Category: Interesting

The Last Notes

Abolition of slavery in France and around the world

Abolition of slavery in France and around the world

The abolition of slavery in France has been commemorated since 2006 on May 10. The abolitionist movement began in the 18th century, and it is quickly international, even if it first affects the European countries which are the leaders of the slave trade. So Great Britain which abolished slavery the first as early as 1807.

Boxer Revolt (China, 1900-1901)

Boxer Revolt (China, 1900-1901)

The Boxer Rebellion was a Chinese nationalist insurgency led by the Boxer Sect (or Boxers) against foreign legations and Catholic missions in Beijing in 1900. Occurring in reaction to the dismantling of China by the Western powers, this revolt had for goal their expulsion from the country.

The Salic law of francs

The Salic law of francs

After 507, in order to organize his kingdom and establish peace there, Clovis promulgates the most famous barbarian law passed down, the pactus legis salicœ or pact of the salic law. The Salic law is a code of judicial procedure and a penal code, divided into sixty-five titles, themselves comprising articles written mainly in Latin.

Grouchy, from Versailles to Waterloo. (C. Legros)

Grouchy, from Versailles to Waterloo. (C. Legros)

“The life of Emmanuel de Grouchy is worthy of a Balzac novel. Golden youth at the court of Versailles, twenty-five years of campaigning and glory across Europe, expiated by thirty-seven years of loneliness and exclusion. His life was turned upside down the day after Waterloo "... In this year of the bicentenary of the fatal battle, all eyes are on the one that everyone, and in the first place Napoleon himself, accused of being responsible for this ultimate defeat!

Ephemeris of June 13

Ephemeris of June 13

1983: The American probe & 34; Pioneer 10 & 34; is the first terrestrial object to leave the solar system. 1944: The first V1 (weapon of retaliation-1) set off from the Calais launch pads towards London. 313: Emperor Constantine promulgates the edict of tolerance of Milan which grants religious freedom to Christians.

Ephemeris of June 14

Ephemeris of June 14

1658. The French army under Marshal de Turenne wins over a Spanish army led by the Grand Condé, near Dunkirk. This battle of the Dunes, puts an end to a 24 year war and marks the rise in power of the Bourbon monarchy. 1800. In Marengo in Piedmont, the First Consul Bonaparte narrowly defeats an Austrian army.

The Belle Époque in France (1890-1914)

The Belle Époque in France (1890-1914)

A nostalgic expression born after the First World War, the Belle Époque refers to the years of recklessness which lead French society from 1890 to 1914. In the aftermath of the terrible conflict of 1914-1918 and the epidemic of Spanish flu which affects the whole of Europe, historians want to retain, from the first years of the twentieth century, only the economic, social, technological and artistic progress that marked the beginnings of the Third Republic and the industrial revolution.

Edit of Milan: tolerance for Christians (June 13, 313)

Edit of Milan: tolerance for Christians (June 13, 313)

According to historiographical tradition, The Edict of Milan or Edict of Constantine published in 313 granted religious freedom to Christians. Cardinal Angelo Scola, Archbishop of Milan declared on December 6, 2012 that “in a certain sense, with the Edict of Milan, the two dimensions that we call today“ religious freedom ”and“ secularism of the State ”appear for the first time in history.

Frederick II and the Sixth Crusade

Frederick II and the Sixth Crusade

If Pope Innocent III was very active in the call for the crusade, his record is more than mixed, whether with that diverted to Constantinople, where the Fifth Crusade which failed in Egypt due in part to the legate of the Pope, Innocent III himself having died before the departure of the Crusaders. It is then time for the rulers of the West to take back control, with one of the most important of them, Frederick II Hohenstaufen.

Ephemeris of June 8

Ephemeris of June 8

1949: A few months before his early death, British writer George Orwell attends the publication of his book & 34; 1984 & 34;. 1867: The Emperor of Austria Franz Joseph I becomes King of Hungary, consecrating the & 39; union of the Austrian Empire and the Kingdom of Hungary. 1637: Descartes publishes his & 34; discourse on the method & 34 ;.

Pompei, latest discoveries (Archeology files)

Pompei, latest discoveries (Archeology files)

A major exhibition on Pompeii from March 25 to June 8, 2020 was to be held at the Grand Palais in Paris. Part of the exhibition is offered as an online preview, thanks to an online reconfiguration of it entitled "Pompeii at home". Éditions Faton is offering a special edition in connection with this exhibition which takes stock of the most recent discoveries and the latest excavations on Pompeii.

Ephemeris of June 7

Ephemeris of June 7

1936: The government of the popular front of Léon Blum signs agreements with the social partners establishing, among other things, the 40-hour week and the granting of 15 days of paid leave. 1494: By the Treaty of Tordesillas, the Catholic Monarchs of Spain and John II of Portugal agree on the demarcation of their future colonial possessions.

May 31st ephemeris

May 31st ephemeris

1793: At Robespierre's call, Parisians sans culottes encircle the Convention and demand the judgment of the Girondins deputies, whom they consider guilty of collusion with foreign powers to restore the monarchy. This coup d'état sealed the fall of the Girondins and would lead to the so-called "Terror" period.

Charles VII - King of France (1422-1461)

Charles VII - King of France (1422-1461)

The reign of Charles VII, nearly forty years (1422-1461), is inseparable from the end of the Hundred Years War. It covers one of the most eventful periods in French history and may also be a time when we believed in the disappearance of the Capetian dynasty. Joan of Arc's epic will allow the "King of Bourges" to regain the throne and legitimacy, and begin the reconquest of his kingdom from the English.

The castles of the Loire

The castles of the Loire

The castles of the Loire, royal residences of incredible elegance, represent the splendor of an era, that of the Renaissance. The Italian Wars allowed French rulers to experience Italian architectural refinement. They then decide to give a “royal” look to their homes and transform their castles or have new ones built.

Ephemeris of May 21

Ephemeris of May 21

1927: American aviator Charles Lindbergh successfully crosses the Atlantic solo and non-stop. 1420: The Duke of Burgundy Philippe Le Bon and the King of England Henry V sign the Treaty of Troyes which delivers France to the English. 1358: In revolt against taxes to pay the ransom of King John held by the English, the peasants regroup in bands (great jacquerie), looting and burning the castles.

Ephemeris of May 25

Ephemeris of May 25

1963: Thirty African heads of state, meeting in Abbis Ababa at the invitation of the Emperor of Ethiopia, adopt the charter of the Organization of African Unity (OAU). 1961: Kennedy announces the intention of the United States to send a man to the moon before the end of the decade.

May 24th ephemeris

May 24th ephemeris

1941: The German battleship & 34; Bismarck & 34; sinks the cruiser & 34; HSM Hood & 34;, the pride of the Royal Navy, in the North Atlantic. 1873: The National Assembly forces the President Adolphe Thiers, too Republican for his taste, to resign and the replaced by Marshal Mac Mahon.

Ephemeris of May 29

Ephemeris of May 29

1953: New Zealander Edmund Hillary, 33, and his Nepalese Sherpa Tensing Norgay, 29, are the first to plant their flag on Everest. 1453: Capital of the Byzantine Empire since 395, Constantinople falls to the hands of the Ottoman Sultan Mehmet II, after a siege of several weeks.

Winston Churchill - Biography

Winston Churchill - Biography

Winston Churchill, along with Roosevelt and de Gaulle, is one of those politicians of twentieth century history who passed down to posterity in the wake of the Second World War. An atypical figure in British political life, Churchill has enjoyed an exceptionally long career. By the early 1930s, Winston Churchill viewed the rise of Nazism in Germany as a threat to Europe.