 352/250 (R) GNGCT-43, November 9, 1945, with functions transferred to The Armored School, Fort Knox, KY.

Textual Records: Lesson outlines and programs of instruction, 1952-54. Military intelligence reports, 1940-45.

337.10 Records of AFF Exercises
1951-55

Textual Records: Records of Exercise Long Horn, Fort Hood, TX, 1951-52. Records of Exercise Southern Pine, Fort Bragg, NC, including general decimal files and daily journals of the maneuver director, 1951. Records of the Joint Planning Information Bureau, 1951. Staff section journals, 1951-52. Records of the 301st Logistical Command, 1951. Records of the Troop Carrier Command, 1951. Records of Exercise Snow Fall, including operations planning files, issuances, and general decimal files of the maneuver headquarters, 1951-52 final reports of the joint staff, 1951-52 general records of the special staff, 1951-52 and general decimal files of the Umpire Group, 1951-52. Records of Exercise Snow Storm, including issuances and final report, 1952 general records of the general staff, 1952-53 and general records of the Umpire Group, 1952-53. Training operations files of exercises Blue Bolt, 1954-55 Flash Burn, 1954 Follow Me, 1954-55 Hailstorm, 1954-55 Hilltop, 1954 and Ski Jump, 1953-54.

337.11 Records of AGF and AFF Installations
1940-52

Textual Records: Records of post headquarters Camp Atterbury, IN, 1950-53 Fort Benning, GA, 1941-46 Fort Bliss, TX, 1942-50 Fort Bragg, NC, 1941-50 Camp Breckinridge, KY, 1950-52 Fort Campbell, KY, 1942-50 Camp Carson, CO, 1942-46 Camp Chaffee, AR, 1945-52 Camp Cooke, CA, n.d. Fort Crockett, TX, 1949-52 Camp Desert Rock, NV, 1951-53 Camp Drum, NY, 1948-54 Camp Edwards, MA, 1950-53 Fort George G. Meade, MD, 1943-48 Camp Gordon, GA, 1943-49 Camp Hood, TX, 1942-45 Indiantown Gap, PA, Military Reservation, 1940-48 Fort Jackson, SC, 1940-50 Fort Knox, KY, 1940-50 Fort Lawton, WA, 1943-51 Fort Leonard Wood, MO, 1941-50 Fort Lewis, WA, 1940-50 Fort McClellan, AL, 1947-48 Fort Monroe, VA, 1944-50 Fort Ord, CA, 1940-50 Camp Pickett, VA, 1942-52 Camp Roberts, CA, 1941-51 Fort Sam Houston, TX, 1940-50 Fort Story, VA, 1941-50 Fort Totten, NY, 1940-50.

337.12 Records of AFF Advisory Bodies
1949-52

Textual Records: Records of the Army Equipment and Policy Panel (AEPP), consisting of correspondence, transcripts of testimony, studies, and a final report, 1949-50. Report of the Army Equipment Board (successor to AEPP) on research and development requirements, 1950. Studies submitted to the Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) Panel by the various army commands and support services, 1952.

337.13 Records of U.S. Army Sections of Joint Boards
1949-54

Textual Records: Decimal correspondence of the U.S. Army Section of the Joint Tactical Air Support Board, 1949-51. Project files of the U.S. Army Section of the Joint Troop Airborne Board, 1953- 54.

Related Records: Records of the Army Air Support Center, predecessor of the U.S. Army Section of the Joint Tactical Air Support Board, under 337.7.4.

337.14 Motion Pictures (General)
1942

Speed with Power and Traction, demonstrating uses of MG-2 high speed military tractor, 1942 (2 reels).

337.15 Still Pictures (General)
1942-48

Photographic Prints: Allied air support of D-Day invasion of Europe, in album, 1944 (AV, 318 images). Career of Lt. Gen. Lesley J. McNair, 1942-44 (GF, 135 images). Demonstrations of amphibious combat landing techniques at Fort Edwards, MA, 1942 (FE, 265 images).

Lantern Slides: Universal Military Training, 1942-48 (SL, 29 images). Military activity in North Africa, ca. 1942 (NA, 66 images).

See Photographs under 337.7.3.

Bibliographic note: Web version based on Guide to Federal Records in the National Archives of the United States. Compiled by Robert B. Matchette et al. Washington, DC: National Archives and Records Administration, 1995.
3 volumes, 2428 pages.

This Web version is updated from time to time to include records processed since 1995.


General W.G. Haan AP-158 - History

This USS General W. G. Haan AP-158 License Plate Frame is proudly made in the USA at our facilities in Scottsboro, Alabama. Each of our MilitaryBest U.S. Navy Frames feature top and bottom Poly Coated Aluminum strips that are printed using sublimation which gives these quality automobile military frames a beautiful high gloss finish.

Please check your state and local regulations for compatibility of these Navy Frames for use on your vehicle.

A percentage of the sale of each MilitaryBest item is forwarded to the licensing departments of each respective branch of service in support of the MWR (Morale, Welfare, & Recreation) program. These payments are made by either ALL4U LLC or the wholesaler from where the item originated. Our team thanks you for your service and your support of these programs.

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Subaru EJ253 Engine

Please note that this article considers the EJ253 engine as it was supplied in Australian-delivered vehicles specifications for other markets may differ.

EJ253 block and crankcase

The Subaru EJ253 engine had an aluminium alloy block with 99.5 mm bores – with cast iron dry-type cylinder liners – and a 79.0 mm stroke for a capacity of 2457 cc. The cylinder block for the EJ253 engine had an open-deck design whereby the cylinder walls were supported at the three and nine o’clock positions.

The crankcase for the EJ253 engine had five main bearings and the flywheel housing was cast with the crankcase for increased rigidity. Like other EJ Phase II engines, the crankshaft thrust bearing was positioned at the rear of the crankshaft to reduce the transfer of natural engine frequencies to the transmission and driveline.

Pistons

Cylinder head

The EJ253 engine had an aluminium alloy cylinder head with cross-flow cooling. The EJ253 engine had a hollow-type single overhead camshaft (SOHC) for each cylinder bank. Due to the cylinder head offset, the left camshaft was longer than the right camshaft to align the cam belt sprockets. Both camshafts were driven by a single belt which had round profile teeth for quiet operation and was constructed of wear-resistant double canvas and heat resistant rubber materials with a wire core.

For the EJ253 engine, the four valves per cylinder were actuated by shim-less type buckets (i.e. one-piece, solid valve lifters).

Intelligent Active Valve Lift System (i-ALVS)

Subaru’s Intelligent Active Valve Lift System (i-AVLS) was first introduced on the post-August BL/BP Liberty and BP Outback. With i-AVLS, one intake valve for each cylinder which could utilise a low lift camshaft lobe profile or a high lift camshaft lobe profile. At low engine speeds, the operation of the low/mid lift camshaft profile on one intake valve increased the speed of the air entering the combustion chambers from that port and created an imbalance in pressure as air entered the cylinder. This pressure imbalance created a swirling pattern and better air/fuel mixture formation, thereby increasing torque output.

At high engine speeds, the rocker arms of each cylinder’s two intake valves were locked together such that high-profile camshaft lobe acted on both of them. With the higher lift, intake resistance to air as reduced to enhance top-end power. Based on engine load, driving requirements and atmospheric conditions, the ECM would determine which camshaft lift profile to engage.

Intake

Injection and ignition

The EJ253 engine had multi-point sequential fuel injection and centrally located spark plugs. Initially, the EJ253 engine had two ignition coils (one for each pair of cylinders, i.e. 1-2 and 3-4) which fired the spark plugs directly twice per cycle. The ignition knock control system had ‘fuzzy logic’ that enabled the maximum ignition advanced angle to be used without detonation since the programme continually adapted to changes in environmental conditions and fuel quality.

It is understood that the EJ253 engine had a MAF (mass airflow) sensor rather than a MAP (manifold absolute pressure) sensor for more accurate measurement of intake air volume. Furthermore, the EJ253 engine had a compression ratio of 10.1:1 the injection and firing order was 1-3-2-4.


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