Category: The collections

The Last Notes

Ephemeris of September 17

Ephemeris of September 17

1978: Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin, invited by United States President Jimmy Carter sign a peace agreement at Camp David. 1948: Appointed by the UN as mediator between the Arab countries and the young state of Israel, Swedish Count Bernadotte is assassinated by Jewish terrorists in West Jerusalem.

The Great Sphinx of Tanis

The Great Sphinx of Tanis

The Great Sphinx of Tanis welcomes you at the entrance to the Egyptian Antiquities department created at the Louvre museum in 1826 by Charles X. This imposing statue in pink granite, weighing twelve tons, measuring four meters eighty in length, one meter fifty in height. width and height of one meter eighty was found among the ruins of the temple of Amun-Re at Tanis, possibly capital of Lower Egypt, east of the Nile Delta, following the deciphering of the hieroglyphs by Champollion in 1822.

Battle of Marignan (September 13-14, 1515)

Battle of Marignan (September 13-14, 1515)

The Battle of Marignan is a famous victory won by Francis I over an army of Swiss mercenaries in northern Italy, September 13 and 14, 1515. This military success will provide the young king of France, knighted on the field of battle by the Lord of Bayard, great popularity and a flattering reputation for bravery.

Pierre Stoppa, Helvetian in the service of the King

Pierre Stoppa, Helvetian in the service of the King

Pierre Stoppa, nicknamed "Stuppa" by Saint Simon, was a very important figure in the king's military household. Switzerland of the canton of Graubünden, he perfectly knew how to integrate into his adopted homeland and hold his place with the king, by reaching the prestigious rank of Colonel of the Regiment of the Swiss Guards, without denying his origins.

Code noir by Colbert (edict on slaves, 1685)

Code noir by Colbert (edict on slaves, 1685)

Seen as the symbol of the Atlantic slave trade and of the slavery practiced by France, the Black Code (or "edict on the slave police"), established by Colbertet which comprises sixty articles, aimed to establish the legal status of slaves in the French Antilles. It was promulgated in 1685, the same year as the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, under the reign of Louis XIV, two years after Colbert's death.

Ephemeris of September 16

Ephemeris of September 16

1936: the & 34; Pourquoi pas & 34 ;, an oceanographic vessel of Doctor Charcot sinks near the Icelandic coast. Charcot and his crew will have a national funeral. 1824: At four in the morning, the King of France Louis XVIII passes away, eaten away by infectious gangrene in the legs. His brother, the Comte d & 39; Artois, succeeded him and became Charles X.

Philippe IV le Bel - King of France (1285-1314)

Philippe IV le Bel - King of France (1285-1314)

Philippe IV, known as "le Bel" was King of France from 1285 to 1314. He owes his nickname to his immense stature and the beauty of his impassive face: & 34; It is neither a man nor a beast, c 'is a statue. ". His reign is considered by historians to be one of the most important, but also the most disconcerting.

Ephemeris of September 10

Ephemeris of September 10

1981: Guernica, the most famous of Picasso's paintings, symbol of the horrors of war, leaves the Museum of Modern Art in New York and returns to the Prado. 1939: Seven days after Great Britain and more than two years before the States United, Canada enters the Second World War. 1915: War propaganda and censorship exasperate the pacifists Maurice and Jeanne Maréchal who found & 34; Le Canard enchaîné & 34 ;.

Burgundians and the forgotten kingdom of Burgundia

Burgundians and the forgotten kingdom of Burgundia

Made famous by Richard Wagner through the epic of the Nibelungen, the Burgundian kingdom and its people nevertheless appear in history as a quiet neighbor to the main barbarian kingdoms. We have very few sources on them. Without a chronicler like a Gregory of Tours to relate their facts, surrounded by great powers, the Burgundians show themselves too little to interest the Greek and Latin authors of late Antiquity.

Ephemeris of August 25

Ephemeris of August 25

1944: Liberation of Paris. General Leclerc, commander of the 2nd Armored Division receives the surrender of the German forces defending the capital, which has been occupied for four years. 1718: French colonists found the city of New Orleans at the mouth of the Mississippi. Named in honor of the regent, it will become the capital of the colony of Louisiana.

Ephemeris of September 5

Ephemeris of September 5

1972: Palestinian terrorists shot dead eleven Israeli athletes held hostage in Munich during the Olympics. They are then taken out of harm's way by German police. 1774: 51 representatives of British North American colonies gather in Philadelphia for a Continental Congress.

Marriage and love in the Middle Ages

Marriage and love in the Middle Ages

Marriage is one of the oldest social institutions, usually enshrined in law, uniting a man and a woman in a special form of mutual dependence, often for the purpose of founding and maintaining a family. From the middle of the Middle Ages, the Church set out to govern very strictly the union of spouses with the establishment from 1181 of the sacrament of marriage, codifying conjugal life from the publication of the banns until the establishment of the sacrament of marriage. to the carnal act.

Mona Lisa - Mona Lisa (Leonardo da Vinci)

Mona Lisa - Mona Lisa (Leonardo da Vinci)

The Mona Lisa (Mona Lisa) is a mythical painting painted by Leonardo da Vinci and the most famous work of all time, considered the timeless symbol of Western art. It owes its notoriety to the fact that it represents a woman's face and not a religious scene or a still life. Presumed portrait of Monna Lisa, wife of the Marquis Francesco del Giocondo, the work will be acquired by Francis I and will later become the centerpiece of the Louvre Museum.

Ephemeris of August 29

Ephemeris of August 29

1949: The Soviet Union becomes the second atomic power in the world, after the explosion of its first A-bomb in Kazakhstan. This is the start of a gigantic arms race with the USA. 1533: The Inca emperor Atahualpa is assassinated in Cajamarca by the conquistadors of Pizarro. The latter continued to conquer and exploit Peru, but was in turn assassinated by a rival in 1541.

August 15: the feast of the Assumption

August 15: the feast of the Assumption

August 15, religious holiday among Catholics and Orthodox and a public holiday in some countries, celebrates the elevation of the Virgin to heaven. Marian feast par excellence, the feast of the Assumption has for nearly four hundred years been the subject of a multitude of successive political recoveries, in the name of the monarchy of divine right, of the First Empire which makes this day its feast. national, of the July Monarchy which exalts the Nation today, of the Second Empire which reactivates the festivals of the First, of the Republic which keeps a holiday of the majority of the French.

Ephemeris of August 23

Ephemeris of August 23

1939: The USSR and the Third Reich sign in Moscow a non-aggression pact for 10 years, accompanied by secret protocols providing for the partition of Eastern Europe into zones of influence. 1791: The slaves of the French colony of Saint -Domingue (now Haiti) are rising. It was the start of a revolutionary process that saw the colony become independent from France in 1804.

The Montgolfier brothers and the first balloon flight (1783)

The Montgolfier brothers and the first balloon flight (1783)

The Montgolfier brothers are responsible for the first flight of a hot air balloon in 1783, with human passengers (including Pilâtre de Rozier) on board. The craft, built by Joseph and Étienne Montgolfier, stationers from Annonay in Ardèche, had been presented to King Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette a month before.

Cluny Abbey and the Cluniac Order in the Middle Ages

Cluny Abbey and the Cluniac Order in the Middle Ages

The Abbey of Cluny was founded in 910 thanks to a donation from Guillaume d & 39; Aquitaine and entrusted to Bernon, Abbot of Baume, to create a monastery for twelve monks living under the rule of Saint Benedict. The Abbey of Cluny and the Order of Cluny would quickly become one of the most important religious institutions of the Western Middle Ages, and their influence extended far beyond the realm of the Church and monarchism.

Ephemeris of August 10

Ephemeris of August 10

1949: The Committee of Ministers and the European Consultative Assembly, the two main bodies of the Council of Europe, meet for the first time in Strasbourg. 1920: By the Treaty of Sèvres, the Ottoman Empire, ally from Germany during World War I, was dismembered and Turkey reduced to Anatolia and Istanbul.

The geography of the United States on the eve of the Civil War

The geography of the United States on the eve of the Civil War

On the eve of the Civil War, the United States formed a very large country, which would soon become a vast battlefield. The physical geography of the country would closely condition the conduct of military operations as well as the strategies of the two camps. The same would apply to its population, as well as to its economic geography, starting with the distribution of resources and communications networks.