Category: New

The Last Notes

Egypt: between Islamist protest and post-Islamism

Egypt: between Islamist protest and post-Islamism

The late 1970s saw the Camp David negotiations culminate in peace between Egypt and Israel. However, Sadat’s policies, both internal and external, are far from unanimous, and protests are increasing, especially from the Islamists. This culminated in the assassination of the Egyptian president in October 1981, and the rise to power of Hosni Mubarak.

The Century of Louis XIV, Jean-Christian Petitfils (ed.)

The Century of Louis XIV, Jean-Christian Petitfils (ed.)

In this year of the tercentenary of the death of Louis XIV, Jean-Christian Petitfils is directing a new work which aims to be general on the Century of Louis XIV. The work, edited by Jean-Christian Petitfils, is divided into seven main parts dealing with the person of the king, the kingdom, the government, the court and the king's men, religion, Louis XIV and the ; Europe and the arts and letters, each bringing together 3 to 2 contributions from different authors, specialists of the period.

Salvador Allende and the Pinochet coup d'état (1973)

Salvador Allende and the Pinochet coup d'état (1973)

On September 11, 1973, the Chilean government of Salvador Allende was the target of a military coup led by General Augusto Pinochet. The crisis that had been simmering for months Entrenched in the presidential palace of La Moneda, Allende helplessly witnessed the takeover of the country by a military junta.

Hundred Years' War (1337-1453) - Origins and Chronology

Hundred Years' War (1337-1453) - Origins and Chronology

The Hundred Years' War is a dynastic conflict that pitted the kings of France and England between the kings of France and England for over a century at the end of the Middle Ages. Although its origins date back to the 12th century with the marriage of Henri Plantagenêt and Eleanor of Aquitaine, it is the death of Charles IV without a male heir that provokes hostilities.

Ephemeris of September 15

Ephemeris of September 15

1949: At 73, the Christian Democrat Konrad Adenauer becomes the first chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). 1940: The Vichy regime has Léon Blum arrested. After having unsuccessfully tried to convict him for a supposed responsibility in the defeat, the Vichy government will hand Blum over to the Germans, who will be deported to Buchenwald.

Nicolas Fouquet, from the rise to the fall

Nicolas Fouquet, from the rise to the fall

Appointed superintendent of finances by Mazarin, Nicolas Fouquet worked from 1653 to 1661 to restore the finances of the kingdom, damaged by the episode of the Fronde. Thanks to his charge, he accumulated a considerable fortune and had a magnificent castle built on his land in Vaux. Fouquet, who wanted to become "duke of Brittany and king of the adjacent islands", invited the king to Vaux-le-Vicomte, for one of the most beautiful festivals of the time.

La Palice, Grand Marshal of France (1470-1525)

La Palice, Grand Marshal of France (1470-1525)

Jacques II de Chabannes, Lord of La Palice, distinguished himself during the Battle of Marignan, which earned him the title of Marshal of France in 1515. He was killed on February 24, 1525 at the Battle of Pavia. He gave his name to the famous "truism". Still, it wasn't much for him, all he had to do was die in the war for his soldiers to dedicate a song to him.

The Game of Hate (Gilles de Becdelièvre)

The Game of Hate (Gilles de Becdelièvre)

With his latest novel & 34; Le jeu de la haine & 34; the Vendée author Gilles de Becdelièvre stages France from 1659. In the main roles: Regent Anne of Austria, Cardinal de Mazarin, Fouquet and Colbert, who are torn apart in a country on the verge of ruin and from which we discover little-known aspects of their personalities.

Elisabeth de Wittelsbach, Empress of Austria

Elisabeth de Wittelsbach, Empress of Austria

The Empress of Austria Elisabeth of Wittelsbach (1837-1898) was the wife of Franz Joseph I, ruler of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Made world famous in the cinema under the guise of Romy Schneider, she is represented there as the icon of a Vienna vibrating to the rhythm of the waltz. But the personality of "Sissi" was much more complex.

The Popes of Avignon (1309-1377)

The Popes of Avignon (1309-1377)

From 1309, Pope Clement V moved to Avignon, normally temporarily, in the context of the rivalry between the papacy and the King of France Philippe le Bel and the crisis of the Templars. Yet the presence of the sovereign pontiffs in the city would ultimately last for several decades, until the Great Western Schism, which broke out in 1378.

The real knight of Maison-Rouge

The real knight of Maison-Rouge

Alexandre Dumas immortalized the Chevalier de Maison-Rouge, a character in a novel, who entered the Conciergerie to make Marie-Antoinette escape in 1793. But he did exist: ladies' man, royalist conspirator, devoted body and soul to the royal family, everywhere and for all escape plans.

Ephemeris of September 4

Ephemeris of September 4

1886: The Apache chief Geronimo lays down his arms for the last time. Symbol of Amerindian resistance to Mexicans and Americans, he died in 1909.1797: A coup d'état within the Directory beheaded the royalist and moderate opposition. This coup d'etat by Fructidor saw General Bonaparte's political role grow significantly.

Ephemeris of September 1

Ephemeris of September 1

1939: German armed forces invade Poland, following a false border incident orchestrated by the SS. The European part of the Second World War has just started. 1923: A catastrophic earthquake devastates the Tokyo-Yokohama region in Japan. Almost three quarters of the capital are destroyed and there are more than 100,000 dead.

Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen (1789)

Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen (1789)

Voted by the National Constituent Assembly on August 26, 1789, the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen is one of the major texts in world history. Its ideals are the basis of nineteenth-century liberalism, even though they were not applied in revolutionary France. This text has, moreover, inspired all subsequent declarations.

Ephemeris of August 17

Ephemeris of August 17

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The liberation of Paris (August 25, 1944)

The liberation of Paris (August 25, 1944)

Following an insurrectional movement which drove the German occupiers from the capital, the liberation of Paris on August 25, 1944 was recorded at Montparnasse station in the presence of General Leclerc and Colonel Rol-Tanguy by General Dietrich Von Choltitz who signed the act surrender of German troops.

Ephemeris of August 22

Ephemeris of August 22

1962: Failed attempt at Petit-Clamart against de Gaulle. 1914: French defeat in the First Battle of the Bulge. 1812: Swiss explorer Johann Ludwig Burckhardt discovers the ancient city of Petra (in present-day Jordan) , located at the bottom of a gorge. 1485: At the Battle of Bosworth, Richard III (of the House of York) is slain, and the victor, Henry Tudor (of the House of Lancaster) is crowned King of England under the name of Henry VII.

Native Americans in the Civil War

Native Americans in the Civil War

Although in principle unaffected by the civil war that was tearing apart a nation that did not really admit them into its midst, the Amerindians also suffered the consequences of the conflict. This was particularly true for those, partly acculturated, who were established in the "Indian Territory" - an area without administrative organization located in the west of Arkansas and which corresponds today to the state of Oklahoma. .

The Civil War (John Keegan)

The Civil War (John Keegan)

Now that we have entered the period of 150 years of the Civil War (1861-65), it is the turn of the most famous historian of the military fact of the Anglo-Saxon world, the Briton John Keegan, of s 'attack the civil war that ravaged - and forever transformed - the United States. Known for his innovative approach and the breadth of his vision of military history, Keegan examines this conflict in a book, the French version of which appeared earlier this year in the Pourhistoire collection by Éditions Perrin.

Cleopatra VII, last queen of Egypt (51-30 BC)

Cleopatra VII, last queen of Egypt (51-30 BC)

The seventh named Cleopatra is one of the most illustrious women of all time. She was the last queen of Egypt, and at the height of her twenty-year reign, her power extended throughout the Mediterranean east. She was able to hoist her declining but rich kingdom of a prestigious past into a rival power of Rome.